Etobicoke City Centre

Cloverdale Park
85 Shaver Avenue North
This 1.7 hectare park near Dundas Street West and The East Mall features three lit outdoor tennis courts, a children's playground and open green space.

Kipling Station & Line 2 Bloor-Danforth
Kipling Subway Station
Kipling Station is the western terminus of the Toronto Transit Commission's (TTC) Line 2 Bloor-Danforth subway line. Construction on the line began in June 1962 with the original route planned from Woodbine to Keele Stations, intended to relieve crowding along the streetcar route that existed along Bloor Street at that time. This stretch opened in February 1966, with subsequent extensions to Warden Station in the east and Islington Station in the west following along in 1968. The final extensions, to Kennedy Station in the east and here at Kipling Station in the west, opened in 1980. Today Kipling is among the busiest stations in the TTC's network, handling tens of thousands of passengers per day and serving as a regional hub with connections to MiWay and GO Transit.

John Kuna 'The Flight of the Passenger Pigeon' Mural
5101 Dundas Street West
The mural pays homage to the now extinct passenger pigeon. It depicts a pigeon in flight against an abstract background. It was designed so that as the viewer observes the mural from one end to the other, the bird appears to be fading, reflecting the extinction of the species.

Nicole Little Artbox
Dundas Street West and Michael Power Place
This traffic signal box has been painted to reflect the fantastic, the mundane, the original and the extraordinary faces of the neighbourhood, with love.

Michael Power Park
5055 Dundas Street West
A small park on Dundas Street West near Islington Avenue that features a gazebo, a splash pad and a children's playground.

Mabelle Park and Mabelle Avenue
49 Mabelle Avenue
Mabelle Park shows ongoing community artworks led by MABELLEarts called A Park of Many Paths. The project brings artists and residents together to transform and animate the park. Mabelle Park is used as an outdoor kitchen, includes community gardens and holds performances and ceremonies. MABELLEarts artists have worked with over 2,000 residents of all ages to transform what was once a neglected thoroughfare in the heart of the neighbourhood into a vibrant art-park and community hub. Mabelle Avenue is also a great place to observe Islington Village's urban development. A number of residences on Mabelle Avenue were constructed by Toronto Community Housing in the late 1970s and say much about how planners wished to develop the land. There is green space located around the buildings - this type of development is called a Tower in a Park design concept, originally proposed by Le Corbusier, a French architect and urbanist who was highly influential in the mid-twentieth century.

John Kuna 'Timeline: Islington Then and Now' Mural
4959 Dundas Street West
The timeline reflected in this mural provides a glimpse into three different stages of village development from the artist's perspective. The mural begins on the left with the village's original shop, Dunn's General Store, which sold groceries and hardware and housed Islington's post office. The middle of the streetscape morphs into the 1950s, with cars driving on a paved Dundas Street. The flowering catalpa trees lining the street in the mural were planted by a local resident and market gardener in the early 20th century; they were removed when Dundas was widened. At the right side of the mural is the 2006 streetscape featuring the building on which the mural is painted.

John Kuna 'Briarly - Gone but not Forgotten' Mural
4037 Dundas Street West
Now demolished, Briarly House is remembered in a beautiful mural. Briarly was named after the briar roses that once adorned its gardens. This Regency-style cottage, dually known as the Gunn House and Briarly, was built in the 1830s just east of Montgomery's Inn. A mere ten years later, it was redesigned in a Neo-Renaissance style, before its destruction in 1989. The Montgomery family owned the property for roughly 15 years (1970-1985). John Kuna emphasizes that it is not a mournful reflection on lost history, and instead considers it a representation of the enduring power of home and family.

Kenway Park
3431 Bloor Street West
A small park on Bloor Street West near Islington Avenue that features a children's playground.

Cinespace Studios
777 Kipling Avenue
*Note: Private property. Please observe the building from the street only. Previously a glass factory, this large complex was converted into a film studio in 2009. Many more film studios began popping up in this part of Etobicoke in the years since, with many companies wanting to take advantage of the area's close proximity to downtown Toronto. The film production industry in Toronto generates over $2 billion in revenue each year and employs 40,000 people. Many major productions have filmed at Cinespace Studios, including 'The Handmaid's Tale', 'Chicago', 'Good Will Hunting', 'Resident Evil', 'Hairspray', 'Taken' (TV series), and 'See', among many others. During the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival, it was announced that Cinespace would be constructing two new film studios on-site that would provide an additional 50,000 square feet of space.

John McEwen 'Between Heaven and Earth'
1025 The Queensway
One of several public art pieces by John McEwen around the city, this piece was constructed in 2002 as a starry gateway to the parking lot of a cinema complex.

'The Boys' Filming Location: Tony Cicero's Restaurant
1045 The Queensway
This building was used as a filming location for TV series 'The Boys'. It is featured as 'Tony Cicero's Restaurant' during episode two of the second season when the Boys take antagonist Translucent to a restaurant.

Sherway Gardens
25 The West Mall
Celebrating its 50th birthday in 2021, Sherway Gardens is among Toronto's oldest indoor shopping malls. Built on what was previously farmland owned by Sheridan Nurseries, the mall opened on February 24, 1971 with over 120 stores. Uniquely, the mall had 4 indoor gardens, one of which was designed by award-winning landscape architect George Tanaka. After undergoing several expansions, the mall now boasts over 200 stores and over 1 million square feet of retail space. The mall has also served as a filming location for movies such as 'Mean Girls' where it stood in as the Old Orchard Mall, and 'The Sentinel', where it stands in as the Allenwood Mall.

John McEwen 'Spillway 2013/Sherway Gate'
225 Sherway Gardens Road
This beautiful public art installation by artist John McEwen features two hollow, welded-steel jugs with skins composed of tiny stars. McEwen utilized a labour-intensive process to construct the piece, utilizing a high-intensity laser cutter to cut pieces of steel and weld them together with a plaster cast base.

Middle Road Bridge
Over Etobicoke Creek Along Sherway Trail
This heritage-designated bridge was originally constructed in 1909-10. The architect behind the bridge, Frank Barber, is known for designing many other beautiful bridges in the city, including the Old Mill Bridge along the Humber River and Sewells Road Bridge in Scarborough. It was the first reinforced concrete truss or tied arch bridge in Canada and was constructed by master bridge builder Octavius Hicks. It was originally part of Middle Road, a major transportation route between what was once York and Peel Counties. The opening of the Queen Elizabeth Way to the south of the bridge in the 1930s marked the end of the bridge as a roadway. Today, the bridge is fully pedestrian, providing a link between Toronto and Mississauga while offering lovely views over Etobicoke Creek. The bridge underwent a restoration in 2022 which won the contractor a restoration award for their efforts.

Explore Etobicoke City Centre

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

We want to hear from you! Click here to complete a short survey

Don't Miss

Explore FREE Public Art Across the City. Toronto's Year of Public Art 2021-2022 is a year-long celebration of Toronto's exceptional public art collection and the creative community behind it.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This neighbourhood covers a vast piece of southern Etobicoke, with a dynamic and unique mix of residential, commercial, and industrial sections spread throughout. The stroll provides some intriguing points of interest such as spectacular murals highlighting the Village of Islington's history, one of the largest film studios and shopping malls in the city, and a heritage-designated bridge over Etobicoke Creek. Great local businesses can be found in the Shop the Queensway BIA.

Main Streets: Dundas Street West, Bloor Street West, The Queensway, Islington Avenue, Kipling Avenue, The East Mall, North Queen Street and Sherway Gardens Road
  1. Cloverdale Park
    85 Shaver Avenue North
    This 1.7 hectare park near Dundas Street West and The East Mall features three lit outdoor tennis courts, a children's playground and open green space.
  2. Kipling Station & Line 2 Bloor-Danforth
    Kipling Subway Station
    Kipling Station is the western terminus of the Toronto Transit Commission's (TTC) Line 2 Bloor-Danforth subway line. Construction on the line began in June 1962 with the original route planned from Woodbine to Keele Stations, intended to relieve crowding along the streetcar route that existed along Bloor Street at that time. This stretch opened in February 1966, with subsequent extensions to Warden Station in the east and Islington Station in the west following along in 1968. The final extensions, to Kennedy Station in the east and here at Kipling Station in the west, opened in 1980. Today Kipling is among the busiest stations in the TTC's network, handling tens of thousands of passengers per day and serving as a regional hub with connections to MiWay and GO Transit.
  3. John Kuna 'The Flight of the Passenger Pigeon' Mural
    5101 Dundas Street West
    The mural pays homage to the now extinct passenger pigeon. It depicts a pigeon in flight against an abstract background. It was designed so that as the viewer observes the mural from one end to the other, the bird appears to be fading, reflecting the extinction of the species.
  4. Nicole Little Artbox
    Dundas Street West and Michael Power Place
    This traffic signal box has been painted to reflect the fantastic, the mundane, the original and the extraordinary faces of the neighbourhood, with love.
  5. Michael Power Park
    5055 Dundas Street West
    A small park on Dundas Street West near Islington Avenue that features a gazebo, a splash pad and a children's playground.
  6. Mabelle Park and Mabelle Avenue
    49 Mabelle Avenue
    Mabelle Park shows ongoing community artworks led by MABELLEarts called A Park of Many Paths. The project brings artists and residents together to transform and animate the park. Mabelle Park is used as an outdoor kitchen, includes community gardens and holds performances and ceremonies. MABELLEarts artists have worked with over 2,000 residents of all ages to transform what was once a neglected thoroughfare in the heart of the neighbourhood into a vibrant art-park and community hub. Mabelle Avenue is also a great place to observe Islington Village's urban development. A number of residences on Mabelle Avenue were constructed by Toronto Community Housing in the late 1970s and say much about how planners wished to develop the land. There is green space located around the buildings - this type of development is called a Tower in a Park design concept, originally proposed by Le Corbusier, a French architect and urbanist who was highly influential in the mid-twentieth century.
  7. John Kuna 'Timeline: Islington Then and Now' Mural
    4959 Dundas Street West
    The timeline reflected in this mural provides a glimpse into three different stages of village development from the artist's perspective. The mural begins on the left with the village's original shop, Dunn's General Store, which sold groceries and hardware and housed Islington's post office. The middle of the streetscape morphs into the 1950s, with cars driving on a paved Dundas Street. The flowering catalpa trees lining the street in the mural were planted by a local resident and market gardener in the early 20th century; they were removed when Dundas was widened. At the right side of the mural is the 2006 streetscape featuring the building on which the mural is painted.
  8. John Kuna 'Briarly - Gone but not Forgotten' Mural
    4037 Dundas Street West
    Now demolished, Briarly House is remembered in a beautiful mural. Briarly was named after the briar roses that once adorned its gardens. This Regency-style cottage, dually known as the Gunn House and Briarly, was built in the 1830s just east of Montgomery's Inn. A mere ten years later, it was redesigned in a Neo-Renaissance style, before its destruction in 1989. The Montgomery family owned the property for roughly 15 years (1970-1985). John Kuna emphasizes that it is not a mournful reflection on lost history, and instead considers it a representation of the enduring power of home and family.
  9. Kenway Park
    3431 Bloor Street West
    A small park on Bloor Street West near Islington Avenue that features a children's playground.
  10. Cinespace Studios
    777 Kipling Avenue
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the building from the street only. Previously a glass factory, this large complex was converted into a film studio in 2009. Many more film studios began popping up in this part of Etobicoke in the years since, with many companies wanting to take advantage of the area's close proximity to downtown Toronto. The film production industry in Toronto generates over $2 billion in revenue each year and employs 40,000 people. Many major productions have filmed at Cinespace Studios, including 'The Handmaid's Tale', 'Chicago', 'Good Will Hunting', 'Resident Evil', 'Hairspray', 'Taken' (TV series), and 'See', among many others. During the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival, it was announced that Cinespace would be constructing two new film studios on-site that would provide an additional 50,000 square feet of space.
  11. John McEwen 'Between Heaven and Earth'
    1025 The Queensway
    One of several public art pieces by John McEwen around the city, this piece was constructed in 2002 as a starry gateway to the parking lot of a cinema complex.
  12. 'The Boys' Filming Location: Tony Cicero's Restaurant
    1045 The Queensway
    This building was used as a filming location for TV series 'The Boys'. It is featured as 'Tony Cicero's Restaurant' during episode two of the second season when the Boys take antagonist Translucent to a restaurant.
  13. Sherway Gardens
    25 The West Mall
    Celebrating its 50th birthday in 2021, Sherway Gardens is among Toronto's oldest indoor shopping malls. Built on what was previously farmland owned by Sheridan Nurseries, the mall opened on February 24, 1971 with over 120 stores. Uniquely, the mall had 4 indoor gardens, one of which was designed by award-winning landscape architect George Tanaka. After undergoing several expansions, the mall now boasts over 200 stores and over 1 million square feet of retail space. The mall has also served as a filming location for movies such as 'Mean Girls' where it stood in as the Old Orchard Mall, and 'The Sentinel', where it stands in as the Allenwood Mall.
  14. John McEwen 'Spillway 2013/Sherway Gate'
    225 Sherway Gardens Road
    This beautiful public art installation by artist John McEwen features two hollow, welded-steel jugs with skins composed of tiny stars. McEwen utilized a labour-intensive process to construct the piece, utilizing a high-intensity laser cutter to cut pieces of steel and weld them together with a plaster cast base.
  15. Middle Road Bridge
    Over Etobicoke Creek Along Sherway Trail
    This heritage-designated bridge was originally constructed in 1909-10. The architect behind the bridge, Frank Barber, is known for designing many other beautiful bridges in the city, including the Old Mill Bridge along the Humber River and Sewells Road Bridge in Scarborough. It was the first reinforced concrete truss or tied arch bridge in Canada and was constructed by master bridge builder Octavius Hicks. It was originally part of Middle Road, a major transportation route between what was once York and Peel Counties. The opening of the Queen Elizabeth Way to the south of the bridge in the 1930s marked the end of the bridge as a roadway. Today, the bridge is fully pedestrian, providing a link between Toronto and Mississauga while offering lovely views over Etobicoke Creek. The bridge underwent a restoration in 2022 which won the contractor a restoration award for their efforts.

Accessibility information: Most of the points of interest on this stroll are viewable from the street. Unpaved and uneven surfaces and elevation changes may be encountered along the trail towards the Middle Road Bridge. Also exercise caution while walking along Sherway Drive en route to the Middle Road Bridge as portions of the street do not have sidewalks.

The StrollTO itineraries may follow routes that do not receive winter maintenance. Please review winter safety tips and for more information contact 311.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.