Dovercourt-Wallace Emerson-Junction

Canada Foundry Company Warehouse
1100 Lansdowne Avenue
*Note: Private property. Please observe the building from the street only. This heritage-designated building was part of what was once a massive industrial complex constructed by the Canada Foundry Company in 1903. The company was drawn to the area due to its close proximity to the railway tracks. Numerous steel products were manufactured here, including railway tracks, fences, staircases, elevator cars, and fire hydrants. In 1923, it was purchased by General Electric Canada, who then manufactured electrical transformers onsite. The complex ceased industrial operations in 1981, when it was subject to a large cleaning project to remove all toxins left by previous operations. The building received its heritage designation in the early 2000s, and was converted into the residential loft space it remains today.

Canadian General Electric Water Tower
224 Wallace Avenue
This structure is a prominent neighbourhood landmark, and is among the few remaining wooden water towers in Toronto. It was constructed in 1922 to store water for the Canadian General Electric Ward Street plant. The complex beside it has been used by many artists, filmmakers, and other creatives over the years before becoming the current home of a video game company.

St. Josaphat's Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral
143 Franklin Avenue
Originally dedicated in 1914, St. Josaphat's was Toronto's earliest Ukrainian Catholic institution when it was founded by immigrants from western Ukraine who came to Toronto in the early 1900s. The original church was destroyed by fire, and was replaced by this modern structure in 1965. It continues to serve as the cathedral for the Ukrainian Catholic Community in eastern Canada.

George Chuvalo Neighbourhood Centre
50 Sousa Mendes Street
This new community centre is named after legendary heavyweight boxer and local hero George Chuvalo, who was raised in the area by Croatian immigrant parents who worked in the slaughterhouses nearby. Chuvalo was a strong community advocate, particularly in his work on the impact of substance abuse. The centre offers a wide array of programming, with special interest in assisting LGBTQ2S+ youth.

Wallace Avenue Footbridge & 371 Wallace Avenue
392 Wallace Avenue & 371 Wallace Avenue
*Note: 371 Wallace Avenue is private property. Please observe the building from the sidewalk only. Here at street level, a Heritage Toronto plaque notes the significance of the Wallace Avenue Footbridge, which crosses the railway tracks between Dundas Street West to the west, and the intersection of Wallace Avenue and Sousa Mendes Street to the east. The bridge is a rare example of a multi-span steel, Warren pony truss footbridge. It's especially unique as it crosses at an oblique angle, and not a right angle. It was originally intended as a temporary structure to connect the neighbourhoods on each side of the tracks, but has since become a beloved community landmark. Look out while crossing the bridge to see fantastic views of the surrounding area and the downtown skyline. The building at the foot of the bridge at 371 Wallace Avenue used to be a glue factory, one of many industries that dominated this area for much of the twentieth century. It was closed in 1988, and transformed into a residential loft building.

West Toronto Railpath & Lynnette Postuma 'Gradation' Mural
The Railpath runs from Cariboo Avenue to Dundas Street West. The mural is on the side of 21 Randolph Avenue.
The Railpath is a 2.1-kilometre, multi-use trail that runs along an abandoned rail line. It has become a cherished community asset, and features naturalized ecology and public art along its route, including Lynnette Postuma's mural 'Gradation'. Each of the 14,508 cinder blocks in 'Gradation' are painted in variations of blue and green to integrate this building into its surroundings and transform this otherwise monotonous grey facade into a dynamic element within Toronto's West Toronto Railpath. The project was produced by the City of Toronto, Friends of the West Toronto Railpath and deRail.

Spud, Brad Longmore, and Lianken Breau Mural
Along the north side of Bloor Street West (west of St. Helen's Avenue)
The theme of this mural surrounds the City of Toronto's motto: Diversity our Strength. The location and neighborhoods that border this underpass illustrate the diversity of the city and the mural highlights the communities found in Portugal, Italy, Latin America, Pakistan & Sri Lanka through abstract design.

Mercer Union
1286 Bloor Street West
This building used to house The Academy, one of Toronto's earliest movie theatres. It was constructed in the 1910s and seated a little over four hundred patrons. The theatre likely closed sometime in the 1960s, and the building hosted a number of other businesses in subsequent years. Mercer Union, a centre for contemporary art originally located on Mercer Street, moved into the building in 2008. Their facility includes two large white cube galleries, a workshop, an artist cabin, and a gated outdoor patio. They present five exhibitions a year that often touch on important social issues, presented by many artists who have since gained international prominence.

Dionne Brand Poem
Northeast corner of Bloor Street West and Dufferin Street
A poem by Dionne Brand is transcribed on the concrete benches at this intersection. While sitting on this bench, Brand wrote the poem about the people walking by. One of Canada's most famous poets, Brand was Toronto's Poet Laureate from 2009 to 2012. She has won numerous awards for her work, including the Governor General's Award for Poetry, the Griffin Poetry Prize, the Pat Lowther Award for Poetry, the Trillium Prize for Literature, and the Toronto Book Award.

Paradise Theatre
1006 Bloor Street West
This heritage-designated theatre was opened in 1937 and designed in Art Deco and Art Moderne styles by one of Toronto's earliest practicing Jewish architects, Benjamin Brown. In the 1960s, the theatre became a hub for the Italian community, with owner Francesco Giacomini bringing films back from Italy to show to local audiences. The fate of the cinema was uncertain after it closed in 2006, and it remained empty for over a decade. Recently, it was saved and restored to its former glory after being purchased by a local businessperson and reopened to the public in late 2019. The marquee sign was rebuilt and acts as a glorious new neighbourhood landmark along Bloor Street West.

Dovercourt Park
155 Bartlett Avenue
A 2.4-hectare park near Dupont Street and Dufferin Street featuring a lit ball diamond, two outdoor tennis courts, a wading pool and two children's playgrounds. Located at the north east corner of the park is the Dovercourt Boys and Girls Club.

1016 Shaw Street
1016 Shaw Street
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. One of the most interesting homes in the city, this house has been built as an homage to all things Greek. Some of its features include red tiling, parapets, urns, cherubs, and lions.

Paula Gonzalez-Ossa Mural
Under the Railway Underpass on Shaw Street North of Dupont Street
Created by lead artist Paula Gonzalez-Ossa and Native Men's Residence (Na-Me-Res), this mural features a vibrant design of the lands, water, flora and fauna that once existed in the areas around Garrison Creek.

672 Dupont Street
672 Dupont Street
This heritage-designated building was built as an automobile factory for the Ford Motor Company in 1914. Ford divided the building so that each floor had a different function. The first floor was an automobile showroom featuring shiny new Model-Ts and the third floor was where assembly line workers inspected and assembled auto parts by hand. Most interesting was the roof of the building, which Ford utilized as a test track! After Ford left the property, it was taken over by Planters Peanuts from 1948 to 1987. Today, the structure is a mixed-use retail and office building.

Christie Pits Park
750 Bloor Street West
Christie Pits Park is a 8.9-hectare park located at 750 Bloor Street West and Christie Street, across from the Christie subway station. The park features the Alex Duff Memorial Pool, three baseball diamonds, a multi-sport field, basketball and volleyball courts, an artificial ice rink, a children's playground and labyrinth, a splash pad, a wading pool, and a community garden. The sides of the pits are highly sloped and are used for winter related activities. Garrison Creek runs under the park, converted to a storm sewer at the turn of the twentieth century. The park was named after the Christie Sand Pits which were on the location until the early 1900s. The sand pits had been named after Christie Street, which was named after William Mellis Christie, co-founder of the Christie & Brown Cookie Company, now known simply as Mr. Christie. There is also a Heritage Toronto plaque located near the park entrance which notes the unfortunate history of the Christie Pits Riots, which occurred here in 1933. Local youths harassed a Jewish baseball team with Swastikas, resulting in a violent riot between them that lasted for five hours and shocked the city.

Explore Dovercourt-Wallace Emerson-Junction

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Women Paint
Toronto Public Library: Dufferin/St. Clair Branch
1625 Dufferin St, Toronto, ON M6H 3L9

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This large neighbourhood encompasses a significant portion of Toronto's west end, covering several diverse areas that are chock full of hip, trendy main streets, spectacular street art, and fascinating local history! Much of the area was once home to industrial complexes that dominated Toronto for much of its history, and these have since been transformed into residential and commercial uses, creating a unique neighbourhood vibe. The stroll features many of these transformed industrial sites, as well as some great local green spaces, and mesmerizing murals by some of Toronto's top street artists. Fantastic local businesses can be found in the Dovercourt Village, Bloordale Village, Bloorcourt Village, and Korea Town BIAs.

Main Streets: Davenport Road, Dupont Street, Bloor Street West, Lansdowne Avenue, Dufferin Street, Dovercourt Road, Ossington Avenue and Christie Street
  1. Canada Foundry Company Warehouse
    1100 Lansdowne Avenue
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the building from the street only. This heritage-designated building was part of what was once a massive industrial complex constructed by the Canada Foundry Company in 1903. The company was drawn to the area due to its close proximity to the railway tracks. Numerous steel products were manufactured here, including railway tracks, fences, staircases, elevator cars, and fire hydrants. In 1923, it was purchased by General Electric Canada, who then manufactured electrical transformers onsite. The complex ceased industrial operations in 1981, when it was subject to a large cleaning project to remove all toxins left by previous operations. The building received its heritage designation in the early 2000s, and was converted into the residential loft space it remains today.
  2. Canadian General Electric Water Tower
    224 Wallace Avenue
    This structure is a prominent neighbourhood landmark, and is among the few remaining wooden water towers in Toronto. It was constructed in 1922 to store water for the Canadian General Electric Ward Street plant. The complex beside it has been used by many artists, filmmakers, and other creatives over the years before becoming the current home of a video game company.
  3. St. Josaphat's Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral
    143 Franklin Avenue
    Originally dedicated in 1914, St. Josaphat's was Toronto's earliest Ukrainian Catholic institution when it was founded by immigrants from western Ukraine who came to Toronto in the early 1900s. The original church was destroyed by fire, and was replaced by this modern structure in 1965. It continues to serve as the cathedral for the Ukrainian Catholic Community in eastern Canada.
  4. George Chuvalo Neighbourhood Centre
    50 Sousa Mendes Street
    This new community centre is named after legendary heavyweight boxer and local hero George Chuvalo, who was raised in the area by Croatian immigrant parents who worked in the slaughterhouses nearby. Chuvalo was a strong community advocate, particularly in his work on the impact of substance abuse. The centre offers a wide array of programming, with special interest in assisting LGBTQ2S+ youth.
  5. Wallace Avenue Footbridge & 371 Wallace Avenue
    392 Wallace Avenue & 371 Wallace Avenue
    *Note: 371 Wallace Avenue is private property. Please observe the building from the sidewalk only. Here at street level, a Heritage Toronto plaque notes the significance of the Wallace Avenue Footbridge, which crosses the railway tracks between Dundas Street West to the west, and the intersection of Wallace Avenue and Sousa Mendes Street to the east. The bridge is a rare example of a multi-span steel, Warren pony truss footbridge. It's especially unique as it crosses at an oblique angle, and not a right angle. It was originally intended as a temporary structure to connect the neighbourhoods on each side of the tracks, but has since become a beloved community landmark. Look out while crossing the bridge to see fantastic views of the surrounding area and the downtown skyline. The building at the foot of the bridge at 371 Wallace Avenue used to be a glue factory, one of many industries that dominated this area for much of the twentieth century. It was closed in 1988, and transformed into a residential loft building.
  6. West Toronto Railpath & Lynnette Postuma 'Gradation' Mural
    The Railpath runs from Cariboo Avenue to Dundas Street West. The mural is on the side of 21 Randolph Avenue.
    The Railpath is a 2.1-kilometre, multi-use trail that runs along an abandoned rail line. It has become a cherished community asset, and features naturalized ecology and public art along its route, including Lynnette Postuma's mural 'Gradation'. Each of the 14,508 cinder blocks in 'Gradation' are painted in variations of blue and green to integrate this building into its surroundings and transform this otherwise monotonous grey facade into a dynamic element within Toronto's West Toronto Railpath. The project was produced by the City of Toronto, Friends of the West Toronto Railpath and deRail.
  7. Spud, Brad Longmore, and Lianken Breau Mural
    Along the north side of Bloor Street West (west of St. Helen's Avenue)
    The theme of this mural surrounds the City of Toronto's motto: Diversity our Strength. The location and neighborhoods that border this underpass illustrate the diversity of the city and the mural highlights the communities found in Portugal, Italy, Latin America, Pakistan & Sri Lanka through abstract design.
  8. Mercer Union
    1286 Bloor Street West
    This building used to house The Academy, one of Toronto's earliest movie theatres. It was constructed in the 1910s and seated a little over four hundred patrons. The theatre likely closed sometime in the 1960s, and the building hosted a number of other businesses in subsequent years. Mercer Union, a centre for contemporary art originally located on Mercer Street, moved into the building in 2008. Their facility includes two large white cube galleries, a workshop, an artist cabin, and a gated outdoor patio. They present five exhibitions a year that often touch on important social issues, presented by many artists who have since gained international prominence.
  9. Dionne Brand Poem
    Northeast corner of Bloor Street West and Dufferin Street
    A poem by Dionne Brand is transcribed on the concrete benches at this intersection. While sitting on this bench, Brand wrote the poem about the people walking by. One of Canada's most famous poets, Brand was Toronto's Poet Laureate from 2009 to 2012. She has won numerous awards for her work, including the Governor General's Award for Poetry, the Griffin Poetry Prize, the Pat Lowther Award for Poetry, the Trillium Prize for Literature, and the Toronto Book Award.
  10. Paradise Theatre
    1006 Bloor Street West
    This heritage-designated theatre was opened in 1937 and designed in Art Deco and Art Moderne styles by one of Toronto's earliest practicing Jewish architects, Benjamin Brown. In the 1960s, the theatre became a hub for the Italian community, with owner Francesco Giacomini bringing films back from Italy to show to local audiences. The fate of the cinema was uncertain after it closed in 2006, and it remained empty for over a decade. Recently, it was saved and restored to its former glory after being purchased by a local businessperson and reopened to the public in late 2019. The marquee sign was rebuilt and acts as a glorious new neighbourhood landmark along Bloor Street West.
  11. Dovercourt Park
    155 Bartlett Avenue
    A 2.4-hectare park near Dupont Street and Dufferin Street featuring a lit ball diamond, two outdoor tennis courts, a wading pool and two children's playgrounds. Located at the north east corner of the park is the Dovercourt Boys and Girls Club.
  12. 1016 Shaw Street
    1016 Shaw Street
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. One of the most interesting homes in the city, this house has been built as an homage to all things Greek. Some of its features include red tiling, parapets, urns, cherubs, and lions.
  13. Paula Gonzalez-Ossa Mural
    Under the Railway Underpass on Shaw Street North of Dupont Street
    Created by lead artist Paula Gonzalez-Ossa and Native Men's Residence (Na-Me-Res), this mural features a vibrant design of the lands, water, flora and fauna that once existed in the areas around Garrison Creek.
  14. 672 Dupont Street
    672 Dupont Street
    This heritage-designated building was built as an automobile factory for the Ford Motor Company in 1914. Ford divided the building so that each floor had a different function. The first floor was an automobile showroom featuring shiny new Model-Ts and the third floor was where assembly line workers inspected and assembled auto parts by hand. Most interesting was the roof of the building, which Ford utilized as a test track! After Ford left the property, it was taken over by Planters Peanuts from 1948 to 1987. Today, the structure is a mixed-use retail and office building.
  15. Christie Pits Park
    750 Bloor Street West
    Christie Pits Park is a 8.9-hectare park located at 750 Bloor Street West and Christie Street, across from the Christie subway station. The park features the Alex Duff Memorial Pool, three baseball diamonds, a multi-sport field, basketball and volleyball courts, an artificial ice rink, a children's playground and labyrinth, a splash pad, a wading pool, and a community garden. The sides of the pits are highly sloped and are used for winter related activities. Garrison Creek runs under the park, converted to a storm sewer at the turn of the twentieth century. The park was named after the Christie Sand Pits which were on the location until the early 1900s. The sand pits had been named after Christie Street, which was named after William Mellis Christie, co-founder of the Christie & Brown Cookie Company, now known simply as Mr. Christie. There is also a Heritage Toronto plaque located near the park entrance which notes the unfortunate history of the Christie Pits Riots, which occurred here in 1933. Local youths harassed a Jewish baseball team with Swastikas, resulting in a violent riot between them that lasted for five hours and shocked the city.

Accessibility information: Most of the points of interest on this stroll are viewable from the street. The Wallace Avenue Footbridge is viewable from the street, but requires traversing staircases to cross. Dovercourt Park has paved paths, but some of the amenities within it require traversing grass or dirt to access.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.