Highland Creek

Toronto PanAm Sports Centre and BGL 'Water Velocity/La Velocite de l'Eau'
875 Morningside Avenue
This centre was originally built for the 2015 Toronto Pan Am and Parapan Am Games. It includes two Olympic-sized swimming pools and a diving well, four full-sized gymnasiums, a fitness centre, a climbing wall, and a 200-metre track. The Toronto Pan Am Sports Centre is a state-of-the-art athletic facility that is open to the public, and is co-owned by the City of Toronto and the University of Toronto. Located right outside the entrance is a public art piece called 'Water Velocity/ La Velocite de l'Eau'. The approximately 11-metre-tall sculpture is designed by Quebec City-based collective BGL (Jasmin Bilodeau, Sebastien Giguere and Nicolas Laverdiere). It's inspired by the swimming pool lanes found in the Sports Centre's two Olympic-sized pools. The metal flaps are sensitive to the wind and are meant to mimic the flicker of light on water. The artists describe 'Water Velocity' as, 'a curious encounter between monumental sculpture, kinetic installation and Optic Art.'

Instructional Centre and Daniel Young and Christian Giroux 'Interregnum: Corner Displacement'
1095 Military Trail
This is the first building on the University of Toronto's Scarborough Campus. The Instructional Centre is the home to both the Department of Management and Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences and is designed to enhance learning and student life. It has several features including a rooftop garden and Canada's largest undergraduate finance lab (which resembles a high-tech trading floor). Located in the atrium is the campus' largest art commission 'Interregnum: Corner Displacement'. The geometric sculpture responds to and complements the architectural features of the building. It was designed by Daniel Young and Christian Giroux. Young and Giroux were the recipients of the prestigious Sobey Art Award in 2011.

Dani Coghlan Artbox
Ellesmere Road & Military Trail
Dragonflies are fast-flying protectors and pollinators that curtail the spread of malaria, yellow fever, dog heartworms, and tularemia. By eating mosquitoes, and horse and deer flies, they reduce the use of pesticides that kill disease-spreading insects. On the front of the artbox is a dragonfly preying a mosquito. Fire symbolizes solar energy that dragonfly wings rely on for rapid maneuvering. Blue symbolizes air. On the back of the artbox, blue energy lines present dragonflies as ecological signifiers of healthy and unhealthy fresh water.

Old Danforth Road
Military Trail and Ellesmere Road
In 1799 Asa Danforth, an American contractor, built a provincial highway that was 18 kilometres in length and led from the east end of King Street all the way to the mouth of the River Trent. It was useful as a farm-to-market route until much of the route was consumed by suburban development. Today, Queen Street East, Clonmore Drive, Painted Post Drive and Military Trail all make up portions of the former route of Danforth Road. Today's Danforth Avenue is also named after Asa.

University of Toronto's Scarborough Campus
1265 Military Trail
In 1964 Scarborough College, part of the University of Toronto's Faculty of Arts and Science, was founded. Today, it is a satellite campus of the University of Toronto (U of T) and was originally designed by U of T Professor and renowned Australian architect John Andrews, who is best known in Canada for designing the CN Tower. The Scarborough Campus is known for its architecture, with excellent examples of Brutalist and Modernist style buildings. Many innovative contemporary structures also exist, making the campus an inspiring place for students.

Andrews Building at the University of Toronto's Scarborough Campus
1265 Military Trail
The Andrews Building, another building on University of Toronto Scarborough Campus (UTSC) designed by John Andrews, attracted worldwide attention when it opened to students in 1966. Now known as the Science and Humanities Wings, the Brutalist megastructure quickly became a UTSC icon. Within the buildings poured-concrete walls, filmmaker David Cronenberg shot his first full-length film 'Stereo'. The building has also been featured in 'Shadowhunters', 'The Expanse', 'Killjoys', 'Hannibal', and Academy Award winning film 'The Shape of Water'. Over the last decade, stunning new buildings, such as the Student Centre and the Instructional Centre, have formed a spectacular built landscape at UTSC.

Louis Archambault 'A Tall Couple', Art Spaces in Andrews Building, and Valley Land Trail
1265 Military Trail
'A Tall Couple', created by Louis Archambault, is a bronze sculpture that was commissioned for Expo '67 in Montreal. Later donated to UTSC, the sculpture uses abstracted, modernist forms, which complement the modernist buildings of the campus. It was the first artwork to be acquired for the Doris McCarthy Gallery Permanent Collection, located in the Andrews Building, which now has over 1,600 contemporary artworks by Canadian and international artists. Found inside the building is the Doris McCarthy Gallery, a professional art gallery dedicated to the collection, presentation and dissemination of contemporary art in all media. Also in the building is Gallery 1265 (a student gallery) and the Leigha Lee Browne Theatre, which has been a public performance venue since 1993. Right beside 'A Tall Couple' is the Valley Land Trail, a beautifully scenic and wheelchair-accessible trail that features a charging station for motorized accessibility devices and benches.

Highland Creek Public School
1410 Military Trail
This building has operated as a public school for over a century. Originally built in 1918, the two-room school served both the West Hill and Highland Creek communities. More rooms were added in 1940s and 1950s. The original section in the front was completed by building company John C. Morrish and Sons, and masons Roger and William Pearce. The Morrish and Pearce families had a great impact on the building of the Highland Creek Village, including W.J. Morrish Store, as well a number of inns, stores and schools.

Rob Gill Artbox
Old Kingston Road & Military Trail
This artbox showcases a single maze with no entrance or exit that covers the entire box. The maze is a universal and simple form that engages at many levels, accessible to anyone archaic and archetypal.

History of Morrish Road
362 Old Kingston Road
Morrish Road is named after the Morrish family of Highland Creek, who were prominent merchants throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This Heritage-designated two-storey building that now forms part of a strip mall was once one of several stores that they owned and operated in the area.

John Hood 'Community Spirit in Highland Creek' Mural
382 Old Kingston Road
Painted by artist John Hood, this mural depicts a scene of members of the community working together to build an addition to the Wesley Methodist Chapel in winter of 1867. Today, the church building is no longer there but the heritage-listed Highland Creek Cemetery remains.

Scarborough Archives
6282 Kingston Road
The Scarborough Archives is operated by the Scarborough Historical Society, which has been serving the Scarborough community since 1956. It strives to preserve, study and stimulate an interest in the history of Scarborough. The beautiful building was originally constructed in 1891 as a general store and residence for prominent Highland Creek merchant William J. Morrish. Visit this historical architectural gem and hear fascinating stories about the building. The Scarborough Archives has items that you may examine in person, including local newspapers from the 1880s and historic photographs. All site visits are by appointment only.

Bramber Woods Park
15 Bramer Road
A 2.2-hectare tree lined park featuring gravel walking paths, a children's playground and an open green space area.

Highland Creek Community Park
3500 Ellesmere Road
A 3.33-hectare park surrounded by trees with a parking lot and paved pathway leading to a ball diamond and playground. The park also has a passive area.

Explore Highland Creek

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

We want to hear from you! Click here to complete a short survey

Suppport small business owners by Shopping Small.

Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Kate Nankervis
Toronto Public Library: Port Union Branch/Port Union Community Recreation Centre
5450 Lawrence Ave E, Scarborough, ON M1C 3B2

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

Take a stroll through the historic Highland Creek neighbourhood, which features a mixture of local businesses, historic buildings and residential streets highlighted by beautiful lush green spaces along Kingston Road. Stroll along Military Trail to learn about this neighbourhood's history and then head to University of Toronto's Scarborough Campus, which features a change of scene with art pieces and a monumental athletic centre. Great local businesses can be found along Kingston Road, Old Kingston Road, and Ellesmere Road.

Main Streets: Kingston Road, Ellesmere Road and Old Kingston Road
  1. Toronto PanAm Sports Centre and BGL 'Water Velocity/La Velocite de l'Eau'
    875 Morningside Avenue
    This centre was originally built for the 2015 Toronto Pan Am and Parapan Am Games. It includes two Olympic-sized swimming pools and a diving well, four full-sized gymnasiums, a fitness centre, a climbing wall, and a 200-metre track. The Toronto Pan Am Sports Centre is a state-of-the-art athletic facility that is open to the public, and is co-owned by the City of Toronto and the University of Toronto. Located right outside the entrance is a public art piece called 'Water Velocity/ La Velocite de l'Eau'. The approximately 11-metre-tall sculpture is designed by Quebec City-based collective BGL (Jasmin Bilodeau, Sebastien Giguere and Nicolas Laverdiere). It's inspired by the swimming pool lanes found in the Sports Centre's two Olympic-sized pools. The metal flaps are sensitive to the wind and are meant to mimic the flicker of light on water. The artists describe 'Water Velocity' as, 'a curious encounter between monumental sculpture, kinetic installation and Optic Art.'
  2. Instructional Centre and Daniel Young and Christian Giroux 'Interregnum: Corner Displacement'
    1095 Military Trail
    This is the first building on the University of Toronto's Scarborough Campus. The Instructional Centre is the home to both the Department of Management and Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences and is designed to enhance learning and student life. It has several features including a rooftop garden and Canada's largest undergraduate finance lab (which resembles a high-tech trading floor). Located in the atrium is the campus' largest art commission 'Interregnum: Corner Displacement'. The geometric sculpture responds to and complements the architectural features of the building. It was designed by Daniel Young and Christian Giroux. Young and Giroux were the recipients of the prestigious Sobey Art Award in 2011.
  3. Dani Coghlan Artbox
    Ellesmere Road & Military Trail
    Dragonflies are fast-flying protectors and pollinators that curtail the spread of malaria, yellow fever, dog heartworms, and tularemia. By eating mosquitoes, and horse and deer flies, they reduce the use of pesticides that kill disease-spreading insects. On the front of the artbox is a dragonfly preying a mosquito. Fire symbolizes solar energy that dragonfly wings rely on for rapid maneuvering. Blue symbolizes air. On the back of the artbox, blue energy lines present dragonflies as ecological signifiers of healthy and unhealthy fresh water.
  4. Old Danforth Road
    Military Trail and Ellesmere Road
    In 1799 Asa Danforth, an American contractor, built a provincial highway that was 18 kilometres in length and led from the east end of King Street all the way to the mouth of the River Trent. It was useful as a farm-to-market route until much of the route was consumed by suburban development. Today, Queen Street East, Clonmore Drive, Painted Post Drive and Military Trail all make up portions of the former route of Danforth Road. Today's Danforth Avenue is also named after Asa.
  5. University of Toronto's Scarborough Campus
    1265 Military Trail
    In 1964 Scarborough College, part of the University of Toronto's Faculty of Arts and Science, was founded. Today, it is a satellite campus of the University of Toronto (U of T) and was originally designed by U of T Professor and renowned Australian architect John Andrews, who is best known in Canada for designing the CN Tower. The Scarborough Campus is known for its architecture, with excellent examples of Brutalist and Modernist style buildings. Many innovative contemporary structures also exist, making the campus an inspiring place for students.
  6. Andrews Building at the University of Toronto's Scarborough Campus
    1265 Military Trail
    The Andrews Building, another building on University of Toronto Scarborough Campus (UTSC) designed by John Andrews, attracted worldwide attention when it opened to students in 1966. Now known as the Science and Humanities Wings, the Brutalist megastructure quickly became a UTSC icon. Within the buildings poured-concrete walls, filmmaker David Cronenberg shot his first full-length film 'Stereo'. The building has also been featured in 'Shadowhunters', 'The Expanse', 'Killjoys', 'Hannibal', and Academy Award winning film 'The Shape of Water'. Over the last decade, stunning new buildings, such as the Student Centre and the Instructional Centre, have formed a spectacular built landscape at UTSC.
  7. Louis Archambault 'A Tall Couple', Art Spaces in Andrews Building, and Valley Land Trail
    1265 Military Trail
    'A Tall Couple', created by Louis Archambault, is a bronze sculpture that was commissioned for Expo '67 in Montreal. Later donated to UTSC, the sculpture uses abstracted, modernist forms, which complement the modernist buildings of the campus. It was the first artwork to be acquired for the Doris McCarthy Gallery Permanent Collection, located in the Andrews Building, which now has over 1,600 contemporary artworks by Canadian and international artists. Found inside the building is the Doris McCarthy Gallery, a professional art gallery dedicated to the collection, presentation and dissemination of contemporary art in all media. Also in the building is Gallery 1265 (a student gallery) and the Leigha Lee Browne Theatre, which has been a public performance venue since 1993. Right beside 'A Tall Couple' is the Valley Land Trail, a beautifully scenic and wheelchair-accessible trail that features a charging station for motorized accessibility devices and benches.
  8. Highland Creek Public School
    1410 Military Trail
    This building has operated as a public school for over a century. Originally built in 1918, the two-room school served both the West Hill and Highland Creek communities. More rooms were added in 1940s and 1950s. The original section in the front was completed by building company John C. Morrish and Sons, and masons Roger and William Pearce. The Morrish and Pearce families had a great impact on the building of the Highland Creek Village, including W.J. Morrish Store, as well a number of inns, stores and schools.
  9. Rob Gill Artbox
    Old Kingston Road & Military Trail
    This artbox showcases a single maze with no entrance or exit that covers the entire box. The maze is a universal and simple form that engages at many levels, accessible to anyone archaic and archetypal.
  10. History of Morrish Road
    362 Old Kingston Road
    Morrish Road is named after the Morrish family of Highland Creek, who were prominent merchants throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This Heritage-designated two-storey building that now forms part of a strip mall was once one of several stores that they owned and operated in the area.
  11. John Hood 'Community Spirit in Highland Creek' Mural
    382 Old Kingston Road
    Painted by artist John Hood, this mural depicts a scene of members of the community working together to build an addition to the Wesley Methodist Chapel in winter of 1867. Today, the church building is no longer there but the heritage-listed Highland Creek Cemetery remains.
  12. Scarborough Archives
    6282 Kingston Road
    The Scarborough Archives is operated by the Scarborough Historical Society, which has been serving the Scarborough community since 1956. It strives to preserve, study and stimulate an interest in the history of Scarborough. The beautiful building was originally constructed in 1891 as a general store and residence for prominent Highland Creek merchant William J. Morrish. Visit this historical architectural gem and hear fascinating stories about the building. The Scarborough Archives has items that you may examine in person, including local newspapers from the 1880s and historic photographs. All site visits are by appointment only.
  13. Bramber Woods Park
    15 Bramer Road
    A 2.2-hectare tree lined park featuring gravel walking paths, a children's playground and an open green space area.
  14. Highland Creek Community Park
    3500 Ellesmere Road
    A 3.33-hectare park surrounded by trees with a parking lot and paved pathway leading to a ball diamond and playground. The park also has a passive area.

Accessibility information: All points of interest are viewable from paved sidewalks or park paths except for 'Interregnum: Corner Displacement', which is located within the atrium of the Instructional Centre at the University of Toronto's Scarborough Campus.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.