Lansing-Westgate

Mabuhay Garden at Bathurst-Wilson Parkette
3749 Bathurst Street
The Mabuhay Garden is a garden within the Bathurst-Wilson Parkette. Mabuhay means 'welcome' in Tagalog and this gathering space was opened in 2016 in recognition of the area's strong Filipino community. It includes seating and landscaping, a pergola and flower plantings. The parkette is also home to Ian Leventhal's monumental mural, which was funded as part of the City of Toronto's Clean and Beautiful City Initiative in 2005 and 2006. This significant neighbourhood feature is based on George Seurat's 'A Day in the Park' and has sustained many years of enjoyment by the local community and those transiting through the area.

Canadian Society for Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial
4169 Bathurst Street
Note: Please be respectful as this site is a memorial. Created in 1991 by Ernest Raab, the Holocaust Memorial is surrounded by eight marble walls called the 'Wall of Remembrance'. On the wall are thousands of names of Holocaust victims and survivors who rebuilt their lives in Canada but have since passed away. The site also includes a statue of Raoul Wallenberg, who is credited for saving the lives of more than 10,000 Hungarian Jews.

Dr. Jose P. Rizal Statue
4169 Bathurst Street
The statue of Dr. Jose P. Rizal by F.B. Caede was given by the Philippine government to the City of Toronto in 1998 on the centennial of Filipino independence. Rizal was a doctor, philosopher and a poet, and his writings influenced the nationalist movement that led to independence of the Philippines from Spain. He is known as the father of Filipino independence. Dr. Jose P. Rizal is also said to have been the first Filipino to set foot in Canada in 1888.

Earl Bales Park
4169 Bathurst Street
Earl Bales Park is named after Robert Earl Bales, a former Reeve (Mayor) of the Township of North York. This park is situated on lands once owned and farmed by his great-grandfather John Bales. In the early 1900s, after a century as a farm, the land was turned into the York Downs Golf and Country Club. You can still see a few of the old tees and greens as you wander through the park today. Earl Bales Park is now spread across 127 acres (51 hectares) and features playgrounds, a sensory garden, splash pad, outdoor amphitheatre, memorials, paved walking/cycling trails, picnic sites and fire pits. The off-leash dogs area is fenced and allows commercial dog walkers. The park has one of the two ski and snowboard centres run by the City of Toronto. Recent upgrades to the ski chalet and an addition of a quad chair lift have made for a more enjoyable skiing and snowboarding experience on the hills. The Earl Bales Community Centre also offers a wide variety of programs for all ages.

John Bales House
4169 Bathurst Street
*Note: Private property. Please observe from the sidewalk in the park. This distinctive one-and-a-half-storey building is among the oldest buildings in Toronto still standing in its original location. John and Elizabeth Bales emigrated from England and bought 60 acres at the corner of Bathurst Street and Wilson Avenue where they built this home around 1824. The property became part of the York Downs Golf and Country Club by 1922, and the house became the home for the groundskeepers. In 1975, the area surrounding the home was incorporated into Earl Bales Park, which is named for the great-grandson of the original home builders.

Gwendolen Park
3 Gwendolen Crescent
Gwendolen Park overlooks the West Don River and features four lit tennis courts, a baseball diamond and children's playground.

Albert Standing Park
50 Bogert Avenue
This park on Sheppard Avenue West near Yonge Street features a decorative water fountain, arbour and sitting area.

Lansing & Dempsey Brothers Hardware
4814 Yonge Street
While the corner of Yonge Street and Sheppard Avenue looks completely modern now, it was once a fairly rural community centre. The Joseph Shepard House built here in 1860 was first constructed as a general store and residence for the Shepard family. The addition of a post office in 1886, and the postal designation of 'Lansing' gave the area its local name. The store served as a coach depot, milk depot and repository for manufactured goods. The store came into the possession of the Dempsey Brothers in 1923 and their hardware store was owned and operated by the family until the 1980s. In 1996 the entire building was moved north to Beecroft Road, where it still sits today.

Joseph Shepard Building
4900 Yonge Street
The Joseph Shepard Building was built as a result of an increase in federal expenditure on public services in the 1970s, and helped to further develop the urban core of the former City of North York. Completed in 1977, architect Macy Dubois focused the design on energy efficiency, visitor approachability, quality workspace, and flexibility in the floorplan. The 14-storey office complex features a five-storey atrium, open air terraces, and a courtyard. The building won an award of excellence for its energy efficiency in 1979 and remains a hub for government offices.

The Shepard Family
4902 Yonge Street (10 Upper Madison)
The Shepard family was responsible for the development of much of the area around Yonge Street and Sheppard Avenue. Joseph Shepard built his first home on Yonge Street in 1798, and the second one in 1835, which still stands today just east of here at 90 Burndale Avenue. The family built, owned and operated several saw mills, taverns, a hotel, and the general store south of here. They were involved in the Rebellion of 1837, with several Shepards living in exile until they were pardoned for their actions. Sheppard Avenue is named for this enterprising family.

Meridian Arts Centre
5040 Yonge Street
When it first opened in 1993 with a Broadway bound production of 'Show Boat', the Main Stage Theatre had 1,727 seats in the North York Performing Arts Centre. Famous for the runs of 'Sunset Boulevard' and 'Jersey Boys', the theatre has undergone several changes in the last few years. The Meridian Arts Centre currently houses four theatres: The George Weston Recital Hall, the Studio Theatre, Greenwin Theatre, and Lyric Theatre. The building was designed by German-Canadian architect Eberhard Zeidler. Zeidler is a member of both the Order of Canada and Order of Ontario.

North York Arts & Peter Hide 'The Green Between'
5040 Yonge Street
Located within the Meridian Arts Centre is North York Arts (NYA), an arts service organization that believes in creative expression and inclusive arts programming to enliven neighbourhoods and bring people together. NYA provides arts events and programs to children, youth, family and seniors including programs to serve new Canadians and communities within North York. Outside the doors of the NYA sits 'The Green Between', a large abstract sculpture by Peter Hide. The left side of the sculpture consists of a gently curved plate and the right side is made up of smaller pieces of steel to represent contrast of textures.

Michael Shepard House
160 Beecroft Road
This brick farmhouse was built by Michael Shepard, son of Joseph Shepard. Michael purchased part of the property from his father just months before the Rebellion of 1837 broke out. The rebel leader, William Lyon Mackenzie, hid on this property before escaping to the United States to avoid imprisonment. Both Michael and his brother Thomas participated in the Rebellion as well and were imprisoned. The brothers escaped and fled to the United States, returning to Canada when they were pardoned in 1843. In 1859, Michael built this house and lived here until 1876. In 1916, the Toronto General Burying grounds (now Mount Pleasant Cemetery) bought the house and the property. The land was converted for cemetery use, however, it was not used as a cemetery until 1946. The Michael Shepard House now serves as part of the offices for York Cemetery.

Explore Lansing-Westgate

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Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Mark Reinhart
Toronto Public Library: Downsview Branch
2793 Keele St, North York, ON M3M 2G3

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This busy residential neighbourhood is centered around the Don River West Branch. Stroll through the beautiful expanse of Earl Bales Park, see historic buildings and the performing arts hub at the Meridian Arts Centre. You'll find plenty of local businesses along Yonge Street within the Willowdale BIA, and an amazing range of tasty takeout options.

Main Streets: Yonge Street
  1. Mabuhay Garden at Bathurst-Wilson Parkette
    3749 Bathurst Street
    The Mabuhay Garden is a garden within the Bathurst-Wilson Parkette. Mabuhay means 'welcome' in Tagalog and this gathering space was opened in 2016 in recognition of the area's strong Filipino community. It includes seating and landscaping, a pergola and flower plantings. The parkette is also home to Ian Leventhal's monumental mural, which was funded as part of the City of Toronto's Clean and Beautiful City Initiative in 2005 and 2006. This significant neighbourhood feature is based on George Seurat's 'A Day in the Park' and has sustained many years of enjoyment by the local community and those transiting through the area.
  2. Canadian Society for Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial
    4169 Bathurst Street
    Note: Please be respectful as this site is a memorial. Created in 1991 by Ernest Raab, the Holocaust Memorial is surrounded by eight marble walls called the 'Wall of Remembrance'. On the wall are thousands of names of Holocaust victims and survivors who rebuilt their lives in Canada but have since passed away. The site also includes a statue of Raoul Wallenberg, who is credited for saving the lives of more than 10,000 Hungarian Jews.
  3. Dr. Jose P. Rizal Statue
    4169 Bathurst Street
    The statue of Dr. Jose P. Rizal by F.B. Caede was given by the Philippine government to the City of Toronto in 1998 on the centennial of Filipino independence. Rizal was a doctor, philosopher and a poet, and his writings influenced the nationalist movement that led to independence of the Philippines from Spain. He is known as the father of Filipino independence. Dr. Jose P. Rizal is also said to have been the first Filipino to set foot in Canada in 1888.
  4. Earl Bales Park
    4169 Bathurst Street
    Earl Bales Park is named after Robert Earl Bales, a former Reeve (Mayor) of the Township of North York. This park is situated on lands once owned and farmed by his great-grandfather John Bales. In the early 1900s, after a century as a farm, the land was turned into the York Downs Golf and Country Club. You can still see a few of the old tees and greens as you wander through the park today. Earl Bales Park is now spread across 127 acres (51 hectares) and features playgrounds, a sensory garden, splash pad, outdoor amphitheatre, memorials, paved walking/cycling trails, picnic sites and fire pits. The off-leash dogs area is fenced and allows commercial dog walkers. The park has one of the two ski and snowboard centres run by the City of Toronto. Recent upgrades to the ski chalet and an addition of a quad chair lift have made for a more enjoyable skiing and snowboarding experience on the hills. The Earl Bales Community Centre also offers a wide variety of programs for all ages.
  5. John Bales House
    4169 Bathurst Street
    *Note: Private property. Please observe from the sidewalk in the park. This distinctive one-and-a-half-storey building is among the oldest buildings in Toronto still standing in its original location. John and Elizabeth Bales emigrated from England and bought 60 acres at the corner of Bathurst Street and Wilson Avenue where they built this home around 1824. The property became part of the York Downs Golf and Country Club by 1922, and the house became the home for the groundskeepers. In 1975, the area surrounding the home was incorporated into Earl Bales Park, which is named for the great-grandson of the original home builders.
  6. Gwendolen Park
    3 Gwendolen Crescent
    Gwendolen Park overlooks the West Don River and features four lit tennis courts, a baseball diamond and children's playground.
  7. Albert Standing Park
    50 Bogert Avenue
    This park on Sheppard Avenue West near Yonge Street features a decorative water fountain, arbour and sitting area.
  8. Lansing & Dempsey Brothers Hardware
    4814 Yonge Street
    While the corner of Yonge Street and Sheppard Avenue looks completely modern now, it was once a fairly rural community centre. The Joseph Shepard House built here in 1860 was first constructed as a general store and residence for the Shepard family. The addition of a post office in 1886, and the postal designation of 'Lansing' gave the area its local name. The store served as a coach depot, milk depot and repository for manufactured goods. The store came into the possession of the Dempsey Brothers in 1923 and their hardware store was owned and operated by the family until the 1980s. In 1996 the entire building was moved north to Beecroft Road, where it still sits today.
  9. Joseph Shepard Building
    4900 Yonge Street
    The Joseph Shepard Building was built as a result of an increase in federal expenditure on public services in the 1970s, and helped to further develop the urban core of the former City of North York. Completed in 1977, architect Macy Dubois focused the design on energy efficiency, visitor approachability, quality workspace, and flexibility in the floorplan. The 14-storey office complex features a five-storey atrium, open air terraces, and a courtyard. The building won an award of excellence for its energy efficiency in 1979 and remains a hub for government offices.
  10. The Shepard Family
    4902 Yonge Street (10 Upper Madison)
    The Shepard family was responsible for the development of much of the area around Yonge Street and Sheppard Avenue. Joseph Shepard built his first home on Yonge Street in 1798, and the second one in 1835, which still stands today just east of here at 90 Burndale Avenue. The family built, owned and operated several saw mills, taverns, a hotel, and the general store south of here. They were involved in the Rebellion of 1837, with several Shepards living in exile until they were pardoned for their actions. Sheppard Avenue is named for this enterprising family.
  11. Meridian Arts Centre
    5040 Yonge Street
    When it first opened in 1993 with a Broadway bound production of 'Show Boat', the Main Stage Theatre had 1,727 seats in the North York Performing Arts Centre. Famous for the runs of 'Sunset Boulevard' and 'Jersey Boys', the theatre has undergone several changes in the last few years. The Meridian Arts Centre currently houses four theatres: The George Weston Recital Hall, the Studio Theatre, Greenwin Theatre, and Lyric Theatre. The building was designed by German-Canadian architect Eberhard Zeidler. Zeidler is a member of both the Order of Canada and Order of Ontario.
  12. North York Arts & Peter Hide 'The Green Between'
    5040 Yonge Street
    Located within the Meridian Arts Centre is North York Arts (NYA), an arts service organization that believes in creative expression and inclusive arts programming to enliven neighbourhoods and bring people together. NYA provides arts events and programs to children, youth, family and seniors including programs to serve new Canadians and communities within North York. Outside the doors of the NYA sits 'The Green Between', a large abstract sculpture by Peter Hide. The left side of the sculpture consists of a gently curved plate and the right side is made up of smaller pieces of steel to represent contrast of textures.
  13. Michael Shepard House
    160 Beecroft Road
    This brick farmhouse was built by Michael Shepard, son of Joseph Shepard. Michael purchased part of the property from his father just months before the Rebellion of 1837 broke out. The rebel leader, William Lyon Mackenzie, hid on this property before escaping to the United States to avoid imprisonment. Both Michael and his brother Thomas participated in the Rebellion as well and were imprisoned. The brothers escaped and fled to the United States, returning to Canada when they were pardoned in 1843. In 1859, Michael built this house and lived here until 1876. In 1916, the Toronto General Burying grounds (now Mount Pleasant Cemetery) bought the house and the property. The land was converted for cemetery use, however, it was not used as a cemetery until 1946. The Michael Shepard House now serves as part of the offices for York Cemetery.

Accessibility information: All points of interest are visible from the sidewalk. Please note that Sheppard Avenue has a steep incline. While the paths in Earl Bales Park are paved, use caution as parts of the park are uneven.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.