Englemount-Lawrence

Viewmount Park
169 Viewmount Avenue
This park offers visitors a baseball diamond, short bicycle trails, and a playground.

Lawrence Heights Skatepark
640 Lawrence Avenue West
A small neighbourhood skatepark with a series of ledges, rails, banks, quarterpipes and a mini halfpipe on an asphalt slab.

Joshua Barndt Mural
5 Replin Road
Painted on the Lawrence Heights Community Centre, this mural focuses on the history of the Lawrence Heights neighbourhood, pays homage to six decades of hard work, creativity and struggle, and highlights the important work of mothers.

Sean Martindale & Joshua Barndt 'Love or Love' Mural
251 Ranee Avenue
Created by youth from the Lawrence Heights community who were mentored by Toronto street artists Sean Martindale & Joshua Barndt, 'Love or Love' communicates a sentiment of compassion and determination as the neighbourhood evolves.

Baycrest Park
160 Neptune Avenue
This 9-hectare park near Allen Road and the 401 features a lit ball diamond, multi-sport field, tennis courts and a children's playground. Adjacent to the park is Baycrest Arena.

Baycrest Terrace and Wegman Centre
55 Ameer Avenue
*Note: Private property. Please observe this residence from the street only. Designed by the architecture firm Boigon & Heinonen, Baycrest Terrace won the 1977 Canadian Housing Design Council Award. It was designed in the International Style, known for its rectilinear shapes, open interior spaces, and cantilevered construction. Architect Irving D. Boigon won many awards and achieved wide acclaim for his extensive body of work, ranging from private homes and apartments to public housing, schools, libraries, synagogues, government buildings, offices, industrial complexes, and special-needs facilities for people with disabilities. This building complex was designated a heritage property by the City of Toronto in 2006.

Baycrest Centre & Jewish Old Folks Home Plaque
3560 Bathurst Street
The original Jewish Old Folks Home was established in 1918 in a home on Cecil Street in downtown Toronto. The women who ran the Ezras Noshem Society would provide Jewish seniors kosher meals and care in their own language. By the 1950s, the complex on Cecil Street, which now encompassed four additional houses and provided synagogue, hospital and social activity access, was insufficient to the needs of the community. Fundraising for a new complex led to the development of Baycrest on Bathurst Street in 1954. The current Baycrest Centre has earned international regard for its geriatric medical education and contributions to neuroscientific research, and its continued role in providing care for seniors.

Prince Charles Park
36 Prince Charles Drive
Prince Charles Park was named for the newly born prince when the neighbourhood was being developed and built in the early 1950s. The current iteration of the park features a modern playscape structure and open fields.

Toronto Public Library: Barbara Frum Branch & Community Centre
20 Covington Road
Barbara Frum was an acclaimed writer, television and radio broadcaster, interviewer, and investigative journalist. She grew up in Niagara Falls, Ontario, before moving to Toronto to attend university. She began writing for the Toronto Star newspaper in the 1960s, focusing on social issue stories. She was one of the first hosts of the CBC Radio show 'As It Happens', which blended live interviews with human-interest pieces to create a highly engaging program that still runs today. Her journalism career continued with more radio and television roles relating to public affairs programming. Frum was named to the Order of Canada in 1979 for her contributions to journalism. She died at age 54 of leukemia. The Barbara Frum Library opened in 1992.

Lawrence Plaza
534 Lawrence Avenue West
Lawrence Plaza was the first suburban shopping centre to open in Toronto. When the plaza opened in 1953, it was the largest of its kind, boasting over 40 shops, medical and office space, a 300-seat restaurant, and 2000 parking spaces with lighting for evening shopping. The location of the plaza was chosen for its easy access to the eventual Allen Expressway via the 401, Bathurst Street and Lawrence Avenue, and to the newly developed subdivisions in the surrounding area. The plaza cost three million dollars to develop (nearly thirty million in today's dollars!), and represented the shift from downtown to suburban shopping.

Explore Englemount-Lawrence

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Mark Reinhart
Toronto Public Library – Forest Hill Branch
700 Eglinton Ave W, Toronto, ON M5N 1B9

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

Bordered by the Allen Expressway and Highway 401, a mix of parks, residential areas, small businesses and exciting foods await as you explore Englemount-Lawrence. Great local businesses can be found on Bathurst Street and Lawrence Avenue West.

Main Streets: Bathurst Street and Lawrence Avenue
  1. Viewmount Park
    169 Viewmount Avenue
    This park offers visitors a baseball diamond, short bicycle trails, and a playground.
  2. Lawrence Heights Skatepark
    640 Lawrence Avenue West
    A small neighbourhood skatepark with a series of ledges, rails, banks, quarterpipes and a mini halfpipe on an asphalt slab.
  3. Joshua Barndt Mural
    5 Replin Road
    Painted on the Lawrence Heights Community Centre, this mural focuses on the history of the Lawrence Heights neighbourhood, pays homage to six decades of hard work, creativity and struggle, and highlights the important work of mothers.
  4. Sean Martindale & Joshua Barndt 'Love or Love' Mural
    251 Ranee Avenue
    Created by youth from the Lawrence Heights community who were mentored by Toronto street artists Sean Martindale & Joshua Barndt, 'Love or Love' communicates a sentiment of compassion and determination as the neighbourhood evolves.
  5. Baycrest Park
    160 Neptune Avenue
    This 9-hectare park near Allen Road and the 401 features a lit ball diamond, multi-sport field, tennis courts and a children's playground. Adjacent to the park is Baycrest Arena.
  6. Baycrest Terrace and Wegman Centre
    55 Ameer Avenue
    *Note: Private property. Please observe this residence from the street only. Designed by the architecture firm Boigon & Heinonen, Baycrest Terrace won the 1977 Canadian Housing Design Council Award. It was designed in the International Style, known for its rectilinear shapes, open interior spaces, and cantilevered construction. Architect Irving D. Boigon won many awards and achieved wide acclaim for his extensive body of work, ranging from private homes and apartments to public housing, schools, libraries, synagogues, government buildings, offices, industrial complexes, and special-needs facilities for people with disabilities. This building complex was designated a heritage property by the City of Toronto in 2006.
  7. Baycrest Centre & Jewish Old Folks Home Plaque
    3560 Bathurst Street
    The original Jewish Old Folks Home was established in 1918 in a home on Cecil Street in downtown Toronto. The women who ran the Ezras Noshem Society would provide Jewish seniors kosher meals and care in their own language. By the 1950s, the complex on Cecil Street, which now encompassed four additional houses and provided synagogue, hospital and social activity access, was insufficient to the needs of the community. Fundraising for a new complex led to the development of Baycrest on Bathurst Street in 1954. The current Baycrest Centre has earned international regard for its geriatric medical education and contributions to neuroscientific research, and its continued role in providing care for seniors.
  8. Prince Charles Park
    36 Prince Charles Drive
    Prince Charles Park was named for the newly born prince when the neighbourhood was being developed and built in the early 1950s. The current iteration of the park features a modern playscape structure and open fields.
  9. Toronto Public Library: Barbara Frum Branch & Community Centre
    20 Covington Road
    Barbara Frum was an acclaimed writer, television and radio broadcaster, interviewer, and investigative journalist. She grew up in Niagara Falls, Ontario, before moving to Toronto to attend university. She began writing for the Toronto Star newspaper in the 1960s, focusing on social issue stories. She was one of the first hosts of the CBC Radio show 'As It Happens', which blended live interviews with human-interest pieces to create a highly engaging program that still runs today. Her journalism career continued with more radio and television roles relating to public affairs programming. Frum was named to the Order of Canada in 1979 for her contributions to journalism. She died at age 54 of leukemia. The Barbara Frum Library opened in 1992.
  10. Lawrence Plaza
    534 Lawrence Avenue West
    Lawrence Plaza was the first suburban shopping centre to open in Toronto. When the plaza opened in 1953, it was the largest of its kind, boasting over 40 shops, medical and office space, a 300-seat restaurant, and 2000 parking spaces with lighting for evening shopping. The location of the plaza was chosen for its easy access to the eventual Allen Expressway via the 401, Bathurst Street and Lawrence Avenue, and to the newly developed subdivisions in the surrounding area. The plaza cost three million dollars to develop (nearly thirty million in today's dollars!), and represented the shift from downtown to suburban shopping.

Accessibility information: All points of interest are visible from the street. This stroll's roads and sidewalks are paved and level but some residential streets may not have sidewalks.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.