Flemingdon Park

Linkwood Lane Park
10 Linkwood Lane
This 2-hectare park features a ball diamond, a multipurpose sports field and a children's playground. Just around the corner from the park is the Linkwood Lane Dog Park and Vendome Basketball Court (on Grenoble Drive), both of which are publicly accessible.

Flemingdon Park Community Centre
150 Grenoble Drive
The Flemingdon Park Community Centre offers programs and facilities including indoor and outdoor playgrounds, a picnic area, a splash pad, a community garden, and outdoor courts and fields. After-school programs and adult fitness programs are also available. The community centre also houses a Playground Paradise, an indoor playground structure for children up to age 12.

Angela James Arena
165 Grenoble Drive
Angela James Arena is a recreation facility housing a hockey arena. Named after Canadian hockey player Angela James in 2009, the arena celebrates her achievements in bringing women's hockey to the forefront of public awareness. Having grown up in the Flemingdon Park neighbourhood, James led the Canadian women's hockey team to four world championships in 1990, 1992, 1994, and 1997. Known as the first superstar of women's hockey, she was one of the first three women - and the first Black player - to be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2010. James was also the first openly gay player to be inducted. Having achieved international success during her career, she is a certified referee and has coached numerous women's hockey teams.

E.T. Seton Park Archery Range & Disc Golf Course
Don Mills Road & Gateway Boulevard North
The Don River runs through E. T. Seton Park, situated behind the Ontario Science Centre and named after Ernest Thompson Seton. Seton was a British author and naturalist who spent a significant part of his childhood in the Don Valley. The park connects the Flemingdon Park neighbourhood to Thorncliffe Park to the west. It contains multiple walking, jogging, and cycling paths, as well as an archery range (one of only two public ranges in Canada), disc golf course, nordic skiing and equestrian trails.

Charles Weiss 'Dreamers Worldview' Artbox
Don Mills Road & St Dennis Drive
'Dreamers Worldview' depicts many clouds with a round head with eyes covered by a revolving image reel. Every person dreams and likes the idea of seeing the world around them.

TELUScape Discovery Plaza
752 Don Mills Road
The TELUScape Discovery Plaza was designed by Reich + Petch and EDA Collaborative, and opened to the public in 2006. Comprising a number of outdoor installations such as the 300-foot polished granite 'Lotic Meander' by Stacey Levy, the Plaza also includes the world's largest hydraulophone, by installation artist Steve Mann. Formerly a large fountain in front of the Ontario Science Centre, the hydraulophone that has replaced it is a musical instrument played through contact with water. The interactive installations are spread across the paved area in front of the Ontario Science Centre.

Ontario Science Centre
770 Don Mills Road
Planned as a centenary gift to Ontarians during the mass expansion of Toronto in the 1950s and 1960s, the Ontario Science Centre has been a prominent architectural presence in Flemingdon Park since 1969. Raymond Moriyama, a Toronto architect of Japanese descent, designed the building in the Brutalist style, known for its minimalism and industrial elements. This and other examples of Brutalism signalled a shift in Canadian architecture more broadly, with the rise of geometric designs becoming more widespread. The Ontario Science Centre was a trailblazing institution when it came to interactivity and science. The three-building complex is connected via bridges and escalators, overlooking the Don River ravine to the west. The Centre also houses Ontario's only IMAX Dome, different from other IMAX screens (such as Ontario Place's Cinesphere) in that it actually projects onto the domed surface inside the theatre.

John Tuzo Wilson Plaque
770 Don Mills Road
Mounted next to the Ontario Science Centre's front entrance doors, two blue plaques honour the late John Tuzo Wilson, a geophysicist and geologist who was internationally renowned for his explanation of plate tectonics. Born in Ottawa and educated at the University of Toronto, University of Cambridge, and Princeton University, Wilson served in the Canadian army during the Second World War. He pioneered the use of aerial photos in geological mapping, and was the second Canadian to fly over the North Pole. A pioneering geologist in many areas, Wilson was also responsible for creating the first glacial map of Canada. After retiring in 1974, Wilson served as director general of the Ontario Science Centre until 1985, where he famously had 'Please Touch' labels posted with the exhibits.

Ferrand Drive Park
251 Ferrand Drive
Ferrand Drive Park is a small, sheltered green space with a children's playground and gazebo for public use.

Toronto Public Library - Flemingdon Park Branch
29 St Dennis Drive
Situated in the heart of the Flemingdon Park neighbourhood, the Toronto Public Library's Flemingdon Park Branch is a community hub offering services such as the library catalogue, electronic equipment, and meeting rooms. The building was designed by Bregman and Hamann Architects and was completed in 1981. It was refurbished in 1997 by Makrimichalos Cugini Architects, and now features a youth hub. The branch is also home to the Dennis R. Timbrell Resource Centre, with community facilities such as an auditorium, computer room, gymnasium, weights room, swimming pool, licensed day care onsite, and all-ages public programming, especially youth-specific programs.

Explore Flemingdon Park

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Kate Nankervis
Toronto Public Library: Don Mills Branch
888 Lawrence Ave E, North York, ON M3C 1P6

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This stroll explores the sprawling green spaces and community feel of the Flemingdon Park neighbourhood, from the impressive silhouette of the Ontario Science Centre to the creative presence of public artists on Don Mills Road. Learn about women's hockey history at the Angela James Arena, or experiment with some interactive installations at the TELUScape Plaza.

Main Streets: Don Mills Road
  1. Linkwood Lane Park
    10 Linkwood Lane
    This 2-hectare park features a ball diamond, a multipurpose sports field and a children's playground. Just around the corner from the park is the Linkwood Lane Dog Park and Vendome Basketball Court (on Grenoble Drive), both of which are publicly accessible.
  2. Flemingdon Park Community Centre
    150 Grenoble Drive
    The Flemingdon Park Community Centre offers programs and facilities including indoor and outdoor playgrounds, a picnic area, a splash pad, a community garden, and outdoor courts and fields. After-school programs and adult fitness programs are also available. The community centre also houses a Playground Paradise, an indoor playground structure for children up to age 12.
  3. Angela James Arena
    165 Grenoble Drive
    Angela James Arena is a recreation facility housing a hockey arena. Named after Canadian hockey player Angela James in 2009, the arena celebrates her achievements in bringing women's hockey to the forefront of public awareness. Having grown up in the Flemingdon Park neighbourhood, James led the Canadian women's hockey team to four world championships in 1990, 1992, 1994, and 1997. Known as the first superstar of women's hockey, she was one of the first three women - and the first Black player - to be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2010. James was also the first openly gay player to be inducted. Having achieved international success during her career, she is a certified referee and has coached numerous women's hockey teams.
  4. E.T. Seton Park Archery Range & Disc Golf Course
    Don Mills Road & Gateway Boulevard North
    The Don River runs through E. T. Seton Park, situated behind the Ontario Science Centre and named after Ernest Thompson Seton. Seton was a British author and naturalist who spent a significant part of his childhood in the Don Valley. The park connects the Flemingdon Park neighbourhood to Thorncliffe Park to the west. It contains multiple walking, jogging, and cycling paths, as well as an archery range (one of only two public ranges in Canada), disc golf course, nordic skiing and equestrian trails.
  5. Charles Weiss 'Dreamers Worldview' Artbox
    Don Mills Road & St Dennis Drive
    'Dreamers Worldview' depicts many clouds with a round head with eyes covered by a revolving image reel. Every person dreams and likes the idea of seeing the world around them.
  6. TELUScape Discovery Plaza
    752 Don Mills Road
    The TELUScape Discovery Plaza was designed by Reich + Petch and EDA Collaborative, and opened to the public in 2006. Comprising a number of outdoor installations such as the 300-foot polished granite 'Lotic Meander' by Stacey Levy, the Plaza also includes the world's largest hydraulophone, by installation artist Steve Mann. Formerly a large fountain in front of the Ontario Science Centre, the hydraulophone that has replaced it is a musical instrument played through contact with water. The interactive installations are spread across the paved area in front of the Ontario Science Centre.
  7. Ontario Science Centre
    770 Don Mills Road
    Planned as a centenary gift to Ontarians during the mass expansion of Toronto in the 1950s and 1960s, the Ontario Science Centre has been a prominent architectural presence in Flemingdon Park since 1969. Raymond Moriyama, a Toronto architect of Japanese descent, designed the building in the Brutalist style, known for its minimalism and industrial elements. This and other examples of Brutalism signalled a shift in Canadian architecture more broadly, with the rise of geometric designs becoming more widespread. The Ontario Science Centre was a trailblazing institution when it came to interactivity and science. The three-building complex is connected via bridges and escalators, overlooking the Don River ravine to the west. The Centre also houses Ontario's only IMAX Dome, different from other IMAX screens (such as Ontario Place's Cinesphere) in that it actually projects onto the domed surface inside the theatre.
  8. John Tuzo Wilson Plaque
    770 Don Mills Road
    Mounted next to the Ontario Science Centre's front entrance doors, two blue plaques honour the late John Tuzo Wilson, a geophysicist and geologist who was internationally renowned for his explanation of plate tectonics. Born in Ottawa and educated at the University of Toronto, University of Cambridge, and Princeton University, Wilson served in the Canadian army during the Second World War. He pioneered the use of aerial photos in geological mapping, and was the second Canadian to fly over the North Pole. A pioneering geologist in many areas, Wilson was also responsible for creating the first glacial map of Canada. After retiring in 1974, Wilson served as director general of the Ontario Science Centre until 1985, where he famously had 'Please Touch' labels posted with the exhibits.
  9. Ferrand Drive Park
    251 Ferrand Drive
    Ferrand Drive Park is a small, sheltered green space with a children's playground and gazebo for public use.
  10. Toronto Public Library - Flemingdon Park Branch
    29 St Dennis Drive
    Situated in the heart of the Flemingdon Park neighbourhood, the Toronto Public Library's Flemingdon Park Branch is a community hub offering services such as the library catalogue, electronic equipment, and meeting rooms. The building was designed by Bregman and Hamann Architects and was completed in 1981. It was refurbished in 1997 by Makrimichalos Cugini Architects, and now features a youth hub. The branch is also home to the Dennis R. Timbrell Resource Centre, with community facilities such as an auditorium, computer room, gymnasium, weights room, swimming pool, licensed day care onsite, and all-ages public programming, especially youth-specific programs.

Accessibility information: All of the locations are visible from the sidewalk. This stroll is mainly flat with a few inclined sections and stops on a busy road (Don Mills Road). Stroll stops will point out parks that may include uneven terrain and/or narrow trails. Exercise caution when exploring these stops.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.