Caledonia-Fairbank

Stacey Kinder 'Rise and Shine' Murals
1883-1885 Eglinton Avenue West
Two murals painted by artist Stacey Kinder adorn the eastern and western second-storey walls of this building. The eastern mural depicts a falcon and the west mural shows a snowy owl. Both murals were commissioned by the Fairbank Village BIA with support from the City of Toronto.

Ted Hamer 'Golden Find' Mural
2015 Eglinton Avenue West
This beautiful mural by artist Ted Hamer is on the outer walls of a local business and depicts a bright yellow gold finch amidst a colourful backdrop. It is intended as a reminder of nature in the urban environment. This mural was commissioned by the Fairbank Village BIA with support from the City of Toronto.

Eglinton - Gilbert Parkette
504 Gilbert Avenue
This small parkette offers a slice of tranquility after the hustle and bustle of the city. It features walking paths, benches, and small picnic tables.

Bert Robinson Park
400 Caledonia Road
This 2.1-hectare park features a youth soccer field, a basketball court and a children's playground. On the west side of the park, a pedestrian tunnel stretches under the railway tracks over to Dunraven Drive. The corrugated steel tube that is the tunnel is quite tiny, but offers the feeling of a secret passageway.

Prospect Cemetery
1450 St. Clair Avenue West (accessible from Eglinton Avenue West, Kitchener Avenue, and Rogers Road)
This massive cemetery stretches in a long rectangle all the way from St. Clair Avenue West to Eglinton Avenue West, and throughout the entirety of this neighbourhood. The land for the cemetery was purchased by the City in the 1880s as Toronto's growth led to a need for more burial plots. The name Prospect Cemetery comes from the two ravines that passed through the lot and offered outstanding views of the surrounding area. Over 170,000 people have been buried at Prospect since it opened in 1890, including 3,500 war veterans (many of whom were from the surrounding area). Another prominent person buried here is Matthew Parsons, whose land in the area was known as Fairbank's Farm, which part of the neighbourhood is named after.

Fairbank Memorial Community School
555 Harvie Avenue
The Fairbank area was originally established as the Fairbank Postal Village near the intersection of present-day Eglinton Avenue West and Vaughan Road. The neighbourhood was mostly planned out in the 1920s and 1930s, growing along the steep hills that dominate the area. This school was constructed in 1920 to serve the children of the growing neighbourhood, and was meant as a memorial to all the young men from the area who had served in the First World War. Several additions to the building were added in 1930, 1955, 1957, and 1965.

Charles Caccia Park
348 Nairn Avenue
A small park near Dufferin Street and Eglinton Avenue West featuring a basketball court and a children's playground. The park was originally named Nairn Park, but was renamed after former Member of Parliament Charles Caccia - who served the Davenport riding for 36 years - in 2008.

Marble Hill Parkette
22 Ennerdale Road
A lovely parkette that features a small playground and benches, with views of the surrounding area.

FH Miller Junior Public School
300 Caledonia Road
This school was constructed in 1926 to serve the growing neighbourhood in this area. It was named after Fred H. Miller, who was the first York School Board Chairman. A brand new gymnasium and adventure playground were added to the school in 2003. Through a Playground Greening Project, they also acquired a gazebo. Throughout the park, you'll find many trees and shrubs, an updated Kindergarten play area and a cycling path.

Chris Irvine Mural
Under the Rogers Road Rail Underpass (between Blackthorn Avenue and Bronco Avenue)
This spectacular mural by artist Chris Irvine beautifies the space underneath this railway underpass. It depicts a series of irises swaying in the breeze, adding a natural image to what would otherwise be a very industrial scene.

Explore Caledonia-Fairbank

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Women Paint
Toronto Public Library: Dufferin/St. Clair Branch
1625 Dufferin St, Toronto, ON M6H 3L9

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This neighbourhood provides scenic vistas in all directions from some of its higher lookout points. It traces its name back to the former Fairbank's Farm that once covered much of the area. Great local businesses can be found along Eglinton Avenue West in the Fairbank Village BIA, and Rogers Road in the Rogers Road BIA.

Main Streets: Eglinton Avenue West and Rogers Road
  1. Stacey Kinder 'Rise and Shine' Murals
    1883-1885 Eglinton Avenue West
    Two murals painted by artist Stacey Kinder adorn the eastern and western second-storey walls of this building. The eastern mural depicts a falcon and the west mural shows a snowy owl. Both murals were commissioned by the Fairbank Village BIA with support from the City of Toronto.
  2. Ted Hamer 'Golden Find' Mural
    2015 Eglinton Avenue West
    This beautiful mural by artist Ted Hamer is on the outer walls of a local business and depicts a bright yellow gold finch amidst a colourful backdrop. It is intended as a reminder of nature in the urban environment. This mural was commissioned by the Fairbank Village BIA with support from the City of Toronto.
  3. Eglinton - Gilbert Parkette
    504 Gilbert Avenue
    This small parkette offers a slice of tranquility after the hustle and bustle of the city. It features walking paths, benches, and small picnic tables.
  4. Bert Robinson Park
    400 Caledonia Road
    This 2.1-hectare park features a youth soccer field, a basketball court and a children's playground. On the west side of the park, a pedestrian tunnel stretches under the railway tracks over to Dunraven Drive. The corrugated steel tube that is the tunnel is quite tiny, but offers the feeling of a secret passageway.
  5. Prospect Cemetery
    1450 St. Clair Avenue West (accessible from Eglinton Avenue West, Kitchener Avenue, and Rogers Road)
    This massive cemetery stretches in a long rectangle all the way from St. Clair Avenue West to Eglinton Avenue West, and throughout the entirety of this neighbourhood. The land for the cemetery was purchased by the City in the 1880s as Toronto's growth led to a need for more burial plots. The name Prospect Cemetery comes from the two ravines that passed through the lot and offered outstanding views of the surrounding area. Over 170,000 people have been buried at Prospect since it opened in 1890, including 3,500 war veterans (many of whom were from the surrounding area). Another prominent person buried here is Matthew Parsons, whose land in the area was known as Fairbank's Farm, which part of the neighbourhood is named after.
  6. Fairbank Memorial Community School
    555 Harvie Avenue
    The Fairbank area was originally established as the Fairbank Postal Village near the intersection of present-day Eglinton Avenue West and Vaughan Road. The neighbourhood was mostly planned out in the 1920s and 1930s, growing along the steep hills that dominate the area. This school was constructed in 1920 to serve the children of the growing neighbourhood, and was meant as a memorial to all the young men from the area who had served in the First World War. Several additions to the building were added in 1930, 1955, 1957, and 1965.
  7. Charles Caccia Park
    348 Nairn Avenue
    A small park near Dufferin Street and Eglinton Avenue West featuring a basketball court and a children's playground. The park was originally named Nairn Park, but was renamed after former Member of Parliament Charles Caccia - who served the Davenport riding for 36 years - in 2008.
  8. Marble Hill Parkette
    22 Ennerdale Road
    A lovely parkette that features a small playground and benches, with views of the surrounding area.
  9. FH Miller Junior Public School
    300 Caledonia Road
    This school was constructed in 1926 to serve the growing neighbourhood in this area. It was named after Fred H. Miller, who was the first York School Board Chairman. A brand new gymnasium and adventure playground were added to the school in 2003. Through a Playground Greening Project, they also acquired a gazebo. Throughout the park, you'll find many trees and shrubs, an updated Kindergarten play area and a cycling path.
  10. Chris Irvine Mural
    Under the Rogers Road Rail Underpass (between Blackthorn Avenue and Bronco Avenue)
    This spectacular mural by artist Chris Irvine beautifies the space underneath this railway underpass. It depicts a series of irises swaying in the breeze, adding a natural image to what would otherwise be a very industrial scene.

Accessibility information: Most of the points of interest in this neighbourhood are viewable from the street, but the neighbourhood has many steep inclines throughout. Bert Robinson Park has stairs at some entry points.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.