Briar Hill-Belgravia

Alex 'Bacon' Lazich 'Serenity' Mural
2030 Eglinton Avenue West
Designed by Toronto graffiti artist Alexander 'Bacon' Lazich, this mural was commissioned by the Fairbank Village BIA, with support from the City of Toronto. The mural depicts a goldfish and lotus flower in blue, purple, and pink hues. The mural is a popular photography spot and selfie destination for people walking along Eglinton Avenue West.

Jim Bravo 'TRANSITion' Mural
1936 Eglinton Avenue West
Designed by artist Jim Bravo, this mural was commissioned by the Fairbank Village BIA. The painting depicts an old streetcar, a bus, and the new Eglinton Crosstown LRT vehicle, showcasing the past, present, and future of public transportation in Toronto and along Eglinton Avenue West.

Historic Streetscape Mural
1862 Eglinton Avenue West
This mural depicts a historic streetscape on Eglinton Avenue West, painted by an unknown artist. The mural was commissioned by Fergie Brown, who served as the mayor of the City of York from 1988 to 1994, before York was amalgamated into Toronto in 1998.

Christ Church, The British Methodist Episcopal Church
1828 Eglinton Avenue West
The congregation for the British Methodist Episcopal Church first began meeting in 1845, but the location of the original church was on Chestnut Street, in a working class neighbourhood known as The Ward. The church was founded by Black Canadians living in Toronto, and was actively in use until the 1950s. The original church was demolished when the surrounding area was redeveloped, and the church relocated to Shaw Street. In 1998, the newer church was lost to a fire, and the congregation relocated here at the intersection of Dufferin Street and Eglinton Avenue West.

Jimmy Wisdom Way and Adrian Hayles Mural
1736 Eglinton Avenue West
Designed by Adrian Hayles, this mural commemorates Ronald 'Jimmy' Ashford Wisdom a prominent member of the Little Jamaica community who passed away in 2019. Jimmy Wisdom immigrated to Toronto from Jamaica and opened a barbershop that became a cornerstone of Eglinton Avenue West. He was known in the community as a leader, mentor, and talented musician who celebrated his Jamaican culture. The mural is painted around the corner from where his shop was located, and depicts him both as a young man in Jamaica and as an older man cutting hair in his barbershop. The mural faces the newly named Jimmy Wisdom Way, replacing the previous Locksley Street in honour of his legacy. This change is part of the official recognition of the Eglinton West neighbourhood as Little Jamaica.

Filming Location for 'Da Kink in My Hair'
1692 Eglinton Avenue West
1692 Eglinton Avenue West is the site of the salon storefront used in the CBC series 'Da Kink in My Hair' based on a popular play by playwright Trey Anthony. The play debuted at the Toronto Fringe Festival before being picked up as a television show in 2007. Anthony became the first Black woman in Canada to write and produce a show on a major Canadian network. The series centered around Novelette 'Letty' Campbell the owner of a hair salon on Eglinton West and explored the lives of the Caribbean-Canadian community in the neighbourhood. While the location no longer operates as a hair salon, the surrounding segment of Eglinton Avenue West will be familiar to fans from the opening and exterior shots used throughout the show.

Trea-Jah-Isle Records
1514 Eglinton Avenue West
For a little over 25 years, Trea-Jah-Isle Records has been a landmark and cultural centre of Eglinton Avenue West. Founded by Natty B., Trea-Jah-Isle Records is known for its collection of reggae records, connecting community members of Little Jamaica to the music of the Caribbean. The shop has an expansive inventory, also selling clothing, art, fresh natural fruit drinks, Afrocentric books, and objects relating to the Rastafarian religion. Trea-Jah-Isle Records previously housed a small music recording studio.

Walter Saunders Memorial Park
426 Hopewell Avenue
Located just off Hopewell Avenue, Walter Saunders Memorial Park offers an open green space that features a number of amenities, including a playground and splash pad, outdoor fitness equipment, and an outdoor basketball court. The park also features an accessible connection to the Beltline Trail, which runs for about nine kilometres, spanning the distance between Caledonia Road and Bayview Avenue. The Beltline Trail covers the route of the old Toronto Belt Line Railway, built in the 1890s to service commuters. The railway ultimately closed not long after its opening, but the remaining route provides a trail through Toronto's natural landscape, drawing hikers, joggers, and cyclists.

Alexa Hatanaka and Patrick Thompson 'Skein' Mural
2433 Dufferin Street
Designed by Alexa Hatanaka and Patrick Thompson, 'Skein' is a bright element of the York Beltline Bridge that crosses over Dufferin. The mural on the roadside features two abstract yarn bundles, representing the importance of the yarn industry to the historic Fairbank community, and was painted in reference to a local yarn factory that no longer exists. The pedestrian tunnels running on either side of the bridge are painted with colourful stripes that connect to the vibrant skeins of yarn painted on the other side. This mural was done in partnership with the STEP program. Trails on either side of the bridge provide an entrance to the Beltline Trail.

J.T. Watson Parkette
605 Ridelle Avenue
Tucked just off Ridelle Avenue, this small parkette features a playground and a pleasant green space.

Sari Richter Artbox
2513 Dufferin Street
The very sprawling, organic and loose style is a means to set off a very rigid, standardized box. Tying natural elements into a man-made metallic object is not a new concept by any means, but the reason it works so well is that it can be surprising, intriguing and often refreshing.

Dufferin Hill Park
1200 Briar Hill Avenue
Located right at the intersection of Dufferin Street and Briar Hill Avenue, Dufferin Hill Park features a shaded green space, an array of seating, a wooden pergola, and small gardens. The park rests on what was part of the now closed Briar Hill Junior Public School, and features two plaques commemorating the community's history. The Fairbank plaque describes the history of the current neighbourhood, including the history of industries such as the Paton-Baldwin Knitting Works and Fairbank Lumber. The second plaque commemorates the Briar Hill Public School, which first opened as a log cabin in the 1830s, before it was replaced by a brick schoolhouse, and later the larger public school. A stone from the second school building is preserved in the park.

Explore Briar Hill-Belgravia

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Mark Reinhart
Toronto Public Library – Forest Hill Branch
700 Eglinton Ave W, Toronto, ON M5N 1B9

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This stroll explores the vibrant art, parks, and history of the Briar Hill-Belgravia neighbourhood. Experience the beautiful street art along Eglinton Avenue West, including a mural honouring prominent community member Jimmy Wisdom. Wander through local parks that connect you to the Beltline Trail, and learn about how early industries shaped the community. This walk takes you through the York-Eglinton BIA and Fairbank Village BIA, allowing you to visit a variety of shops and restaurants, and will connect you to the many local businesses that make up Little Jamaica.

Main Streets: Eglinton Avenue West, Dufferin Street
  1. Alex 'Bacon' Lazich 'Serenity' Mural
    2030 Eglinton Avenue West
    Designed by Toronto graffiti artist Alexander 'Bacon' Lazich, this mural was commissioned by the Fairbank Village BIA, with support from the City of Toronto. The mural depicts a goldfish and lotus flower in blue, purple, and pink hues. The mural is a popular photography spot and selfie destination for people walking along Eglinton Avenue West.
  2. Jim Bravo 'TRANSITion' Mural
    1936 Eglinton Avenue West
    Designed by artist Jim Bravo, this mural was commissioned by the Fairbank Village BIA. The painting depicts an old streetcar, a bus, and the new Eglinton Crosstown LRT vehicle, showcasing the past, present, and future of public transportation in Toronto and along Eglinton Avenue West.
  3. Historic Streetscape Mural
    1862 Eglinton Avenue West
    This mural depicts a historic streetscape on Eglinton Avenue West, painted by an unknown artist. The mural was commissioned by Fergie Brown, who served as the mayor of the City of York from 1988 to 1994, before York was amalgamated into Toronto in 1998.
  4. Christ Church, The British Methodist Episcopal Church
    1828 Eglinton Avenue West
    The congregation for the British Methodist Episcopal Church first began meeting in 1845, but the location of the original church was on Chestnut Street, in a working class neighbourhood known as The Ward. The church was founded by Black Canadians living in Toronto, and was actively in use until the 1950s. The original church was demolished when the surrounding area was redeveloped, and the church relocated to Shaw Street. In 1998, the newer church was lost to a fire, and the congregation relocated here at the intersection of Dufferin Street and Eglinton Avenue West.
  5. Jimmy Wisdom Way and Adrian Hayles Mural
    1736 Eglinton Avenue West
    Designed by Adrian Hayles, this mural commemorates Ronald 'Jimmy' Ashford Wisdom a prominent member of the Little Jamaica community who passed away in 2019. Jimmy Wisdom immigrated to Toronto from Jamaica and opened a barbershop that became a cornerstone of Eglinton Avenue West. He was known in the community as a leader, mentor, and talented musician who celebrated his Jamaican culture. The mural is painted around the corner from where his shop was located, and depicts him both as a young man in Jamaica and as an older man cutting hair in his barbershop. The mural faces the newly named Jimmy Wisdom Way, replacing the previous Locksley Street in honour of his legacy. This change is part of the official recognition of the Eglinton West neighbourhood as Little Jamaica.
  6. Filming Location for 'Da Kink in My Hair'
    1692 Eglinton Avenue West
    1692 Eglinton Avenue West is the site of the salon storefront used in the CBC series 'Da Kink in My Hair' based on a popular play by playwright Trey Anthony. The play debuted at the Toronto Fringe Festival before being picked up as a television show in 2007. Anthony became the first Black woman in Canada to write and produce a show on a major Canadian network. The series centered around Novelette 'Letty' Campbell the owner of a hair salon on Eglinton West and explored the lives of the Caribbean-Canadian community in the neighbourhood. While the location no longer operates as a hair salon, the surrounding segment of Eglinton Avenue West will be familiar to fans from the opening and exterior shots used throughout the show.
  7. Trea-Jah-Isle Records
    1514 Eglinton Avenue West
    For a little over 25 years, Trea-Jah-Isle Records has been a landmark and cultural centre of Eglinton Avenue West. Founded by Natty B., Trea-Jah-Isle Records is known for its collection of reggae records, connecting community members of Little Jamaica to the music of the Caribbean. The shop has an expansive inventory, also selling clothing, art, fresh natural fruit drinks, Afrocentric books, and objects relating to the Rastafarian religion. Trea-Jah-Isle Records previously housed a small music recording studio.
  8. Walter Saunders Memorial Park
    426 Hopewell Avenue
    Located just off Hopewell Avenue, Walter Saunders Memorial Park offers an open green space that features a number of amenities, including a playground and splash pad, outdoor fitness equipment, and an outdoor basketball court. The park also features an accessible connection to the Beltline Trail, which runs for about nine kilometres, spanning the distance between Caledonia Road and Bayview Avenue. The Beltline Trail covers the route of the old Toronto Belt Line Railway, built in the 1890s to service commuters. The railway ultimately closed not long after its opening, but the remaining route provides a trail through Toronto's natural landscape, drawing hikers, joggers, and cyclists.
  9. Alexa Hatanaka and Patrick Thompson 'Skein' Mural
    2433 Dufferin Street
    Designed by Alexa Hatanaka and Patrick Thompson, 'Skein' is a bright element of the York Beltline Bridge that crosses over Dufferin. The mural on the roadside features two abstract yarn bundles, representing the importance of the yarn industry to the historic Fairbank community, and was painted in reference to a local yarn factory that no longer exists. The pedestrian tunnels running on either side of the bridge are painted with colourful stripes that connect to the vibrant skeins of yarn painted on the other side. This mural was done in partnership with the STEP program. Trails on either side of the bridge provide an entrance to the Beltline Trail.
  10. J.T. Watson Parkette
    605 Ridelle Avenue
    Tucked just off Ridelle Avenue, this small parkette features a playground and a pleasant green space.
  11. Sari Richter Artbox
    2513 Dufferin Street
    The very sprawling, organic and loose style is a means to set off a very rigid, standardized box. Tying natural elements into a man-made metallic object is not a new concept by any means, but the reason it works so well is that it can be surprising, intriguing and often refreshing.
  12. Dufferin Hill Park
    1200 Briar Hill Avenue
    Located right at the intersection of Dufferin Street and Briar Hill Avenue, Dufferin Hill Park features a shaded green space, an array of seating, a wooden pergola, and small gardens. The park rests on what was part of the now closed Briar Hill Junior Public School, and features two plaques commemorating the community's history. The Fairbank plaque describes the history of the current neighbourhood, including the history of industries such as the Paton-Baldwin Knitting Works and Fairbank Lumber. The second plaque commemorates the Briar Hill Public School, which first opened as a log cabin in the 1830s, before it was replaced by a brick schoolhouse, and later the larger public school. A stone from the second school building is preserved in the park.

Accessibility information: This walk takes place on sidewalks and paved paths. All points of interest are viewable from the street. There is a slight incline to access Dufferin Hill Park. There is a slight incline to reach the pedestrian tunnels under the York Beltline Bridge on Dufferin Street. The pedestrian tunnels are narrow to walk through. The paths through Walter Saunders Memorial Park, J.T. Watson Parkette, and Dufferin Hill Park may be difficult to maneuver depending on weather conditions. Please note there is currently ongoing construction for the light rail transit (LRT) along Eglinton Avenue West.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.