Humewood-Cedarvale

Ben Nobleman Park Community Orchard
1075 Eglinton Avenue West
*Note: Please follow Toronto Public Health's guidelines for visiting community & allotment gardens. This is Toronto's first community orchard in a public park. Planted in 2009, the orchard includes apple, plum, apricot and sweet cherry trees, as well as a pollinator garden. The initiative is run by Growing for Green in partnership with the harvesting project Not Far From the Tree. The orchard is maintained by volunteers, who participate in irrigation, mulching, pruning and harvesting. Once the trees are old enough to grow fruit, harvests are shared with volunteers and local food banks.

Dov Altman Lane
South of Eglinton Avenue West Between Westover Hill Road and Menin Road
This laneway was named after Dov Altman, a local man who was dubbed 'The King of Westover Hill', thanks to his enormous contributions to the community over the years. Altman required a lung transplant, and afterwards devoted much effort and energy into raising awareness of the importance of organ donation. Hundreds of people obliged thanks to his efforts. He was also very active in several Jewish community organizations, leaving a successful career in commercial real estate leasing to take up a position at Canadian Friends of Bar-Ilan University, an organization that helps support a research university in Israel.

Holy Blossom Temple
1950 Bathurst Street
The Holy Blossom Temple is one of the oldest Jewish congregations in Toronto, founded in 1856 as the Toronto Hebrew Congregation. It was formed by two dozen Jewish residents and, today, has over seven thousand members. The congregation has moved a number of times, growing from a small meeting on the upper floor of a downtown drug store, to a new downtown synagogue in 1897, before settling into its current location on Bathurst Street in 1938.

Arlington Parkette & Sousa Mendes Children's Playground and Plaque
460 Arlington Avenue
This park features the Sousa Mendes Playground and a plaque honouring Aristides de Sousa Mendes, a Portuguese diplomat. Sousa Mendes was the Consul General for the Portuguese government in Bordeaux, France in the early 1940s, when thousands of refugees came to the Portuguese Consulate seeking visas to escape France. Portugal was officially neutral in the Second World War, and had instructed its diplomats not to issue visas to refugees. Sousa Mendes defied these orders and issued thousands of visas, saving the lives of approximately 30,000 people (including 12,000 Jews). For this act of defiance, Sousa Mendes was severely punished by the Portuguese government. He was stripped of his diplomatic position, and his children were blacklisted from attending university or finding meaningful work. His family has since fought for decades to have his heroic actions properly recognized. The playground and plaque were unveiled in a 2013 ceremony with members of both the Jewish and Portuguese communities present.

Cedarvale Park
443 Arlington Avenue
Cedarvale Park is a hub of activity with sports fields, playgrounds and very steep hills ideal for tobogganing. The south end of the park contains a ravine, wetlands, and a young regrowth forest.

Cedarvale Ravine
In Cedarvale Park, Stretching from Ava Road to Bathurst Street
Cedarvale Park is part of an extensive ravine trail across midtown Toronto. On the south end of the park is the Cedarvale Stream, a reach of the now-buried Castle Frank Ravine and tributary of the Don River that borders Toronto's east end. The park is also notable as a favourite spot of American literary icon Ernest Hemingway, who frequented it when he lived nearby for approximately eight months in the 1920s. The ravine was almost destroyed in the 1960s when plans for the Spadina Expressway routed through it. Widespread community opposition halted the expressway entirely, and in the mid-1970s, plans were made to construct a subway through the ravine instead. Today, the section of the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) Line 1 subway from St. Clair West to Eglinton West Stations runs right under the ravine, and some of its emergency exits can be spotted by those looking closely while strolling through.

Glen Cedar Bridge
Above Cedarvale Ravine Between the Intersections of Glen Cedar Road and Strathearn Road, and Glen Cedar Road and Heathdale Road
This heritage-designated footbridge is a replica of one originally built here in 1912 by Sir Henry Mill Pellatt, the builder of Casa Loma. Pellatt constructed the bridge in order to open up the area north of the ravine for development. Originally a bridge for cars, it was turned into a pedestrian bridge in 1973 due to safety concerns. The bridge was almost destroyed in the 1980s but the local community successfully rallied for its reconstruction (which took place in 1989).

Connaught Gates
Intersection of Claxton Boulevard and Bathurst Street
These heritage-designated gates were constructed by Sir Henry Mill Pellatt in 1913 with the intention of acting as a grand entrance to Cedar Vale, a proposed new residential neighbourhood development. Pellatt envisioned Cedar Vale to be an exclusive enclave along the ravine that would rival Rosedale in grandeur and natural beauty. Unfortunately for Pellatt, the First World War broke out soon after and his plans failed to come to fruition. While the area did subsequently develop over the ensuing years into a residential neighbourhood, these gates are all that remain from Pellatt's original ambitious plans.

Justin Pape Artbox
Northeast corner of Vaughan Road and Kenwood Avenue
Raccoons and Toronto go hand in hand. Usually, though, they are seen as pesky bandits. This artbox puts them in a happier light, hanging out in nature and being swept up in various elements of the ravines around the city.

Humewood House
40 Humewood Avenue
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. A large home was originally constructed on this site in 1860 as the home of William and Catherine Hume Blake, who owned an estate that covered much of the surrounding area at this time. Their son Edward Blake, who grew up here, went on to briefly become the second Premier of Ontario, and also the second leader of the Canadian Liberal Party. In 1912, part of the property was sold to a group of women from St. Thomas Anglican Church, who converted it to a home to serve unwed mothers. The house was demolished in 1924 and replaced with the building still standing now, with an addition added in 1960. Today, it is known as Humewood House, and continues to offer valuable services to Toronto's vulnerable single parents and their children.

Humewood Park
37 Humewood Drive
This small park features a tree canopy and a children's playground. There is a plaque in the park that notes the history of its namesake, William Hume Blake. Hume Blake moved to Upper Canada from Ireland in 1832, and became a prominent lawyer, professor, and politician. While serving as Solicitor-General for Canada West, he introduced important legal reforms, such as the reorganization of the Court of Chancery. The park covers an area that was part of Hume Blake's estate, known as Humewood.

Explore Humewood-Cedarvale

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Women Paint
Spadina Museum
285 Spadina Rd, Toronto, ON M5R 2V5

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
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We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This beautiful, historic neighbourhood is largely defined by the Cedarvale Ravine that runs through the area, offering a fantastic natural oasis to its residents. North of the ravine lies the Cedarvale area, which has historic ties to Sir Henry Mill Pellatt of Casa Loma fame, while south of the ravine is Humewood, which was associated with William Blake Hume, a lawyer and politician who owned an estate that covered much of this land previously. Stately homes line the residential streets of this area on both sides of the ravine, and fantastic local businesses can be found along Eglinton Avenue West in the Upper Village BIA.

Main Streets: St. Clair Avenue West, Eglinton Avenue West and Vaughan Road
  1. Ben Nobleman Park Community Orchard
    1075 Eglinton Avenue West
    *Note: Please follow Toronto Public Health's guidelines for visiting community & allotment gardens. This is Toronto's first community orchard in a public park. Planted in 2009, the orchard includes apple, plum, apricot and sweet cherry trees, as well as a pollinator garden. The initiative is run by Growing for Green in partnership with the harvesting project Not Far From the Tree. The orchard is maintained by volunteers, who participate in irrigation, mulching, pruning and harvesting. Once the trees are old enough to grow fruit, harvests are shared with volunteers and local food banks.
  2. Dov Altman Lane
    South of Eglinton Avenue West Between Westover Hill Road and Menin Road
    This laneway was named after Dov Altman, a local man who was dubbed 'The King of Westover Hill', thanks to his enormous contributions to the community over the years. Altman required a lung transplant, and afterwards devoted much effort and energy into raising awareness of the importance of organ donation. Hundreds of people obliged thanks to his efforts. He was also very active in several Jewish community organizations, leaving a successful career in commercial real estate leasing to take up a position at Canadian Friends of Bar-Ilan University, an organization that helps support a research university in Israel.
  3. Holy Blossom Temple
    1950 Bathurst Street
    The Holy Blossom Temple is one of the oldest Jewish congregations in Toronto, founded in 1856 as the Toronto Hebrew Congregation. It was formed by two dozen Jewish residents and, today, has over seven thousand members. The congregation has moved a number of times, growing from a small meeting on the upper floor of a downtown drug store, to a new downtown synagogue in 1897, before settling into its current location on Bathurst Street in 1938.
  4. Arlington Parkette & Sousa Mendes Children's Playground and Plaque
    460 Arlington Avenue
    This park features the Sousa Mendes Playground and a plaque honouring Aristides de Sousa Mendes, a Portuguese diplomat. Sousa Mendes was the Consul General for the Portuguese government in Bordeaux, France in the early 1940s, when thousands of refugees came to the Portuguese Consulate seeking visas to escape France. Portugal was officially neutral in the Second World War, and had instructed its diplomats not to issue visas to refugees. Sousa Mendes defied these orders and issued thousands of visas, saving the lives of approximately 30,000 people (including 12,000 Jews). For this act of defiance, Sousa Mendes was severely punished by the Portuguese government. He was stripped of his diplomatic position, and his children were blacklisted from attending university or finding meaningful work. His family has since fought for decades to have his heroic actions properly recognized. The playground and plaque were unveiled in a 2013 ceremony with members of both the Jewish and Portuguese communities present.
  5. Cedarvale Park
    443 Arlington Avenue
    Cedarvale Park is a hub of activity with sports fields, playgrounds and very steep hills ideal for tobogganing. The south end of the park contains a ravine, wetlands, and a young regrowth forest.
  6. Cedarvale Ravine
    In Cedarvale Park, Stretching from Ava Road to Bathurst Street
    Cedarvale Park is part of an extensive ravine trail across midtown Toronto. On the south end of the park is the Cedarvale Stream, a reach of the now-buried Castle Frank Ravine and tributary of the Don River that borders Toronto's east end. The park is also notable as a favourite spot of American literary icon Ernest Hemingway, who frequented it when he lived nearby for approximately eight months in the 1920s. The ravine was almost destroyed in the 1960s when plans for the Spadina Expressway routed through it. Widespread community opposition halted the expressway entirely, and in the mid-1970s, plans were made to construct a subway through the ravine instead. Today, the section of the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) Line 1 subway from St. Clair West to Eglinton West Stations runs right under the ravine, and some of its emergency exits can be spotted by those looking closely while strolling through.
  7. Glen Cedar Bridge
    Above Cedarvale Ravine Between the Intersections of Glen Cedar Road and Strathearn Road, and Glen Cedar Road and Heathdale Road
    This heritage-designated footbridge is a replica of one originally built here in 1912 by Sir Henry Mill Pellatt, the builder of Casa Loma. Pellatt constructed the bridge in order to open up the area north of the ravine for development. Originally a bridge for cars, it was turned into a pedestrian bridge in 1973 due to safety concerns. The bridge was almost destroyed in the 1980s but the local community successfully rallied for its reconstruction (which took place in 1989).
  8. Connaught Gates
    Intersection of Claxton Boulevard and Bathurst Street
    These heritage-designated gates were constructed by Sir Henry Mill Pellatt in 1913 with the intention of acting as a grand entrance to Cedar Vale, a proposed new residential neighbourhood development. Pellatt envisioned Cedar Vale to be an exclusive enclave along the ravine that would rival Rosedale in grandeur and natural beauty. Unfortunately for Pellatt, the First World War broke out soon after and his plans failed to come to fruition. While the area did subsequently develop over the ensuing years into a residential neighbourhood, these gates are all that remain from Pellatt's original ambitious plans.
  9. Justin Pape Artbox
    Northeast corner of Vaughan Road and Kenwood Avenue
    Raccoons and Toronto go hand in hand. Usually, though, they are seen as pesky bandits. This artbox puts them in a happier light, hanging out in nature and being swept up in various elements of the ravines around the city.
  10. Humewood House
    40 Humewood Avenue
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. A large home was originally constructed on this site in 1860 as the home of William and Catherine Hume Blake, who owned an estate that covered much of the surrounding area at this time. Their son Edward Blake, who grew up here, went on to briefly become the second Premier of Ontario, and also the second leader of the Canadian Liberal Party. In 1912, part of the property was sold to a group of women from St. Thomas Anglican Church, who converted it to a home to serve unwed mothers. The house was demolished in 1924 and replaced with the building still standing now, with an addition added in 1960. Today, it is known as Humewood House, and continues to offer valuable services to Toronto's vulnerable single parents and their children.
  11. Humewood Park
    37 Humewood Drive
    This small park features a tree canopy and a children's playground. There is a plaque in the park that notes the history of its namesake, William Hume Blake. Hume Blake moved to Upper Canada from Ireland in 1832, and became a prominent lawyer, professor, and politician. While serving as Solicitor-General for Canada West, he introduced important legal reforms, such as the reorganization of the Court of Chancery. The park covers an area that was part of Hume Blake's estate, known as Humewood.

Accessibility information: Most points of interest in this stroll are visible from the street. Parts of Cedarvale Park and Cedarvale Ravine contain unpaved paths, steep hills, and uneven surfaces. The Glen Cedar Bridge can only be accessed from the floor of the ravine via a large staircase. Stairless access to the bridge can be found from the south near the intersection of Glen Cedar Road and Heathdale Road, or from the north near the intersection of Glen Cedar Road and Strathearn Avenue.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.