Markland Wood

Silverthorn Collegiate Institute
291 Mill Road
Silverthorn Collegiate Institute was constructed in the early 1960s to serve the growing Markland Wood subdivision. The subdivision was created in 1958 by developer Mark Cavotti, who purchased much of the surrounding land from descendants of the Silverthorn family. The community featured large, wooded lots, with streets mostly named after types of trees, and was named Markland Wood after its developer. The school officially opened in 1964, and underwent a large addition between 1968-69. It is named for the Silverthorn community that once occupied the area. Famous alumni include actress and model Estella Warren, actor Kiefer Sutherland, and Olympic bronze medal winning swimmer Brittany MacLean.

Bloordale Park North
20 Toledo Road
This 10.4-hectare park follows the Elmcrest Creek from Burnhamthorpe Road south to Bloor Street East in western Etobicoke. In addition to its many walking paths, the park features two outdoor tennis courts and a children's playground.

Elmcrest Creek
230 Renforth Drive
Elmcrest Creek continues through Bloordale Park and north to Burnhamthorpe Road, south of Centennial Park. The creek is a tributary of Etobicoke Creek. Like many ravines in Toronto, the creek connects with neighbourhood streets offering a beautiful path through central Etobicoke.

Tatjana Hutinec Artbox
Intersection of Bloor Street West and The West Mall
Expressions from the Tidal Pool presents an emotional vortex through paintings, which burst with colours and atmosphere. The images somewhat resemble inkblots or coffee cup readings, so they can be interpreted differently each time one looks at them.

4237 Bloor Street West Hydro House
4237 Bloor Street West
Note: Private Property. Please observe the house from the street only. This home may look normal on the outside, but it's really a hydro house! It's one of the many hydro transformers that are disguised as homes scattered throughout Toronto. Many of these were constructed in order to supply electricity to residential areas in a way that was visually-appealing to local homeowners. Toronto Hydro has since updated the ways in which it delivers electricity, and no longer constructs them. Etobicoke has the highest amount of these still remaining in Toronto.

Bloordale United Church
4258 Bloor Street West
This architecturally striking church almost looks like a UFO when viewed from afar. It was designed in 1960 by architect John Arthur Layng, with its circular shape finding favour with the church's minister at the time. The interior of the church features 12 arch ribs of laminated Douglas Fir, and uniquely does not have horizontal pews, but rather chairs situated in a circle to match the shape of the building. The church has been featured in NOW Magazine's Hidden Toronto series and has also served as a Doors Open Toronto location. It has undergone several alterations over the years, but is still considered to be an excellent example of radical mid-1900s modern architecture.

Neilson Park
56 Neilson Drive
This 6.6-hectare park near Dundas Street West and Highway 427 features a ball diamond and children's playground. The park follows the Etobicoke Creek ravine north to Bloor Street with a trail that crosses the creek. The southeast corner of the park is home to the Neilson Park Creative Centre.

Neilson Park Creative Centre
56 Neilson Drive
Neilson Park Creative Centre (NPCC) is a community arts centre. It offers various classes for all ages, camps, free exhibitions and hosts festivals year round. NPCC provides a permanent home for the six resident groups: Etobicoke Handweavers and Spinners, Etobicoke Quilters Guild, Etobicoke Rugcrafters, Humber Valley Art Club, The Etobicoke Art Group and Calligraphic Arts Guild of Toronto.

Silverthorn History Plaque
Southwest corner of Bloor Street West and Mill Road
This Heritage Toronto plaque highlights the history of the Silverthorn family in the area, who previously owned much of the land the neighbourhood is now situated on, and whom Silverthorn Collegiate Institute is named after. John Silverthorn was a United Empire Loyalist who purchased 160 hectares of land north of Dundas Street, east of Etobicoke Creek. Silverthorn and his son Aaron constructed a two-room cabin and a mill on the property that was able to produce about three thousand linear metres of lumber a day at its peak. A small farming community formed around this property, which became known as the District of Silverthorn, and then later the Village of Summerville. The farm remained in the Silverthorn family until 1958, when it was sold to developer Mark Cavotti and transformed into the Markland Wood subdivision.

Millwood Park
4370 Bloor Street West
This 4.2-hectare park on Bloor Street West near Mill Road in Etobicoke features two ball diamonds (one lit), three tennis courts, a gazebo and a children's playground. It was originally part of the Silverthorn farm that occupied much of this area. Millwood Park was created as part of the conditions of the farm's sale from the Silverthorn family to developer Mark Cavotti. The Silverthorn's were insistent that as many trees be preserved on their former property as possible, and so one of the woodlots was incorporated into what is now Millwood Park

Explore Markland Wood

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Hiba Abdallah
Montgomery’s Inn
4709 Dundas St W, Etobicoke, ON M9A 1A8

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This predominantly residential neighbourhood has deep agricultural roots as the site of the historic Silverthorn farm, which occupied this area for much of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It was developed into the exclusive Markland Wood residential enclave in the 1950s and 1960s, and has evolved into a leafy, suburban area with great parks, winding streets, and some unique architecture. Great local businesses can be found on Bloor Street West, Burnhamthorpe Road, Mill Road, and The West Mall.

Main Streets: Bloor Street West, Mill Road, Burnhamthorpe Road and The West Mall
  1. Silverthorn Collegiate Institute
    291 Mill Road
    Silverthorn Collegiate Institute was constructed in the early 1960s to serve the growing Markland Wood subdivision. The subdivision was created in 1958 by developer Mark Cavotti, who purchased much of the surrounding land from descendants of the Silverthorn family. The community featured large, wooded lots, with streets mostly named after types of trees, and was named Markland Wood after its developer. The school officially opened in 1964, and underwent a large addition between 1968-69. It is named for the Silverthorn community that once occupied the area. Famous alumni include actress and model Estella Warren, actor Kiefer Sutherland, and Olympic bronze medal winning swimmer Brittany MacLean.
  2. Bloordale Park North
    20 Toledo Road
    This 10.4-hectare park follows the Elmcrest Creek from Burnhamthorpe Road south to Bloor Street East in western Etobicoke. In addition to its many walking paths, the park features two outdoor tennis courts and a children's playground.
  3. Elmcrest Creek
    230 Renforth Drive
    Elmcrest Creek continues through Bloordale Park and north to Burnhamthorpe Road, south of Centennial Park. The creek is a tributary of Etobicoke Creek. Like many ravines in Toronto, the creek connects with neighbourhood streets offering a beautiful path through central Etobicoke.
  4. Tatjana Hutinec Artbox
    Intersection of Bloor Street West and The West Mall
    Expressions from the Tidal Pool presents an emotional vortex through paintings, which burst with colours and atmosphere. The images somewhat resemble inkblots or coffee cup readings, so they can be interpreted differently each time one looks at them.
  5. 4237 Bloor Street West Hydro House
    4237 Bloor Street West
    Note: Private Property. Please observe the house from the street only. This home may look normal on the outside, but it's really a hydro house! It's one of the many hydro transformers that are disguised as homes scattered throughout Toronto. Many of these were constructed in order to supply electricity to residential areas in a way that was visually-appealing to local homeowners. Toronto Hydro has since updated the ways in which it delivers electricity, and no longer constructs them. Etobicoke has the highest amount of these still remaining in Toronto.
  6. Bloordale United Church
    4258 Bloor Street West
    This architecturally striking church almost looks like a UFO when viewed from afar. It was designed in 1960 by architect John Arthur Layng, with its circular shape finding favour with the church's minister at the time. The interior of the church features 12 arch ribs of laminated Douglas Fir, and uniquely does not have horizontal pews, but rather chairs situated in a circle to match the shape of the building. The church has been featured in NOW Magazine's Hidden Toronto series and has also served as a Doors Open Toronto location. It has undergone several alterations over the years, but is still considered to be an excellent example of radical mid-1900s modern architecture.
  7. Neilson Park
    56 Neilson Drive
    This 6.6-hectare park near Dundas Street West and Highway 427 features a ball diamond and children's playground. The park follows the Etobicoke Creek ravine north to Bloor Street with a trail that crosses the creek. The southeast corner of the park is home to the Neilson Park Creative Centre.
  8. Neilson Park Creative Centre
    56 Neilson Drive
    Neilson Park Creative Centre (NPCC) is a community arts centre. It offers various classes for all ages, camps, free exhibitions and hosts festivals year round. NPCC provides a permanent home for the six resident groups: Etobicoke Handweavers and Spinners, Etobicoke Quilters Guild, Etobicoke Rugcrafters, Humber Valley Art Club, The Etobicoke Art Group and Calligraphic Arts Guild of Toronto.
  9. Silverthorn History Plaque
    Southwest corner of Bloor Street West and Mill Road
    This Heritage Toronto plaque highlights the history of the Silverthorn family in the area, who previously owned much of the land the neighbourhood is now situated on, and whom Silverthorn Collegiate Institute is named after. John Silverthorn was a United Empire Loyalist who purchased 160 hectares of land north of Dundas Street, east of Etobicoke Creek. Silverthorn and his son Aaron constructed a two-room cabin and a mill on the property that was able to produce about three thousand linear metres of lumber a day at its peak. A small farming community formed around this property, which became known as the District of Silverthorn, and then later the Village of Summerville. The farm remained in the Silverthorn family until 1958, when it was sold to developer Mark Cavotti and transformed into the Markland Wood subdivision.
  10. Millwood Park
    4370 Bloor Street West
    This 4.2-hectare park on Bloor Street West near Mill Road in Etobicoke features two ball diamonds (one lit), three tennis courts, a gazebo and a children's playground. It was originally part of the Silverthorn farm that occupied much of this area. Millwood Park was created as part of the conditions of the farm's sale from the Silverthorn family to developer Mark Cavotti. The Silverthorn's were insistent that as many trees be preserved on their former property as possible, and so one of the woodlots was incorporated into what is now Millwood Park

Accessibility information: Most points of interest on this stroll are viewable from the street. Some areas of Bloordale Park North and Millwood Park contain unpaved paths.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.