Keelesdale-Eglinton West

Christiano de Araujo & Natasha Dichpan 'See the Forest for the Trees' Mural
North side of Rogers Road between Silverthorn Avenue and Blackthorn Avenue
'See the Forest for the Trees' is a spectacular mural by artists Christiano de Araujo and Natasha Dichpan. It adorns the side of a retaining wall along Rogers Road, spanning an amazing 178 feet, and is 12 feet tall in some parts (the mural is approximately 2,136 square feet in its entirety). The mural was painted in October and November 2018 - de Araujo noted that the paint froze frequently due to the chilly weather at the time. De Araujo and Dichpan said they wanted to create a mural that reflected the feel and diversity of the neighbourhood, depicting trees and the community coming together and growing together.

Saint George Romanian Orthodox Church
247 Rosethorn Avenue
This Romanian Orthodox church serves the Romanian-Canadian community, of which there are about thirty thousand living in the Toronto area. Romanian immigrants first began arriving in Canada in the late 1800s, mostly settling in the Prairie provinces and Quebec. A large influx of Romanian immigrants arrived in Toronto after the Second World War, and members of the community began planning to create a new Romanian Orthodox Church in their new home. The congregation first operated out of a rented building on Broadview Avenue in Toronto's east end. As more members joined, they were able to purchase this building - a former Anglican church - in 1970. The church has been extensively redecorated in traditional orthodox style over the years, including in the late 1990s when Romanian iconographer Nicolae Enachi hand-painted the entire interior. The congregation celebrated their 65th anniversary in 2019.

Rogers Road Streetcar
Rogers Road and Bicknell Avenue
This intersection of Rogers Road and Bicknell Avenue was once the terminus of a streetcar line that ran along Rogers Road. The former streetcar line was one of three new routes opened in this area in the 1920s. It ran from here to the intersection of St. Clair Avenue West and Oakwood Avenue - where a streetcar loop is still used by the 512 St. Clair line. In the late 1960s, the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) adopted an official policy of eliminating its entire streetcar network by 1980, a policy that was reversed under intense community pressure in 1972. However, there was a shortage of streetcars in good condition at this time, and the Rogers Road route was selected as one to be eliminated, taking its last run in July 1974. The last surviving remnant of this route was located here (a loop with a bus shelter), which was demolished in 2017 to make way for a townhouse development.

Toronto Public Library - Evelyn Gregory Branch
120 Trowell Avenue
This Toronto Public Library branch was constructed in the late 1960s when York Township Public Library made plans to construct a branch near the intersection of Keele Street and Trowell Avenue. It was designed by Banz, Brook, Carruthers, Grierson, Shaw Architects, and officially opened in 1968. It is named after Evelyn Gregory, who was the Chief Librarian of York Township/Borough of York Public Library from 1945 to 1969.

Haverson Park
65 Woodenhill Court
This small park on the side of a hill offers nice views of the surrounding area, as well as a children's playground.

Eglinton Hill
Eglinton Avenue West between Venn Crescent and Trethewey Drive
This section of Eglinton Avenue West sits on a dramatic hill that looks more like what one would expect to find when visiting San Francisco. While walking down, an unexpected panoramic vista to the west is visible. One of the original European settlers in this area - Aaron Silverthorn - lived in a farm at the top of the hill near present-day Eglinton Avenue West and Venn Crescent in 1825. Aaron's son Francis turned it into a successful cattle farm, and also operated a successful business selling salt-free and honey-free biscuits. Francis Silverthorn died in 1894, and the area was opened up to residential development in 1914 under the name Silverthorn Heights. Parts of this area remain colloquially known as Silverthorn to this day.

Masjid-El-Noor
277 Scott Road
This striking mosque along Scott Road is home to Masjid-El-Noor, one of the oldest Muslim institutions in Canada, originally established in 1986. The building was initially a church, but was later converted into the towering institution that it is today. The centre can accommodate up to seven hundred worshippers for Friday prayers. The mosque has also developed over the years into a multidimensional community hub offering an extensive repertoire of religious and educational programs and important social services. Masjid-El-Noor also actively collaborates with other Muslim congregations to help organize programs that meet the diverse needs of the community.

Keelesdale South Park
95 Black Creek Drive
Keelesdale South Park contains recreational facilities including the Chris Tonks Arena and York Recreation Centre, and the North Park contains a lit baseball diamond. Black Creek is also visible throughout the park.

Don Maynard 'Wave'
115 Black Creek Drive
'Wave' is a 120-foot-long aluminum sculpture installed in a grassy mound by artist Don Maynard. The sculpture uses organic forms inspired by the movement of water to reference the natural landscape of Toronto. The rippled texture and fissures in the material give the observer the impression of a forceful wave headed for the shoreline.

York Recreation Centre
115 Black Creek Drive
This facility is located beside the west bank of Black Creek. It opened to the public in 2017, and includes a large pool area, gymnasium, fitness studios and multipurpose rooms. It was constructed with extensive input from the community. The York Recreation Centre offers an array of free programs for all ages. The building also features a green roof.

Explore Keelesdale-Eglinton West

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Kate Nankervis
Toronto Public Library: Mount Dennis Branch
1123 Weston Rd, York, ON M6N 3S3

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

Part of this neighbourhood was nicknamed 'Toronto's Secret San Francisco' by writer Shawn Micallef on account of its steep streets, staircases, and unusual views of houses. Check out the many fantastic local businesses while descending the exceptionally steep hill along Eglinton Avenue West as part of the Eglinton Hill BIA, as well as the historic confines of Rogers Road in the Rogers Road BIA.

Main Streets: Eglinton Avenue West, Rogers Road and Keele Street
  1. Christiano de Araujo & Natasha Dichpan 'See the Forest for the Trees' Mural
    North side of Rogers Road between Silverthorn Avenue and Blackthorn Avenue
    'See the Forest for the Trees' is a spectacular mural by artists Christiano de Araujo and Natasha Dichpan. It adorns the side of a retaining wall along Rogers Road, spanning an amazing 178 feet, and is 12 feet tall in some parts (the mural is approximately 2,136 square feet in its entirety). The mural was painted in October and November 2018 - de Araujo noted that the paint froze frequently due to the chilly weather at the time. De Araujo and Dichpan said they wanted to create a mural that reflected the feel and diversity of the neighbourhood, depicting trees and the community coming together and growing together.
  2. Saint George Romanian Orthodox Church
    247 Rosethorn Avenue
    This Romanian Orthodox church serves the Romanian-Canadian community, of which there are about thirty thousand living in the Toronto area. Romanian immigrants first began arriving in Canada in the late 1800s, mostly settling in the Prairie provinces and Quebec. A large influx of Romanian immigrants arrived in Toronto after the Second World War, and members of the community began planning to create a new Romanian Orthodox Church in their new home. The congregation first operated out of a rented building on Broadview Avenue in Toronto's east end. As more members joined, they were able to purchase this building - a former Anglican church - in 1970. The church has been extensively redecorated in traditional orthodox style over the years, including in the late 1990s when Romanian iconographer Nicolae Enachi hand-painted the entire interior. The congregation celebrated their 65th anniversary in 2019.
  3. Rogers Road Streetcar
    Rogers Road and Bicknell Avenue
    This intersection of Rogers Road and Bicknell Avenue was once the terminus of a streetcar line that ran along Rogers Road. The former streetcar line was one of three new routes opened in this area in the 1920s. It ran from here to the intersection of St. Clair Avenue West and Oakwood Avenue - where a streetcar loop is still used by the 512 St. Clair line. In the late 1960s, the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) adopted an official policy of eliminating its entire streetcar network by 1980, a policy that was reversed under intense community pressure in 1972. However, there was a shortage of streetcars in good condition at this time, and the Rogers Road route was selected as one to be eliminated, taking its last run in July 1974. The last surviving remnant of this route was located here (a loop with a bus shelter), which was demolished in 2017 to make way for a townhouse development.
  4. Toronto Public Library - Evelyn Gregory Branch
    120 Trowell Avenue
    This Toronto Public Library branch was constructed in the late 1960s when York Township Public Library made plans to construct a branch near the intersection of Keele Street and Trowell Avenue. It was designed by Banz, Brook, Carruthers, Grierson, Shaw Architects, and officially opened in 1968. It is named after Evelyn Gregory, who was the Chief Librarian of York Township/Borough of York Public Library from 1945 to 1969.
  5. Haverson Park
    65 Woodenhill Court
    This small park on the side of a hill offers nice views of the surrounding area, as well as a children's playground.
  6. Eglinton Hill
    Eglinton Avenue West between Venn Crescent and Trethewey Drive
    This section of Eglinton Avenue West sits on a dramatic hill that looks more like what one would expect to find when visiting San Francisco. While walking down, an unexpected panoramic vista to the west is visible. One of the original European settlers in this area - Aaron Silverthorn - lived in a farm at the top of the hill near present-day Eglinton Avenue West and Venn Crescent in 1825. Aaron's son Francis turned it into a successful cattle farm, and also operated a successful business selling salt-free and honey-free biscuits. Francis Silverthorn died in 1894, and the area was opened up to residential development in 1914 under the name Silverthorn Heights. Parts of this area remain colloquially known as Silverthorn to this day.
  7. Masjid-El-Noor
    277 Scott Road
    This striking mosque along Scott Road is home to Masjid-El-Noor, one of the oldest Muslim institutions in Canada, originally established in 1986. The building was initially a church, but was later converted into the towering institution that it is today. The centre can accommodate up to seven hundred worshippers for Friday prayers. The mosque has also developed over the years into a multidimensional community hub offering an extensive repertoire of religious and educational programs and important social services. Masjid-El-Noor also actively collaborates with other Muslim congregations to help organize programs that meet the diverse needs of the community.
  8. Keelesdale South Park
    95 Black Creek Drive
    Keelesdale South Park contains recreational facilities including the Chris Tonks Arena and York Recreation Centre, and the North Park contains a lit baseball diamond. Black Creek is also visible throughout the park.
  9. Don Maynard 'Wave'
    115 Black Creek Drive
    'Wave' is a 120-foot-long aluminum sculpture installed in a grassy mound by artist Don Maynard. The sculpture uses organic forms inspired by the movement of water to reference the natural landscape of Toronto. The rippled texture and fissures in the material give the observer the impression of a forceful wave headed for the shoreline.
  10. York Recreation Centre
    115 Black Creek Drive
    This facility is located beside the west bank of Black Creek. It opened to the public in 2017, and includes a large pool area, gymnasium, fitness studios and multipurpose rooms. It was constructed with extensive input from the community. The York Recreation Centre offers an array of free programs for all ages. The building also features a green roof.

Accessibility information: Most of the points of interest in this stroll are viewable from the street, except Keelesdale Park South. Keelesdale Park South may also contain unpaved areas. Please note that portions of this neighbourood are situated on extremely steep hills.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.