Lawrence Park North

George Milbrandt Parkette and Heritage Plaque
3101 Yonge Street
At the northeast corner of Yonge Street and Lawrence Avenue East, George Milbrandt Parkette is a symbol of community in Lawrence Park North. The site is named after local resident George Milbrandt, who for 25 years advocated for the parkette's creation as a neighbourhood hub. The parkette was designated in 1998 for citizens' enjoyment, and still remains today as a welcoming green space and entry point to the neighbourhood. Milbrandt immigrated to Canada from the United States to join the Faculty of Education at the University of Toronto. A longtime resident of North Toronto, he also contributed to the Lawrence Park community as Director and President of the Bedford Park Residents' Association from 1971 to 1986, and through his involvement in the City of Toronto Assessment Reform Working Group from the 1980s to 90s. He was also a member of the Bedford Park School Community Coalition from 1998.

Toronto Fire Station 131
3135 Yonge Street
Note: This is an active fire station. Please do not block the driveway. Toronto Fire Station 131 is one of the City of Toronto's historic fire stations. Built in 1931 in the Tudor style, it is an eye-catching two-storey structure. Fire Station 131 is a sister station to Fire Station 424 on Runnymede Road in West Toronto. Although Runnymede's Station 424 was built in 1927, a few years earlier than this one, the two have the same floorplan. However, this station (Station 131) was unique from its sister station as it had an integral heating system put in at the time of its construction. Fire Station 131 was retrofitted in 2003 to accommodate a taller ladder truck, and the original wood millwork was replaced due to building code regulations. Nevertheless, the station still stands, and it remains a significant example of Tudor style architecture in the city.

Bedford Park Community Centre
81 Ranleigh Avenue
Adjacent to Bedford Park Public School, Bedford Park Community Centre is a welcoming recreational space for all members of the community. The centre has an indoor pool and gymnasium. It also offers programs for preschoolers, seniors, and summer camps, as well as fitness and swimming programs for all ages.

Bedford Park Public School
81 Ranleigh Avenue
Designed by architect Charles H. Bishop and completed in 1911, Bedford Park Public School is a hidden architectural gem in Lawrence Park North. Situated next to Bedford Park Community Centre, the school makes up part of a community hub within the neighbourhood. The building's Classical Revival style cuts an impressive figure in the quiet residential area, with the Roman columns flanking the front doors. The school underwent a major addition in 1959, with other additions and renovations occurring over the twentieth century. The large schoolyard is partially enclosed but showcases the classical facade of the building.

Wanless Park
392 Broadway Avenue
In the southeast part of Lawrence Park North, Wanless Park serves as a charming meeting place within the residential neighbourhood. The park features a wading pool, numerous baseball/softball diamonds, and a large playground. In the winter, a natural hockey/ice rink can usually be found at the park. There is also a multipurpose field, picnic areas, and an outdoor basketball court. The park is named after prominent Toronto businessman John Wanless, a successful jeweller. Wanless served as a council member for the Township of York between 1903 and 1905, and was an alderman for the City from 1912 to 1914. He also drove reform within the school system as a member of the Board of Education from 1921 to 1922, having fought for teachers' salary increases.

Former Charlesworth Estate, Home of Hector Willoughby Charlesworth
17 Teddington Park Avenue (South side of street between Yonge Street and Bocastle Avenue)
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. With its mansard roof and imposing facade, this house is among the oldest in the neighbourhood. Built in the 1870s, it was the childhood home of Hector Willoughby Charlesworth, who lived here until he married Katherine Ryan in 1897. A journalist and arts commentator, Charlesworth worked as an assistant editor for 'Saturday Night', Canada's oldest general interest magazine. He then wrote for the 'Toronto World' and later the 'Toronto Empire', and he is known as the Group of Seven's harshest critic. In 1932, Prime Minister R.B. Bennett invited him to chair the newly established Canadian Radio Broadcasting Commission (now CBC). Charlesworth's house was originally located on Yonge Street facing west, but was moved in 1928 and turned 90 degrees to sit on the newly created Teddington Park Avenue, to make room for a bank. Charlesworth died in 1945, having made a significant impact upon the arts in Toronto.

Yonge Boulevard Parkette
3446 Yonge Street
Sandwiched amidst shops and residences at the north end of the Yonge Lawrence Village BIA, the Yonge Boulevard Parkette is a perfect resting spot during your stroll. A shaded green space with benches and gardens, the parkette sits in a central vantage point to admire the varied features of the neighbourhood and its main street, Yonge Street.

Emilia Jajus 'Four Seasons' Artbox
Yonge Street and Fairlawn Avenue
Part of the City of Toronto's Outside the Box program, artist Emilia Jajus' work can be found at the corner of Yonge Street and Fairlawn Avenue. Titled 'Four Seasons' this artbox is painted with respect to the changing of the seasons, with one season depicted on each side of the electrical box. Emilia Jajus immigrated to Canada from Poland in 1998. She has studied at the Toronto School of Art and Virtual Art Academy

Former General Store & Post Office of Lawrence Park North
3162 Yonge Street (Yonge Street and Bedford Park Avenue)
This building at 3162 Yonge Street was once the general store and post office within Lawrence Park North. Now home to local businesses, it is the oldest commercial building in the neighbourhood. Built in 1892, the structure remains intact today, with architectural features indicative of the late Victorian time period. Having a post office was a status symbol for neighbourhoods in late nineteenth century Toronto, and local jeweller and businessman Philip Ellis was determined to build one in the area. Known as the first developer of the Lawrence Park neighbourhood, Ellis planned to build out the community with 1500 bungalows. Within three years of its opening, the post office expanded its offerings to include a general store. Solidly built from brick with intricate brickwork over the arched windows, the building has overseen business in Lawrence Park North for over a century.

Woburn Avenue Playground
75 Woburn Avenue
The Woburn Avenue Playground is an ideal space for families and young children. Located near Lawrence subway station, the playground boasts a sandbox, wading pool, fieldhouse, climbing structures, and swings.

Explore Lawrence Park North

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

We want to hear from you! Click here to complete a short survey

Suppport small business owners by Shopping Small.

Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Mark Reinhart
Toronto Public Library – Forest Hill Branch
700 Eglinton Ave W, Toronto, ON M5N 1B9

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

North of Yonge Street and Lawrence Avenue, and just east of Avenue Road, Lawrence Park North is a tranquil residential hamlet with a strong community history. Shaped by passionate community members, the neighbourhood features numerous green spaces, each with their own unique features. A vibrant variety of shops can be found along Yonge Street, along with hidden architectural gems harkening back to the history of this small but spirited community. Great local businesses can be found in the Yonge Lawrence Village BIA.

Main Streets: Yonge Street
  1. George Milbrandt Parkette and Heritage Plaque
    3101 Yonge Street
    At the northeast corner of Yonge Street and Lawrence Avenue East, George Milbrandt Parkette is a symbol of community in Lawrence Park North. The site is named after local resident George Milbrandt, who for 25 years advocated for the parkette's creation as a neighbourhood hub. The parkette was designated in 1998 for citizens' enjoyment, and still remains today as a welcoming green space and entry point to the neighbourhood. Milbrandt immigrated to Canada from the United States to join the Faculty of Education at the University of Toronto. A longtime resident of North Toronto, he also contributed to the Lawrence Park community as Director and President of the Bedford Park Residents' Association from 1971 to 1986, and through his involvement in the City of Toronto Assessment Reform Working Group from the 1980s to 90s. He was also a member of the Bedford Park School Community Coalition from 1998.
  2. Toronto Fire Station 131
    3135 Yonge Street
    Note: This is an active fire station. Please do not block the driveway. Toronto Fire Station 131 is one of the City of Toronto's historic fire stations. Built in 1931 in the Tudor style, it is an eye-catching two-storey structure. Fire Station 131 is a sister station to Fire Station 424 on Runnymede Road in West Toronto. Although Runnymede's Station 424 was built in 1927, a few years earlier than this one, the two have the same floorplan. However, this station (Station 131) was unique from its sister station as it had an integral heating system put in at the time of its construction. Fire Station 131 was retrofitted in 2003 to accommodate a taller ladder truck, and the original wood millwork was replaced due to building code regulations. Nevertheless, the station still stands, and it remains a significant example of Tudor style architecture in the city.
  3. Bedford Park Community Centre
    81 Ranleigh Avenue
    Adjacent to Bedford Park Public School, Bedford Park Community Centre is a welcoming recreational space for all members of the community. The centre has an indoor pool and gymnasium. It also offers programs for preschoolers, seniors, and summer camps, as well as fitness and swimming programs for all ages.
  4. Bedford Park Public School
    81 Ranleigh Avenue
    Designed by architect Charles H. Bishop and completed in 1911, Bedford Park Public School is a hidden architectural gem in Lawrence Park North. Situated next to Bedford Park Community Centre, the school makes up part of a community hub within the neighbourhood. The building's Classical Revival style cuts an impressive figure in the quiet residential area, with the Roman columns flanking the front doors. The school underwent a major addition in 1959, with other additions and renovations occurring over the twentieth century. The large schoolyard is partially enclosed but showcases the classical facade of the building.
  5. Wanless Park
    392 Broadway Avenue
    In the southeast part of Lawrence Park North, Wanless Park serves as a charming meeting place within the residential neighbourhood. The park features a wading pool, numerous baseball/softball diamonds, and a large playground. In the winter, a natural hockey/ice rink can usually be found at the park. There is also a multipurpose field, picnic areas, and an outdoor basketball court. The park is named after prominent Toronto businessman John Wanless, a successful jeweller. Wanless served as a council member for the Township of York between 1903 and 1905, and was an alderman for the City from 1912 to 1914. He also drove reform within the school system as a member of the Board of Education from 1921 to 1922, having fought for teachers' salary increases.
  6. Former Charlesworth Estate, Home of Hector Willoughby Charlesworth
    17 Teddington Park Avenue (South side of street between Yonge Street and Bocastle Avenue)
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. With its mansard roof and imposing facade, this house is among the oldest in the neighbourhood. Built in the 1870s, it was the childhood home of Hector Willoughby Charlesworth, who lived here until he married Katherine Ryan in 1897. A journalist and arts commentator, Charlesworth worked as an assistant editor for 'Saturday Night', Canada's oldest general interest magazine. He then wrote for the 'Toronto World' and later the 'Toronto Empire', and he is known as the Group of Seven's harshest critic. In 1932, Prime Minister R.B. Bennett invited him to chair the newly established Canadian Radio Broadcasting Commission (now CBC). Charlesworth's house was originally located on Yonge Street facing west, but was moved in 1928 and turned 90 degrees to sit on the newly created Teddington Park Avenue, to make room for a bank. Charlesworth died in 1945, having made a significant impact upon the arts in Toronto.
  7. Yonge Boulevard Parkette
    3446 Yonge Street
    Sandwiched amidst shops and residences at the north end of the Yonge Lawrence Village BIA, the Yonge Boulevard Parkette is a perfect resting spot during your stroll. A shaded green space with benches and gardens, the parkette sits in a central vantage point to admire the varied features of the neighbourhood and its main street, Yonge Street.
  8. Emilia Jajus 'Four Seasons' Artbox
    Yonge Street and Fairlawn Avenue
    Part of the City of Toronto's Outside the Box program, artist Emilia Jajus' work can be found at the corner of Yonge Street and Fairlawn Avenue. Titled 'Four Seasons' this artbox is painted with respect to the changing of the seasons, with one season depicted on each side of the electrical box. Emilia Jajus immigrated to Canada from Poland in 1998. She has studied at the Toronto School of Art and Virtual Art Academy
  9. Former General Store & Post Office of Lawrence Park North
    3162 Yonge Street (Yonge Street and Bedford Park Avenue)
    This building at 3162 Yonge Street was once the general store and post office within Lawrence Park North. Now home to local businesses, it is the oldest commercial building in the neighbourhood. Built in 1892, the structure remains intact today, with architectural features indicative of the late Victorian time period. Having a post office was a status symbol for neighbourhoods in late nineteenth century Toronto, and local jeweller and businessman Philip Ellis was determined to build one in the area. Known as the first developer of the Lawrence Park neighbourhood, Ellis planned to build out the community with 1500 bungalows. Within three years of its opening, the post office expanded its offerings to include a general store. Solidly built from brick with intricate brickwork over the arched windows, the building has overseen business in Lawrence Park North for over a century.
  10. Woburn Avenue Playground
    75 Woburn Avenue
    The Woburn Avenue Playground is an ideal space for families and young children. Located near Lawrence subway station, the playground boasts a sandbox, wading pool, fieldhouse, climbing structures, and swings.

Accessibility information: All points of interest are viewable from the street. The main pathways on Yonge Street and along residential streets are fairly flat. Most green spaces are accessible, but take caution where steep inclines are indicated. There are some unpaved paths in Wanless Park.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.