Long Branch

Yasaman Mehrsa Artbox
3840 Lake Shore Boulevard West
Designed by Yasaman Mehrsa, this artbox depicts a red tailed hawk flying over water, accompanied by smaller birds. Born and raised in Tehran, Iran, Mehrsa developed her artistic skills studying at both Tehran University and Brock University. Her focus is on painting murals that explore the relationship between humans and nature, and to encourage people to actively think about the world around them.

Toronto Public Library - Long Branch
3500 Lake Shore Boulevard West
Long Branch Library was first founded as an Association Public Library in 1923, long before it opened in this location. In 1943, the Long Branch Association Public Library began fundraising for a new library building, and set aside property for a space on Lake Shore in 1947. This library first opened to the public in 1955. The relief carving of a reader over the entrance of the library remains a notable feature of this location. The carving is unattributed, though it may have been the work of Toronto artist E.B. Cox. Today, the library features an art exhibit space, a large Polish collection, and the Long Branch Historical Society Local History Collection.

Barb Symmons 'Bring the Lake up to Lakeshore' Mural
3481 Lake Shore Boulevard West
Designed by local artist Barb Symmons in 1999, this mural depicts a scene by the lakeshore. Symmons represents water as the most important source of livelihood on earth, and as a focal point of the Long Branch community. The mural was commissioned by the Long Branch BIA with support from Lakeshore Arts. It can be viewed on the corner of Lake Shore and Thirty Second Street.

Laburnham Park
60 Laburnham Avenue
Located between Laburnham Avenue and Twenty Sixth Street, Laburnham Park is a 1.9-hectare green space that features two outdoor tennis courts and a children's playground.

Richard and Lucy Newborn House
28 Daisy Avenue
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. Built between 1847 and 1852, this house belonged to Richard and Lucy Newborn. It remains the oldest building in the Long Branch neighbourhood and a link to the agricultural roots of the early township. It is great example of a Gothic Revival Cottage, constructed with local fieldstone and stucco walls. While many people have lived in the home since its construction, the front door and some of the windows are original to when it was first built. It is listed in the City of Toronto's Inventory of Heritage Properties.

Vincent Massey Academy
68 Daisy Avenue
Now home to the Vincent Massey Academy, this building was first constructed as the Daisy Avenue Public School in 1929. Later additions to the building were added in the 1950s and 1960s, and it is designated as a remaining example of a Collegiate Gothic Style building that displays the growth of the Long Branch community. The facade of the school may be familiar to fans of 'Degrassi: Junior High'. While the show was set in the east end of Toronto, the scenes at the school were filmed at Vincent Massey Public School, which closed in the 1980s. The school continues to be named for Vincent Massey, a former Governor General of Canada.

Birch Park
75 Arcadian Circle
Located on the west side of Arcadian Circle, Birch Park is a 2-hectare green space that features a playground, wading pool, baseball diamond, and two tennis courts. The Long Branch Arena shares a space with the park, which features an indoor skating rink and a variety of Learn to Skate programs. Birch Park offers an open space to stroll through and is a short walk away from the lakeshore.

Long Branch Cenotaph War Memorial
31 Park Boulevard
Located in a small parkette in front of 31 Park Boulevard stands the Long Branch Cenotaph War Memorial, commemorating Long Branch residents who lost their lives in the First World War. The cenotaph was constructed in 1933, with materials donated by local merchants and mounted by Royal Canadian Legion members and Long Branch residents.

Long Branch Park
245 Lake Promenade
Located right along the shoreline of Lake Ontario below Lake Promenade, Long Branch Park is a 1.4-hectare park that boasts an open view of Lake Ontario, making it a prime spot to watch the sunrise or sunset. The park features a playground, gazebo, and a paved path that takes you along the shoreline. The path also takes pedestrians by the houses lining Lake Promenade, showcasing the cottage style homes that populated Long Branch when it first became a cottage retreat for city dwellers in the late nineteenth century. Many of these homes are listed in the City of Toronto's Inventory of Heritage Properties.

Marie Curtis Park
2 Forty Second Street
Named for Long Branch Reeve (Mayor) Marie Curtis, this park was created in the late 1950s to help control flooding after Hurricane Hazel nearly swept many of the homes in Long Branch into Lake Ontario. Curtis was elected the first female reeve in Long Branch, and pushed for the development of this park, along with other flood prevention policies. Marie Curtis Park is one of the few beaches in North America named after a female community leader, and a plaque commemorating her contributions to Long Branch can be found in the park. The park features a playground and splash pad, bike trails, walking trails, and picnic sites. Scenic views make it a sought out place to watch for birds and other local wildlife. The beach may be familiar to people from its appearances in film and television, including its appearance in the Academy Award-winning film 'Room'.

Explore Long Branch

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Mark Reinhart
New Toronto Branch
110 Eleventh St, Etobicoke, ON M8V 3G5

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This stroll explores the beautiful lakeshore community of Long Branch, highlighting the many parks and works of public art throughout the neighbourhood. Experience how the neighbourhood has changed over time from an agricultural farming community to a resort destination for Torontonians in the 1800s through heritage buildings such as the Newborn House. Visit parks that line the lakeshore and explore the natural landscape of Marie Curtis Park, named for a prominent political and community leader. This tour takes you through the Long Branch BIA along Lake Shore Boulevard West, allowing you to visit local shops, restaurants, and a diverse range of businesses.

Main Streets: Lake Shore Boulevard West
  1. Yasaman Mehrsa Artbox
    3840 Lake Shore Boulevard West
    Designed by Yasaman Mehrsa, this artbox depicts a red tailed hawk flying over water, accompanied by smaller birds. Born and raised in Tehran, Iran, Mehrsa developed her artistic skills studying at both Tehran University and Brock University. Her focus is on painting murals that explore the relationship between humans and nature, and to encourage people to actively think about the world around them.
  2. Toronto Public Library - Long Branch
    3500 Lake Shore Boulevard West
    Long Branch Library was first founded as an Association Public Library in 1923, long before it opened in this location. In 1943, the Long Branch Association Public Library began fundraising for a new library building, and set aside property for a space on Lake Shore in 1947. This library first opened to the public in 1955. The relief carving of a reader over the entrance of the library remains a notable feature of this location. The carving is unattributed, though it may have been the work of Toronto artist E.B. Cox. Today, the library features an art exhibit space, a large Polish collection, and the Long Branch Historical Society Local History Collection.
  3. Barb Symmons 'Bring the Lake up to Lakeshore' Mural
    3481 Lake Shore Boulevard West
    Designed by local artist Barb Symmons in 1999, this mural depicts a scene by the lakeshore. Symmons represents water as the most important source of livelihood on earth, and as a focal point of the Long Branch community. The mural was commissioned by the Long Branch BIA with support from Lakeshore Arts. It can be viewed on the corner of Lake Shore and Thirty Second Street.
  4. Laburnham Park
    60 Laburnham Avenue
    Located between Laburnham Avenue and Twenty Sixth Street, Laburnham Park is a 1.9-hectare green space that features two outdoor tennis courts and a children's playground.
  5. Richard and Lucy Newborn House
    28 Daisy Avenue
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. Built between 1847 and 1852, this house belonged to Richard and Lucy Newborn. It remains the oldest building in the Long Branch neighbourhood and a link to the agricultural roots of the early township. It is great example of a Gothic Revival Cottage, constructed with local fieldstone and stucco walls. While many people have lived in the home since its construction, the front door and some of the windows are original to when it was first built. It is listed in the City of Toronto's Inventory of Heritage Properties.
  6. Vincent Massey Academy
    68 Daisy Avenue
    Now home to the Vincent Massey Academy, this building was first constructed as the Daisy Avenue Public School in 1929. Later additions to the building were added in the 1950s and 1960s, and it is designated as a remaining example of a Collegiate Gothic Style building that displays the growth of the Long Branch community. The facade of the school may be familiar to fans of 'Degrassi: Junior High'. While the show was set in the east end of Toronto, the scenes at the school were filmed at Vincent Massey Public School, which closed in the 1980s. The school continues to be named for Vincent Massey, a former Governor General of Canada.
  7. Birch Park
    75 Arcadian Circle
    Located on the west side of Arcadian Circle, Birch Park is a 2-hectare green space that features a playground, wading pool, baseball diamond, and two tennis courts. The Long Branch Arena shares a space with the park, which features an indoor skating rink and a variety of Learn to Skate programs. Birch Park offers an open space to stroll through and is a short walk away from the lakeshore.
  8. Long Branch Cenotaph War Memorial
    31 Park Boulevard
    Located in a small parkette in front of 31 Park Boulevard stands the Long Branch Cenotaph War Memorial, commemorating Long Branch residents who lost their lives in the First World War. The cenotaph was constructed in 1933, with materials donated by local merchants and mounted by Royal Canadian Legion members and Long Branch residents.
  9. Long Branch Park
    245 Lake Promenade
    Located right along the shoreline of Lake Ontario below Lake Promenade, Long Branch Park is a 1.4-hectare park that boasts an open view of Lake Ontario, making it a prime spot to watch the sunrise or sunset. The park features a playground, gazebo, and a paved path that takes you along the shoreline. The path also takes pedestrians by the houses lining Lake Promenade, showcasing the cottage style homes that populated Long Branch when it first became a cottage retreat for city dwellers in the late nineteenth century. Many of these homes are listed in the City of Toronto's Inventory of Heritage Properties.
  10. Marie Curtis Park
    2 Forty Second Street
    Named for Long Branch Reeve (Mayor) Marie Curtis, this park was created in the late 1950s to help control flooding after Hurricane Hazel nearly swept many of the homes in Long Branch into Lake Ontario. Curtis was elected the first female reeve in Long Branch, and pushed for the development of this park, along with other flood prevention policies. Marie Curtis Park is one of the few beaches in North America named after a female community leader, and a plaque commemorating her contributions to Long Branch can be found in the park. The park features a playground and splash pad, bike trails, walking trails, and picnic sites. Scenic views make it a sought out place to watch for birds and other local wildlife. The beach may be familiar to people from its appearances in film and television, including its appearance in the Academy Award-winning film 'Room'.

Accessibility information: This walk takes place on streets and paved paths. All stops are viewable from the sidewalk. There is a slight incline while walking to view the 'Bring the Lake up to Lakeshore' mural, which goes through an underpass. The paths through Laburnham Park, Birch Park, Long Branch Park, and Marie Curtis Park may be difficult to maneuver depending on weather conditions.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.