Kennedy Park

Frank Perna 'A Sense of Place' Mural
2455 Eglinton Avenue East
Designed by Frank Perna, 'A Sense of Place' was painted in 1997 to decorate the entrance of the Kennedy Subway Station. This mural was commissioned with the intention of making Kennedy Station a space that would increase the comfort level of pedestrians and commuters. The mural is spread out over six surfaces, and explores the idea of a sense of place for community in the natural world, highlighting the technology and multiculturalism of Toronto.

Don Montgomery Community Recreation Centre and Grounds
2467 Eglinton Avenue East
Don Montgomery Community Recreation Centre and Grounds is located along Eglinton Avenue East, with easy access to the Kennedy Subway and GO Stations. The centre features a variety of facilities for recreational activities, cultural programming, and resources for youth, children, and seniors. It is also home to Da Block, one of the city's dedicated enhanced youth spaces, providing a supervised space for youth featuring Wi-Fi, games, recording studios, study labs, and free programs. The centre houses two indoor skating rinks, and is named for the late Don Montgomery, a local hockey player who was president of the Scarborough Hockey Association.

Andra Striowski 'Reflections' Mural
520 Brimley Road
Developed by Andra Striowski and painted by youth artists Jaime Bruno, Chanel Cummins, Alanna Hargan, Tessa Sunnasy, and Jaime Vieria, 'Reflections' brightly adorns a brick wall overlooking a parking lot at the intersection of Brimley Road and Eglinton Avenue East. The mural depicts people viewing images in an art gallery, representing the idea that the media has replaced the arts as a major influence in both society and in how individuals perceive themselves. The theme for this mural was chosen by the youth artists, and represents how advertising and media affect the youth of today. Each artist designed and painted an individual piece of the mural as their own commentary on issues such as body image, materialism, and self-reflection. This project was done in partnership with Action for Neighbourhood for Change and West Hill Community Services.

Greystone Park
845 Danforth Road
Located along Danforth Road and Greystone Walk Drive, Greystone Park is a one-hectare shaded green space that features a playground, splash pad, and outdoor basketball court, with paved paths allowing easy access.

Toronto Hydro House
676 Midland Avenue
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. Right at the intersection of Danforth Road and Midland Avenue rests a small, red brick bungalow. While it looks similar to the other homes of the area, this house has never been inhabited. 676 Midland Avenue is one of Toronto Hydro homes. Since the 1930s, false homes such as this were built around residential transformers. The main part of the building houses breakers and voltage dials, while the rear is home to the heavy equipment that converts high voltage electricity to a current suitable for domestic use. Otherwise, the inside of the house is completely bare except for a washroom and a working space for engineers. There are currently 79 of these hydro homes remaining in the city. Many of them were constructed to match the architectural styles of the neighbourhood. In this case, the shell home matches the bungalow style homes that populate Midland Avenue.

Vivian House
48 Laurel Avenue
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. Located just off Danforth Road, Vivian House was constructed in 1901, and is one of the oldest remaining houses built when Scarborough was known as a railway hub. Commonly known as Scarborough Junction, the south end of the neighbourhood from Lawrence Avenue to Kingston Road saw the intersection of two major railways, the Grand Trunk and Toronto Nippissing. Scarborough Junction became one of the most heavily populated villages in Scarborough. Vivian House is named for the Vivian family, a well-known family of cattle owners who lived in the home for four decades. The house was saved from demolition in 2015, and is now a designated heritage property. Vivian House remains as an example of Ontario House architecture, a distinctive style that emerged in the nineteenth century, and as a remnant of Scarborough's growth as a railway hub.

Women's Art Project Collective Artbox
725 Danforth Road
The key elements of the design, a young woman and a bus, represent students and their school life. A yellow bus is part of many children's daily routines. Some have fun, others day dream all while travelling to school and the many experiences that will likely shape their life.

Pine Hills Cemetery
625 Birchmount Road
Pine Hills Cemetery has been a resting place for members of the Scarborough community since 1928. The lush grounds provide a peaceful green space to stroll through. Taylor Massey Creek passes through the property, allowing visitors an opportunity to view local plants and wildlife. A few notable community members are buried in the cemetery, including local NHL hockey players John McLellen and Roy 'Shrimp' Worters.

Maywood Tot Lot
33 Maywood Park
Located along Maywood Park, Maywood Tot Lot is a small, open greenspace that features a playground, sports field, and gazebo.

Corvette Park
40 Corvette Avenue
Nestled between Kennedy Road and Midland Avenue, Corvette Park is a 2.4-hectare park that rests beside Corvette Junior Public School. The park features an open space with a children's playground, splash pad, and ball diamond. Like the public school, Corvette Park is named after the Corvette ships that made a significant contribution to the Canadian Navy in the Second World War.

Explore Kennedy Park

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Kate Nankervis
Oakridge Park
3459 Danforth Ave, Scarborough, ON M1L 1C9

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected]ronto.ca.

Neighbourhood Stroll

This stroll explores the many parks and heritage buildings throughout Kennedy Park, while highlighting local works of public art. Experience Scarborough's days as a railway hub while viewing the older buildings around Danforth Road, and see how the modern Kennedy Subway Station has become a work of public art. This walk will give you the opportunity to view collaborative artworks created by local youth, such as the 'Reflections' mural, and take you through peaceful green spaces including Corvette Park and the Pine Hills Cemetery. Fantastic local businesses await along Eglinton Avenue East, St. Clair Avenue East, Danforth Road, and Kennedy Road.

Main Streets: Eglinton Avenue East, St. Clair Avenue East, Kennedy Road and Danforth Road
  1. Frank Perna 'A Sense of Place' Mural
    2455 Eglinton Avenue East
    Designed by Frank Perna, 'A Sense of Place' was painted in 1997 to decorate the entrance of the Kennedy Subway Station. This mural was commissioned with the intention of making Kennedy Station a space that would increase the comfort level of pedestrians and commuters. The mural is spread out over six surfaces, and explores the idea of a sense of place for community in the natural world, highlighting the technology and multiculturalism of Toronto.
  2. Don Montgomery Community Recreation Centre and Grounds
    2467 Eglinton Avenue East
    Don Montgomery Community Recreation Centre and Grounds is located along Eglinton Avenue East, with easy access to the Kennedy Subway and GO Stations. The centre features a variety of facilities for recreational activities, cultural programming, and resources for youth, children, and seniors. It is also home to Da Block, one of the city's dedicated enhanced youth spaces, providing a supervised space for youth featuring Wi-Fi, games, recording studios, study labs, and free programs. The centre houses two indoor skating rinks, and is named for the late Don Montgomery, a local hockey player who was president of the Scarborough Hockey Association.
  3. Andra Striowski 'Reflections' Mural
    520 Brimley Road
    Developed by Andra Striowski and painted by youth artists Jaime Bruno, Chanel Cummins, Alanna Hargan, Tessa Sunnasy, and Jaime Vieria, 'Reflections' brightly adorns a brick wall overlooking a parking lot at the intersection of Brimley Road and Eglinton Avenue East. The mural depicts people viewing images in an art gallery, representing the idea that the media has replaced the arts as a major influence in both society and in how individuals perceive themselves. The theme for this mural was chosen by the youth artists, and represents how advertising and media affect the youth of today. Each artist designed and painted an individual piece of the mural as their own commentary on issues such as body image, materialism, and self-reflection. This project was done in partnership with Action for Neighbourhood for Change and West Hill Community Services.
  4. Greystone Park
    845 Danforth Road
    Located along Danforth Road and Greystone Walk Drive, Greystone Park is a one-hectare shaded green space that features a playground, splash pad, and outdoor basketball court, with paved paths allowing easy access.
  5. Toronto Hydro House
    676 Midland Avenue
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. Right at the intersection of Danforth Road and Midland Avenue rests a small, red brick bungalow. While it looks similar to the other homes of the area, this house has never been inhabited. 676 Midland Avenue is one of Toronto Hydro homes. Since the 1930s, false homes such as this were built around residential transformers. The main part of the building houses breakers and voltage dials, while the rear is home to the heavy equipment that converts high voltage electricity to a current suitable for domestic use. Otherwise, the inside of the house is completely bare except for a washroom and a working space for engineers. There are currently 79 of these hydro homes remaining in the city. Many of them were constructed to match the architectural styles of the neighbourhood. In this case, the shell home matches the bungalow style homes that populate Midland Avenue.
  6. Vivian House
    48 Laurel Avenue
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. Located just off Danforth Road, Vivian House was constructed in 1901, and is one of the oldest remaining houses built when Scarborough was known as a railway hub. Commonly known as Scarborough Junction, the south end of the neighbourhood from Lawrence Avenue to Kingston Road saw the intersection of two major railways, the Grand Trunk and Toronto Nippissing. Scarborough Junction became one of the most heavily populated villages in Scarborough. Vivian House is named for the Vivian family, a well-known family of cattle owners who lived in the home for four decades. The house was saved from demolition in 2015, and is now a designated heritage property. Vivian House remains as an example of Ontario House architecture, a distinctive style that emerged in the nineteenth century, and as a remnant of Scarborough's growth as a railway hub.
  7. Women's Art Project Collective Artbox
    725 Danforth Road
    The key elements of the design, a young woman and a bus, represent students and their school life. A yellow bus is part of many children's daily routines. Some have fun, others day dream all while travelling to school and the many experiences that will likely shape their life.
  8. Pine Hills Cemetery
    625 Birchmount Road
    Pine Hills Cemetery has been a resting place for members of the Scarborough community since 1928. The lush grounds provide a peaceful green space to stroll through. Taylor Massey Creek passes through the property, allowing visitors an opportunity to view local plants and wildlife. A few notable community members are buried in the cemetery, including local NHL hockey players John McLellen and Roy 'Shrimp' Worters.
  9. Maywood Tot Lot
    33 Maywood Park
    Located along Maywood Park, Maywood Tot Lot is a small, open greenspace that features a playground, sports field, and gazebo.
  10. Corvette Park
    40 Corvette Avenue
    Nestled between Kennedy Road and Midland Avenue, Corvette Park is a 2.4-hectare park that rests beside Corvette Junior Public School. The park features an open space with a children's playground, splash pad, and ball diamond. Like the public school, Corvette Park is named after the Corvette ships that made a significant contribution to the Canadian Navy in the Second World War.

Accessibility information: This walk takes place on streets and paved paths. All points of interest are viewable from the sidewalk. The paths through Greystone Park and Pine Hills Cemetery may be difficult to maneuver depending on weather conditions. There may be uneven ground through Maywood Tot Lot and Corvette Park, which may be difficult to navigate depending on weather conditions.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.