Henry Farm

Betty Sutherland Trail
Along the East Don River (near the intersection of Leslie Street and Sheppard Avenue East)
The Betty Sutherland Trail meanders along parts of the East Don River near Sheppard Avenue East and Leslie Street. It's named after Betty Sutherland, a former member of City Council and the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA). Sutherland was devoted to the improvement of recreation facilities within Toronto. The Betty Sutherland Park is one of a series of parks along this trail and the East Don River. Bird watching is a popular pastime within the park and along the trail. Stop by and take a stroll along the Don to see the variety of wildlife that can still found in the area. There is a plaque further south along the trail in the St. Andrew-Windfields neighbourhood that notes more information about Betty Sutherland.

Havenbrook Park
15 Havenbrook Boulevard
A 5-hectare park near Don Mills Road and Sheppard Avenue East that features a ball diamond, four lit outdoor tennis courts with a clubhouse and a children's playground. The tennis courts are home to the Henry Farm Tennis Club. There is also a trail down to the Don River East branch and the Betty Sutherland Trail.

Henry Mulholland Cairn
Adjacent to 10 Manorpark Court
This cairn was installed in honour of Henry Mulholland, one of the first European settlers in this area. Mulholland immigrated here from County Monaghan, Ireland in 1806 and took on a grant of four hundred acres to farm the site. He also fought in the War of 1812, and later returned to Ireland to try and convince others to make the move across the Atlantic. Mulholland perished in a shipwreck when returning to Canada in 1833. Descendants of his family erected this plaque in 1937, and continue to maintain the green space surrounding it.

George S. Henry House - Oriole Lodge
17 Manorpark Court
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. The core of this heritage-designated house was originally constructed in 1840 by Stillwell Willson, who owned a sawmill nearby. It was then acquired in 1898 by George S. Henry - great grandson of Henry Mulholland - who made several additions to the property and turned it into a successful dairy farm. It became known as Oriole Lodge because of the flocks of oriole birds that could be spotted in a nearby orchard. George S. Henry went on to become a politician, serving in the Ontario Legislature from 1913 to 1943 and serving as Premier of Ontario from 1930 to 1934. Henry sold his farmland to developers for two million dollars in 1958, but then passed away only 10 days later. There is a historical plaque honouring Henry located on the grounds of a nearby church at 80 George Henry Boulevard.

'Connections' Mural
West side of Don Mills Road (near its intersection of Helen Lu Road)
This mural was created by Mural Routes in 2016 as a Signature Project of the Cultural Hotspot. The design works with the existing grooves of the retaining wall to create an array of coloured blocks, interspersed with textile patterns from around the world. The mural represents the connectivity of North York's diverse cultures and creates a colourful gradient that can be appreciated by pedestrians, cyclists, and drivers alike. The project also included a free Introduction to Mural Art program, during which an intergenerational group of local residents exchanged ideas for the piece while developing mural art skills. The 760-foot mural was painted by Rob Matejka, Tara Dorey, Frances Potts, three youth assistants and numerous volunteers.

Parkway Forest Community Centre
55 Forest Manor Road
This community centre is a large, fully accessible facility featuring a full-size gymnasium, teaching kitchen, fitness/dance studio, weight room, teaching garden and green roof, and five community program rooms. The Parkway Forest Community Centre is within walking distance to Don Mills Subway Station and the Fairview Mall. This centre also has an Enhanced Youth Space (EYS) called Da Lounge.

Parkway Forest Park
80 Parkway Forest Drive
A 5.2-hectare park near Don Mills Road and Sheppard Avenue East that features three lit outdoor tennis courts, a ball diamond, a multipurpose sports field, a basketball court and a ball hockey pad. There are two playgrounds in the park - one located at the north end and one located at the south end.

Douglas Coupland 'Four Seasons'
Southeast corner of Sheppard Avenue East and Don Mills Road
Inspired by coloured pencils, these four large brightly coloured, striped cones that range from 48 to 60 feet in height were created in 2014 by Douglas Coupland. Each cone represents one of the four seasons, starting with the fall - the tallest and most prominent cone at the corner of Sheppard Avenue East and Don Mills Road. The rest of the cones are placed intermittently, continuing toward Forest Manor Road. The colour palettes of the sculptures vary, reflecting the different seasons. More of Coupland's work can be found in the area, including at the Don Mills subway station entrance and at Parkway Forest Community Centre at 55 Forest Manor Road.

Highway 404
Viewable from the Sheppard Avenue East Overpass (between Fairview Mall Drive and Yorkland Road)
*Note: Use caution when observing the highway and the surrounding roadways. Highway 404 acts as an extension of the Don Valley Parkway, connecting Toronto to near Keswick. It was largely constructed in the 1970s and 1980s, reaching Newmarket in 1989. High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes have been installed on the highway since the mid-2000s in order to relieve traffic congestion. These lanes have been successful, carrying about 1,300 vehicles per hour during rush hour periods. Further extensions of the highway undertaken in the 2010s have expanded its reach to Ravenshoe Road in Keswick.

Jed Lind 'Mariner'
2025 Sheppard Avenue East
Standing tall at 16 feet, 'Mariner' creates a mesmeric landmark in the nearby development and enriches the Yorkland Road streetscape. Bold and beautiful, it consists of a series of angled geometric planes built up in an open-sided structure. Within the structure are a range of flat and perforated pieces, forming patterns that look almost like fragile lace at the top. Painted in gleaming white that shimmers in the daytime and lights up dramatically at night, this work of art will, undoubtedly, provide the public with an exciting new experience. Mariner symbolizes 'a vessel that contains our emotions ranging from hope and despair, but ultimately to possibilities,' Lind declares. It finds its inspiration in the folded paper Dymaxion maps developed by the late American architect Buckminster Fuller to represent our world as one island in one ocean. At the same time, the work refers to a crucial moment between 1967 and 1968 when the first early images of space exploration returned to earth. These images changed the perception of space, cartography, and the unknown, and served as a reminder of the earth's splendid isolation and delicate fragility.

Armenian Community Centre
45 Hallcrown Place
This community centre, which describes itself as the 'hub of the Toronto-Armenian community', first opened its doors in 1979. The complex includes several facilities that all cater to the Armenian community in Toronto, including the Armenian Youth Centre, ARS Armenian Private School, the St. Mary Armenian Apostolic Church, and many local chapters of national and international community organizations. There have been four waves of Armenian immigration to Canada, stretching from the First World War to the present day. Armenian immigrants to Toronto originally established schools, places of worship, and community centres in several spots across the city, most notably in the Dupont Street and Avenue Road area. As the number of Armenians in Toronto rose, this property was purchased to provide more space for the growing community. Today, the centre serves the approximately fifty thousand Canadian-Armenians living in the Greater Toronto Area.

Explore Henry Farm

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Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Women Paint
Toronto Public Library: Bayview Branch
2901 Bayview Ave, North York, ON M2K 1E6

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

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On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
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We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This neighbourhood's name harkens back to its long history as a farmstead. Two Henrys played a key role in the development of this area: Henry Mulholland, an Irish immigrant who was among the first European settlers here, and George S. Henry, a dairy farmer and politician who was the 10th Premier of Ontario in the 1930s. After George S. Henry sold to developers in the 1950s, the idyllic farmland was transformed into the dynamic urban neighbourhood it is today, with a mix of suburban homes and towering buildings scattered throughout. Fantastic local businesses can be found along Sheppard Avenue East, Consumers Road, and Parkway Forest Drive.

Main Streets: Sheppard Avenue East, Consumers Road and Parkway Forest Drive
  1. Betty Sutherland Trail
    Along the East Don River (near the intersection of Leslie Street and Sheppard Avenue East)
    The Betty Sutherland Trail meanders along parts of the East Don River near Sheppard Avenue East and Leslie Street. It's named after Betty Sutherland, a former member of City Council and the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA). Sutherland was devoted to the improvement of recreation facilities within Toronto. The Betty Sutherland Park is one of a series of parks along this trail and the East Don River. Bird watching is a popular pastime within the park and along the trail. Stop by and take a stroll along the Don to see the variety of wildlife that can still found in the area. There is a plaque further south along the trail in the St. Andrew-Windfields neighbourhood that notes more information about Betty Sutherland.
  2. Havenbrook Park
    15 Havenbrook Boulevard
    A 5-hectare park near Don Mills Road and Sheppard Avenue East that features a ball diamond, four lit outdoor tennis courts with a clubhouse and a children's playground. The tennis courts are home to the Henry Farm Tennis Club. There is also a trail down to the Don River East branch and the Betty Sutherland Trail.
  3. Henry Mulholland Cairn
    Adjacent to 10 Manorpark Court
    This cairn was installed in honour of Henry Mulholland, one of the first European settlers in this area. Mulholland immigrated here from County Monaghan, Ireland in 1806 and took on a grant of four hundred acres to farm the site. He also fought in the War of 1812, and later returned to Ireland to try and convince others to make the move across the Atlantic. Mulholland perished in a shipwreck when returning to Canada in 1833. Descendants of his family erected this plaque in 1937, and continue to maintain the green space surrounding it.
  4. George S. Henry House - Oriole Lodge
    17 Manorpark Court
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. The core of this heritage-designated house was originally constructed in 1840 by Stillwell Willson, who owned a sawmill nearby. It was then acquired in 1898 by George S. Henry - great grandson of Henry Mulholland - who made several additions to the property and turned it into a successful dairy farm. It became known as Oriole Lodge because of the flocks of oriole birds that could be spotted in a nearby orchard. George S. Henry went on to become a politician, serving in the Ontario Legislature from 1913 to 1943 and serving as Premier of Ontario from 1930 to 1934. Henry sold his farmland to developers for two million dollars in 1958, but then passed away only 10 days later. There is a historical plaque honouring Henry located on the grounds of a nearby church at 80 George Henry Boulevard.
  5. 'Connections' Mural
    West side of Don Mills Road (near its intersection of Helen Lu Road)
    This mural was created by Mural Routes in 2016 as a Signature Project of the Cultural Hotspot. The design works with the existing grooves of the retaining wall to create an array of coloured blocks, interspersed with textile patterns from around the world. The mural represents the connectivity of North York's diverse cultures and creates a colourful gradient that can be appreciated by pedestrians, cyclists, and drivers alike. The project also included a free Introduction to Mural Art program, during which an intergenerational group of local residents exchanged ideas for the piece while developing mural art skills. The 760-foot mural was painted by Rob Matejka, Tara Dorey, Frances Potts, three youth assistants and numerous volunteers.
  6. Parkway Forest Community Centre
    55 Forest Manor Road
    This community centre is a large, fully accessible facility featuring a full-size gymnasium, teaching kitchen, fitness/dance studio, weight room, teaching garden and green roof, and five community program rooms. The Parkway Forest Community Centre is within walking distance to Don Mills Subway Station and the Fairview Mall. This centre also has an Enhanced Youth Space (EYS) called Da Lounge.
  7. Parkway Forest Park
    80 Parkway Forest Drive
    A 5.2-hectare park near Don Mills Road and Sheppard Avenue East that features three lit outdoor tennis courts, a ball diamond, a multipurpose sports field, a basketball court and a ball hockey pad. There are two playgrounds in the park - one located at the north end and one located at the south end.
  8. Douglas Coupland 'Four Seasons'
    Southeast corner of Sheppard Avenue East and Don Mills Road
    Inspired by coloured pencils, these four large brightly coloured, striped cones that range from 48 to 60 feet in height were created in 2014 by Douglas Coupland. Each cone represents one of the four seasons, starting with the fall - the tallest and most prominent cone at the corner of Sheppard Avenue East and Don Mills Road. The rest of the cones are placed intermittently, continuing toward Forest Manor Road. The colour palettes of the sculptures vary, reflecting the different seasons. More of Coupland's work can be found in the area, including at the Don Mills subway station entrance and at Parkway Forest Community Centre at 55 Forest Manor Road.
  9. Highway 404
    Viewable from the Sheppard Avenue East Overpass (between Fairview Mall Drive and Yorkland Road)
    *Note: Use caution when observing the highway and the surrounding roadways. Highway 404 acts as an extension of the Don Valley Parkway, connecting Toronto to near Keswick. It was largely constructed in the 1970s and 1980s, reaching Newmarket in 1989. High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes have been installed on the highway since the mid-2000s in order to relieve traffic congestion. These lanes have been successful, carrying about 1,300 vehicles per hour during rush hour periods. Further extensions of the highway undertaken in the 2010s have expanded its reach to Ravenshoe Road in Keswick.
  10. Jed Lind 'Mariner'
    2025 Sheppard Avenue East
    Standing tall at 16 feet, 'Mariner' creates a mesmeric landmark in the nearby development and enriches the Yorkland Road streetscape. Bold and beautiful, it consists of a series of angled geometric planes built up in an open-sided structure. Within the structure are a range of flat and perforated pieces, forming patterns that look almost like fragile lace at the top. Painted in gleaming white that shimmers in the daytime and lights up dramatically at night, this work of art will, undoubtedly, provide the public with an exciting new experience. Mariner symbolizes 'a vessel that contains our emotions ranging from hope and despair, but ultimately to possibilities,' Lind declares. It finds its inspiration in the folded paper Dymaxion maps developed by the late American architect Buckminster Fuller to represent our world as one island in one ocean. At the same time, the work refers to a crucial moment between 1967 and 1968 when the first early images of space exploration returned to earth. These images changed the perception of space, cartography, and the unknown, and served as a reminder of the earth's splendid isolation and delicate fragility.
  11. Armenian Community Centre
    45 Hallcrown Place
    This community centre, which describes itself as the 'hub of the Toronto-Armenian community', first opened its doors in 1979. The complex includes several facilities that all cater to the Armenian community in Toronto, including the Armenian Youth Centre, ARS Armenian Private School, the St. Mary Armenian Apostolic Church, and many local chapters of national and international community organizations. There have been four waves of Armenian immigration to Canada, stretching from the First World War to the present day. Armenian immigrants to Toronto originally established schools, places of worship, and community centres in several spots across the city, most notably in the Dupont Street and Avenue Road area. As the number of Armenians in Toronto rose, this property was purchased to provide more space for the growing community. Today, the centre serves the approximately fifty thousand Canadian-Armenians living in the Greater Toronto Area.

Accessibility information: All points of interest on this stroll are viewable from the street. There are some amenities in Parkway Forest Park that require crossing the grass to access.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.