Agincourt North

Hugh Elliot House
2050 McCowan Road
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. Built sometime around 1860, this heritage-designated house was given protection in 1993 thanks to its architectural style being one of only two such dwellings in Scarborough. The mansard roof and dormers are characteristic of the Second Empire style, influenced from France.

Nina Gandolfo Artbox
Southwest Corner of Orator Gate & Middlefield Road
While often referred to as rats of the sky, pigeons are actually quite beautiful when looked at closely. With speckled feathers which colours often vary from grey, white to green and purple, not a single pigeon will look same as another. They embody the city and deserve to be seen in a different, more positive light.

Richmond Park
75 Richmond Park Boulevard
Wide open green space welcomes park visitors to toss a ball, catch a Frisbee or play an exciting game of tag. You will also find a baseball diamond, a soccer field and a children's playground. Beside this park is the Percy Williams Junior Public School. There is a path to follow into the park from Richmond Park Boulevard or Whitley Castle Crescent.

Percy Williams Junior Public School
35 White Heather Boulevard
Percy Williams was a Canadian sprinter from Vancouver, British Columbia. Williams suffered from rheumatic fever when he was 15. He was told to avoid vigorous exercise, but he nonetheless went on to become an Olympic gold medal winning sprinter. During the 1928 Olympic Games in Amsterdam he became the first sprinter not from the United States to win two gold medals in the same Olympics. In the 100-meter dash, his win was so unexpected that the medal ceremony had to be delayed while officials looked for a Canadian flag. He then went on to also win the 200-meter dash causing the double gold upset.

Stonehouse-Lawrence House
63 Delburn Drive
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. Built in 1871, the Stonehouse-Lawrence House was once the primary farm dwelling of George Stonehouse, and then later in 1920, the home of John Lawrence. It is heritage designated for being one of the last nineteenth century fieldstone houses in Scarborough. The cream coloured brick quoining surrounding the openings and at the corners make this an Upper Canadian Vernacular style home uncommon in Scarborough. Other features include the peaked gothic style-window in the front gable, and the main entrance still features the original door, sidelights and transom.

Macklin Forest Home
44 Macklingate Court
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. The Macklin Forest Home was built for the Macklin family in the 1850s. It is heritage designated for being an exceptional example of the eclectic Upper Canadian Vernacular style. One of its most interesting features is the ornate carved vegetal fretwork embellishing the treillage along the west facade veranda.

Brimley Woods Park
2755 Brimley Road
A 8.1-hectare park that is heavily wooded. The east boundary of the park follows the East Highland Creek. A children's playground is located at the edge of the forest at the north end of the park.

Alexmuir Park
205 Alexmuir Boulevard
A 2.6-hectare park featuring two multipurpose sports fields and a children's playground.

Chartland Park
99 Chartland Boulevard South
A 2.4-hectare park featuring a children's playground and open green space.

Iroquois Park
295 Chartland Boulevard South
A 4-hectare park that features two ball diamonds, three lit outdoor tennis courts with a wheelchair accessible washroom and clubhouse, a volleyball court and a children's playground. The south border of the park follows the East Highland Creek.

Explore Agincourt North

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Randell Adjei 
Agincourt Recreation Centre
31 Glen Watford Dr, Scarborough, ON M1S 2B7

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This bustling suburban neighbourhood offers plenty of shopping areas, history and green spaces to stroll and take in. Finch Avenue East, McCowan Road, Markham Road, Brimley Road, Midland Avenue, Huntingwood Drive, and Middlefield Road all feature fantastic local businesses.

Main Streets: Finch Avenue East, McCowan Road, Markham Road, Brimley Road, Midland Avenue, Huntingwood Drive and Middlefield Road
  1. Hugh Elliot House
    2050 McCowan Road
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. Built sometime around 1860, this heritage-designated house was given protection in 1993 thanks to its architectural style being one of only two such dwellings in Scarborough. The mansard roof and dormers are characteristic of the Second Empire style, influenced from France.
  2. Nina Gandolfo Artbox
    Southwest Corner of Orator Gate & Middlefield Road
    While often referred to as rats of the sky, pigeons are actually quite beautiful when looked at closely. With speckled feathers which colours often vary from grey, white to green and purple, not a single pigeon will look same as another. They embody the city and deserve to be seen in a different, more positive light.
  3. Richmond Park
    75 Richmond Park Boulevard
    Wide open green space welcomes park visitors to toss a ball, catch a Frisbee or play an exciting game of tag. You will also find a baseball diamond, a soccer field and a children's playground. Beside this park is the Percy Williams Junior Public School. There is a path to follow into the park from Richmond Park Boulevard or Whitley Castle Crescent.
  4. Percy Williams Junior Public School
    35 White Heather Boulevard
    Percy Williams was a Canadian sprinter from Vancouver, British Columbia. Williams suffered from rheumatic fever when he was 15. He was told to avoid vigorous exercise, but he nonetheless went on to become an Olympic gold medal winning sprinter. During the 1928 Olympic Games in Amsterdam he became the first sprinter not from the United States to win two gold medals in the same Olympics. In the 100-meter dash, his win was so unexpected that the medal ceremony had to be delayed while officials looked for a Canadian flag. He then went on to also win the 200-meter dash causing the double gold upset.
  5. Stonehouse-Lawrence House
    63 Delburn Drive
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. Built in 1871, the Stonehouse-Lawrence House was once the primary farm dwelling of George Stonehouse, and then later in 1920, the home of John Lawrence. It is heritage designated for being one of the last nineteenth century fieldstone houses in Scarborough. The cream coloured brick quoining surrounding the openings and at the corners make this an Upper Canadian Vernacular style home uncommon in Scarborough. Other features include the peaked gothic style-window in the front gable, and the main entrance still features the original door, sidelights and transom.
  6. Macklin Forest Home
    44 Macklingate Court
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. The Macklin Forest Home was built for the Macklin family in the 1850s. It is heritage designated for being an exceptional example of the eclectic Upper Canadian Vernacular style. One of its most interesting features is the ornate carved vegetal fretwork embellishing the treillage along the west facade veranda.
  7. Brimley Woods Park
    2755 Brimley Road
    A 8.1-hectare park that is heavily wooded. The east boundary of the park follows the East Highland Creek. A children's playground is located at the edge of the forest at the north end of the park.
  8. Alexmuir Park
    205 Alexmuir Boulevard
    A 2.6-hectare park featuring two multipurpose sports fields and a children's playground.
  9. Chartland Park
    99 Chartland Boulevard South
    A 2.4-hectare park featuring a children's playground and open green space.
  10. Iroquois Park
    295 Chartland Boulevard South
    A 4-hectare park that features two ball diamonds, three lit outdoor tennis courts with a wheelchair accessible washroom and clubhouse, a volleyball court and a children's playground. The south border of the park follows the East Highland Creek.

Accessibility information: Most points of interest on this stroll can be viewed from paved sidewalks or park trails. The Macklin Forest Home is only viewable from a paved road (please be cautious of traffic). Both Brimley Woods Park and Chartland Park are viewable from paved sidewalks but, if you'd like to enter, they are accessible via gravel paths.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.