Eglinton East

Scarborough Rail Transit
Eglinton Avenue Bridge (between Midland Avenue and Kennedy Road)
The Scarborough Rail Transit (SRT) opened on March 24, 1984. During the opening ceremony, the then-mayor of Scarborough, Gus Harris, declared it the "best day in the history of Scarborough", and "City of the Future" week in Scarborough. Originally, six streetcars were to be connected in a chain and run along the line. But, because streetcars can't reverse, a large loop was added at each end of the line so the cars could turn around. However, that plan was short-lived and the streetcars never ended up making it on tracks. Instead, the white vehicles still used today took their place. Though there's an operator on every train to close the doors, monitor the track ahead, and ensure passenger safety, the trains are mostly computer operated. The infamous door chimes now used on TTC subway trains, were first introduced to Toronto with the SRT. After operating for over 30 years, the SRT is slated to stop operating in 2023.

Midland Avenue
Midland Avenue and Tara Avenue
The Midland Railway of Canada (MRC) was one of the earliest lines built in southern Ontario (twenty years before most others). The first MRC line was built in the 1870s and connected Port Hope to Midland. Other lines were built later on and included a line that ran parallel to Midland Avenue (approved in 1882) and extended from Toronto to Nipissing. This street was eventually named after the railway company, though the rail line now belongs to Canadian National Railway (CNR).

Lord Roberts Woods
155 Lord Roberts Drive
A 2-hectare forested park that features a children's playground.

Glen Ravine Park
50 Gilder Drive
This 2.4-hectare park lies between Glen Ravine Junior Public School to the east and Jean Vanier Catholic Secondary School to the west. It features open green space and soccer fields as well as outdoor fitness equipment at the south end (Gilder Drive).

Horton Park
15 Oswego Road
A small park that features a soccer field and a children's playground.

Knob Hill Park
625 Brimley Road
A picturesque 13.5-hectare park that features a lit ball hockey court, two lit basketball courts, an outdoor swimming pool, a wading pool and a children's playground. The park also features a naturalized ravine with walking trails along the West Highland Creek.

McCowan Park
475 McCowan Road
This sprawling 35-hectare park in the West Highland Creek Ravine is located at Eglinton Avenue East and McCowan Road. Featured in this park is a children's playground, a basketball court and trails that explore the nature surrounding the creek.

John McCrae Public School
431 McCowan Road
This school is named after Lieutenant Colonel John Alexander McCrae, who wrote the famous war memorial poem "In Flanders Fields". McCrae was born in Guelph, Ontario and was a poet, physician, author, artist and soldier in both the South African War and First World War. When McCrae wrote the poem in April of 1915, he was helping the wounded in The Second Battle of Ypres (an area traditionally called Flanders, in Belgium). The poem commemorates the sacrifices made during this battle and the First World War, many of which included multinational comrades such as the Punjabi soldiers of the Lahore Division of the Indian Army. During the First World War, the Indian Army contributed a million soldiers, and lost more soldiers than Canada (75,000). Thanks to these reinforcements, the Indian Army was able to recapture the lost ground in Ypres, suffering 2000 casualties in the process.

Torrance Road
Torrance Road and Eglinton Avenue East
This road was named after John Torrance, who was a prominent person in the area in the mid-to-late 1800s. He was reeve (a local official) to the Village of Scarborough in 1854 and owned a large plot of land between present day McCowan Road and Bellamy Road and from Lake Ontario to Eglinton Avenue. He leased a portion of his land to his friend William McCowan for whom McCowan Road is named after.

Bellamy Road
Bellamy Road and Eglinton Avenue East
Bellamy Road is named after nineteenth-century American author and socialist Edward Bellamy. Bellamy is best known for his utopian novel 'Looking Backward', published in 1888. The novel was set in the year 2000 in Boston, and described the United States under an ideal socialist system. Through Bellamy's propaganda for the nationalization of public services, he encouraged the foundation of Nationalist Clubs promoting socialist ideals around the world. Within a year of the novel being published, it had sold approximately 200,000 copies. By the end of the nineteenth century, it had sold more copies than any other book published in the United States (except for 'Uncle Tom's Cabin'). A follower of his teachings here in Toronto hoped to build a colony in Bellamy's name, near this intersection. A vote was held in the area in order to permit the colony, but the local farming community voted against it in record numbers.

Explore Eglinton East

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Kate Nankervis
Oakridge Park
3459 Danforth Ave, Scarborough, ON M1L 1C9

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This Scarborough neighbourhood is centred along Eglinton Avenue East, where there are many local businesses to visit. The surrounding residential areas feature green spaces that offer visitors an urban getaway.

Main Streets: Eglinton Avenue East and Danforth Road
  1. Scarborough Rail Transit
    Eglinton Avenue Bridge (between Midland Avenue and Kennedy Road)
    The Scarborough Rail Transit (SRT) opened on March 24, 1984. During the opening ceremony, the then-mayor of Scarborough, Gus Harris, declared it the "best day in the history of Scarborough", and "City of the Future" week in Scarborough. Originally, six streetcars were to be connected in a chain and run along the line. But, because streetcars can't reverse, a large loop was added at each end of the line so the cars could turn around. However, that plan was short-lived and the streetcars never ended up making it on tracks. Instead, the white vehicles still used today took their place. Though there's an operator on every train to close the doors, monitor the track ahead, and ensure passenger safety, the trains are mostly computer operated. The infamous door chimes now used on TTC subway trains, were first introduced to Toronto with the SRT. After operating for over 30 years, the SRT is slated to stop operating in 2023.
  2. Midland Avenue
    Midland Avenue and Tara Avenue
    The Midland Railway of Canada (MRC) was one of the earliest lines built in southern Ontario (twenty years before most others). The first MRC line was built in the 1870s and connected Port Hope to Midland. Other lines were built later on and included a line that ran parallel to Midland Avenue (approved in 1882) and extended from Toronto to Nipissing. This street was eventually named after the railway company, though the rail line now belongs to Canadian National Railway (CNR).
  3. Lord Roberts Woods
    155 Lord Roberts Drive
    A 2-hectare forested park that features a children's playground.
  4. Glen Ravine Park
    50 Gilder Drive
    This 2.4-hectare park lies between Glen Ravine Junior Public School to the east and Jean Vanier Catholic Secondary School to the west. It features open green space and soccer fields as well as outdoor fitness equipment at the south end (Gilder Drive).
  5. Horton Park
    15 Oswego Road
    A small park that features a soccer field and a children's playground.
  6. Knob Hill Park
    625 Brimley Road
    A picturesque 13.5-hectare park that features a lit ball hockey court, two lit basketball courts, an outdoor swimming pool, a wading pool and a children's playground. The park also features a naturalized ravine with walking trails along the West Highland Creek.
  7. McCowan Park
    475 McCowan Road
    This sprawling 35-hectare park in the West Highland Creek Ravine is located at Eglinton Avenue East and McCowan Road. Featured in this park is a children's playground, a basketball court and trails that explore the nature surrounding the creek.
  8. John McCrae Public School
    431 McCowan Road
    This school is named after Lieutenant Colonel John Alexander McCrae, who wrote the famous war memorial poem "In Flanders Fields". McCrae was born in Guelph, Ontario and was a poet, physician, author, artist and soldier in both the South African War and First World War. When McCrae wrote the poem in April of 1915, he was helping the wounded in The Second Battle of Ypres (an area traditionally called Flanders, in Belgium). The poem commemorates the sacrifices made during this battle and the First World War, many of which included multinational comrades such as the Punjabi soldiers of the Lahore Division of the Indian Army. During the First World War, the Indian Army contributed a million soldiers, and lost more soldiers than Canada (75,000). Thanks to these reinforcements, the Indian Army was able to recapture the lost ground in Ypres, suffering 2000 casualties in the process.
  9. Torrance Road
    Torrance Road and Eglinton Avenue East
    This road was named after John Torrance, who was a prominent person in the area in the mid-to-late 1800s. He was reeve (a local official) to the Village of Scarborough in 1854 and owned a large plot of land between present day McCowan Road and Bellamy Road and from Lake Ontario to Eglinton Avenue. He leased a portion of his land to his friend William McCowan for whom McCowan Road is named after.
  10. Bellamy Road
    Bellamy Road and Eglinton Avenue East
    Bellamy Road is named after nineteenth-century American author and socialist Edward Bellamy. Bellamy is best known for his utopian novel 'Looking Backward', published in 1888. The novel was set in the year 2000 in Boston, and described the United States under an ideal socialist system. Through Bellamy's propaganda for the nationalization of public services, he encouraged the foundation of Nationalist Clubs promoting socialist ideals around the world. Within a year of the novel being published, it had sold approximately 200,000 copies. By the end of the nineteenth century, it had sold more copies than any other book published in the United States (except for 'Uncle Tom's Cabin'). A follower of his teachings here in Toronto hoped to build a colony in Bellamy's name, near this intersection. A vote was held in the area in order to permit the colony, but the local farming community voted against it in record numbers.

Accessibility information: All points of interest are viewable from a paved sidewalk or park path, except for Horton Park (use caution while crossing the road to the park). Horton Park does not have an accessible entry; it can only be accessed by crossing a curb.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.