Clanton Park

Shalak Attack Mural
570 Wilson Avenue
On all four extremities where the pillars at Wilson subway station begin, the artist has painted four strong and beautiful feminine gatekeepers who hold up the bridges above them, acting as mythical-like guardians protecting those who pass by. The mural goes on to celebrate the 'Weaver' as a timeless and powerful creator through a vibrant and fantastical array of symbolic imagery.

Linda Covit 'Light Containers'
525 Wilson Avenue
This multi-component artwork animates the streetscape along Wilson Avenue and defines the primary entrance to the main public courtyard of the building while visually reinforcing the corner of the property. Integrated into the landscape design, through a simple illumination system and perforations in the sculptural forms, floral images appear, disappear and reappear. These perforations evoke the image of spy apple blossoms, the fruit that once grew in nearby apple orchards.

Wilson Heights Park
325 Wilson Heights Boulevard
Wilson Heights Park sits in an unusual location. This small stretch of open land has been reimagined with a raised wooden platform, Muskoka chairs, book nook, and canopy installed over the summer months. Passersby can relax in the comfy chairs and pick out or drop off a book from the neighbourhood book exchange library.

Balmoral Park
170 Faywood Boulevard
Balmoral Park has three tennis courts, a splash pad, playground and covered picnic area.

Dublin Heights Elementary and Middle School
100 Bainbridge Avenue
The name of this school is derived from the name given to this area by David Duncan, an Irish immigrant to the area in the early nineteenth century. He bought the large stretch of land along Sheppard Avenue in 1827, and donated the land for a one room school to be built. The school has been rebuilt and now sits in its current location on Bainbridge Avenue.

Wenting Li Artbox
144 Yeomans Road
Homeward: Imaging a city as a space where creatures from all corners of the universe can come together and set down their homes side by side.

Neil Family Cottage
12 Alexis Boulevard
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. Originally built around 1900, the Neil Family Cottage was moved to its present location in 1910.

Beth David B'nai Israel Beth Am Synagogue
55 Yeomans Road
Built in 1959 by modernist architect Irving Grossman with cast concrete reliefs by artist Graham Coughtry, the Beth David synagogue was designed to look like a jewel box. Across the street from the synagogue is Ellison Park, an open green space than spans west from Yeomans Road to Harlock Boulevard.

Elie Wiesel Park
30 Palm Drive
Recently renamed from Clanton Park, Elie Wiesel Park is a 4.6-hectare recreation area that features two ball diamonds, tennis courts and a children's playground. Elie Wiesel was a writer, Nobel Laureate, and Holocaust survivor. His autobiographical novel 'Night' describes his experience in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. There is still a large Jewish population that lives in the neighbourhood surrounding the park.

Nick Sweetman Mural
3736 Bathurst Street
Spanning the 401 underpass along Bathurst Street, the StreetARToronto mural by Nick Sweetman depicts animals from different parts of the world to represent the three largest cultural groups in Clanton Park. There are Russian and Canadian bison next to cattle found in the Philippines and oryx from Israel. The mural was unveiled during the Taste of Manila Festival in 2018. This yearly festival speaks to the growing Filipino community in the neighbourhood, with Little Manila having developed in recent years. Many of the restaurants that participate in the festival are steps from the mural.

Explore Clanton Park

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Mark Reinhart
Toronto Public Library: Downsview Branch
2793 Keele St, North York, ON M3M 2G3

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

Clanton Park is home to diverse and longstanding cultural communities. There are deep ties to the Jewish community (which grew here after the Second World War) and the more recent expansion of the Filipino diaspora. Here you can find niche markets and restaurants as you stroll through the neighbourhood and the Wilson Village BIA.

Main Streets: Wilson Avenue and Billy Bishop Way
  1. Shalak Attack Mural
    570 Wilson Avenue
    On all four extremities where the pillars at Wilson subway station begin, the artist has painted four strong and beautiful feminine gatekeepers who hold up the bridges above them, acting as mythical-like guardians protecting those who pass by. The mural goes on to celebrate the 'Weaver' as a timeless and powerful creator through a vibrant and fantastical array of symbolic imagery.
  2. Linda Covit 'Light Containers'
    525 Wilson Avenue
    This multi-component artwork animates the streetscape along Wilson Avenue and defines the primary entrance to the main public courtyard of the building while visually reinforcing the corner of the property. Integrated into the landscape design, through a simple illumination system and perforations in the sculptural forms, floral images appear, disappear and reappear. These perforations evoke the image of spy apple blossoms, the fruit that once grew in nearby apple orchards.
  3. Wilson Heights Park
    325 Wilson Heights Boulevard
    Wilson Heights Park sits in an unusual location. This small stretch of open land has been reimagined with a raised wooden platform, Muskoka chairs, book nook, and canopy installed over the summer months. Passersby can relax in the comfy chairs and pick out or drop off a book from the neighbourhood book exchange library.
  4. Balmoral Park
    170 Faywood Boulevard
    Balmoral Park has three tennis courts, a splash pad, playground and covered picnic area.
  5. Dublin Heights Elementary and Middle School
    100 Bainbridge Avenue
    The name of this school is derived from the name given to this area by David Duncan, an Irish immigrant to the area in the early nineteenth century. He bought the large stretch of land along Sheppard Avenue in 1827, and donated the land for a one room school to be built. The school has been rebuilt and now sits in its current location on Bainbridge Avenue.
  6. Wenting Li Artbox
    144 Yeomans Road
    Homeward: Imaging a city as a space where creatures from all corners of the universe can come together and set down their homes side by side.
  7. Neil Family Cottage
    12 Alexis Boulevard
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. Originally built around 1900, the Neil Family Cottage was moved to its present location in 1910.
  8. Beth David B'nai Israel Beth Am Synagogue
    55 Yeomans Road
    Built in 1959 by modernist architect Irving Grossman with cast concrete reliefs by artist Graham Coughtry, the Beth David synagogue was designed to look like a jewel box. Across the street from the synagogue is Ellison Park, an open green space than spans west from Yeomans Road to Harlock Boulevard.
  9. Elie Wiesel Park
    30 Palm Drive
    Recently renamed from Clanton Park, Elie Wiesel Park is a 4.6-hectare recreation area that features two ball diamonds, tennis courts and a children's playground. Elie Wiesel was a writer, Nobel Laureate, and Holocaust survivor. His autobiographical novel 'Night' describes his experience in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. There is still a large Jewish population that lives in the neighbourhood surrounding the park.
  10. Nick Sweetman Mural
    3736 Bathurst Street
    Spanning the 401 underpass along Bathurst Street, the StreetARToronto mural by Nick Sweetman depicts animals from different parts of the world to represent the three largest cultural groups in Clanton Park. There are Russian and Canadian bison next to cattle found in the Philippines and oryx from Israel. The mural was unveiled during the Taste of Manila Festival in 2018. This yearly festival speaks to the growing Filipino community in the neighbourhood, with Little Manila having developed in recent years. Many of the restaurants that participate in the festival are steps from the mural.

Accessibility information: Roads and sidewalks in this stroll are generally paved and level. All points of interest are visible from the street.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.