Milliken

Scarboro Village Plaza Mural
3300 Midland Avenue
The Scarboro Village Plaza includes a rich array of independent businesses and franchises including salons and restaurants. The mural portrays the changing cultural demographics in the surrounding Milliken neighbourhood depicting an early market when the area's population was mostly European immigrants alongside contemporary Asian markets. It was painted by artists Ian Jones, Larry Mar and William Lazos.

Ontario Chinese Art Association
Unit 102 - 3838 Midland Avenue
The Ontario Chinese Art Association (OCAA) is a non-profit organization that formed in 1979 to provide a platform for Chinese artists to connect and promote local and international artists and exhibitions. Originally located on Beverley Street in downtown Toronto, the OCAA moved to Scarborough as the Chinese population increased in the area. With over 300 members, the OCAA is an active organization that hosts exhibitions, seminars, art classes, members' art shows and gallery rentals.

Scarborough Chinese Baptist Church
3223 Kennedy Road
The Scarborough Chinese Baptist Church is a striking building, designed by Teeple Architects, with a large fluid structure and sweeping roof. The building includes a sanctuary that seats 1,600 people, multistorey Fellowship Hall, chapel, community spaces, gymnasium and library. The Toronto Chinese Baptist Church began with the first Chinese speaking worship service in 1967 in downtown Toronto's Chinatown. Due to the expanding Hong Kong Chinese community in Scarborough, another church was founded in 1987 on Birchmount Road. The congregation continued to grow until this structure was built in 2007 to service a multicultural and multilingual congregation.

Splendid China Mall
4675 Steeles Avenue East
Splendid China Mall is a Chinese-themed shopping centre that opened in 2007. With over 90,000 square feet of space and more than 150 stores across two floors, this large mall has a blocky exterior and is painted in beige and dark orange colours. Alongside numerous shops and eateries, the mall's indoor main stage has hosted numerous celebrations for festivals and holidays as well as several Chinese celebrity concerts.

Best and Banting Public School
380 Goldhawk Trail
Located near Steeles Avenue and McCowan Road, Best and Banting Public School is one of the Toronto District School Board's most northern schools. It was named after the Canadians, Dr. Frederick Banting and Dr. Charles Best, who discovered insulin at the University of Toronto in 1921.

Goldhawk Park
250 Goldhawk Trail
This 9.3-hectare park features three ball diamonds, a multipurpose sports field, two children's playgrounds, basketball court, as well as the Toronto Public Library's Goldhawk Branch right around the corner.

Milliken Park
5555 Steeles Avenue East
This 32-hectare park opened in 1993 and is home to many different birds, such as trumpeter swans and great blue herons. Other wonderful sights and facilities include the dozens of bike trails, ponds, landscaped gardens, picnic sites, playgrounds, and even a splash pad. The park is also one of the sites where the City of Toronto has hosted fireworks shows for past Canada Day celebrations.

Gursikh Sabha Canada
905 Middlefield Road
Gursikh Sabha Canada is one of the only gurdwaras in Toronto. A gurdwara is a place of worship for Sikhs, about 180,000 of which live in Canada, and Gursikh Sabha Canada has served the community in Toronto for many decades. They offer free meals to all visitors and operate a school on Sunday to teach children language, religion, and music.

Armadale Free Methodist Church
400 Passmore Avenue
Built in 1880, Armadale Free Methodist Church is the oldest Free Methodist Church in Canada. This small and simple white-painted church was largely built by volunteers and has retained most of its original structure. The pews and wood finish are originals and the woodwork is an authentic example of decorative graining, a finish made by stroking a type of curry comb through a thick layer of varnish. The church currently shares its space with the Tamil Church of Toronto and offers services in English and Tamil.

Underwood House
5933 Steeles Avenue East
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. Completed in 1891, the Underwood House is a designated property of historical, heritage, and architectural value. Named after the first owner, Richard Underwood, the building's heritage attributes are found on its exterior and has a prevalent nineteenth century design that stems from the expansion of the Ontario cottage style. Rising one and a half storeys from a stone foundation, the house has a running bond pattern of red brick. Decoration is limited to the lintels above the windows, which are painted to resemble label mouldings. It also has a simple porch that is shorter than usual and a single stack brick chimney that juts out of the roof.

Ismaili Community Center and Jamatkhana
695 Middlefield Road
The Ismaili Community Centre and Jamatkhana is one of the few gathering spaces for the Ismaili community in Scarborough. It is a wide building with a glass dome protruding out of its center and several arches frame the main entrance. Jamatkhanas are different from masjids as both secular and non-secular activities take place there and are specifically for Shia Ismaili Muslims, approximately 80,000 of which live in Canada.

Canada Sri Ayyappan Hindu Temple
635 Middlefield Road
Canada Sri Ayyappan Hindu Temple has been serving the Hindu community in Toronto since the 1990s. The temple has a very noticeable and colourful tower (called a gopuram) that can be seen from the outside, and also includes space for a daycare and banquet facilities. As the first Ayyappan temple established in Canada, it is also known for its uniqueness where rituals are performed in par with Sabarimala and are performed by learned scholars from India and Sri Lanka.

Explore Milliken

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Randell Adjei
Glendower Tower Residences
2821 Birchmount Road, Scarborough, ON M1W 2C8

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

Milliken is a neighbourhood in northeast Toronto. Formerly agricultural land, it is now a suburban community with plenty of green spaces, an iconic mall, public art pieces, and many places of worship that showcase Milliken's diverse population. Milliken is one of the most diverse neighbourhoods in the city with three quarters of its residents born outside of Canada. Great local businesses can be found on Midland Avenue, McCowan Road, Middlefield Road, and Markham Road.

Main Streets: Midland Avenue, McCowan Road, Middlefield Road and Markham Road
  1. Scarboro Village Plaza Mural
    3300 Midland Avenue
    The Scarboro Village Plaza includes a rich array of independent businesses and franchises including salons and restaurants. The mural portrays the changing cultural demographics in the surrounding Milliken neighbourhood depicting an early market when the area's population was mostly European immigrants alongside contemporary Asian markets. It was painted by artists Ian Jones, Larry Mar and William Lazos.
  2. Ontario Chinese Art Association
    Unit 102 - 3838 Midland Avenue
    The Ontario Chinese Art Association (OCAA) is a non-profit organization that formed in 1979 to provide a platform for Chinese artists to connect and promote local and international artists and exhibitions. Originally located on Beverley Street in downtown Toronto, the OCAA moved to Scarborough as the Chinese population increased in the area. With over 300 members, the OCAA is an active organization that hosts exhibitions, seminars, art classes, members' art shows and gallery rentals.
  3. Scarborough Chinese Baptist Church
    3223 Kennedy Road
    The Scarborough Chinese Baptist Church is a striking building, designed by Teeple Architects, with a large fluid structure and sweeping roof. The building includes a sanctuary that seats 1,600 people, multistorey Fellowship Hall, chapel, community spaces, gymnasium and library. The Toronto Chinese Baptist Church began with the first Chinese speaking worship service in 1967 in downtown Toronto's Chinatown. Due to the expanding Hong Kong Chinese community in Scarborough, another church was founded in 1987 on Birchmount Road. The congregation continued to grow until this structure was built in 2007 to service a multicultural and multilingual congregation.
  4. Splendid China Mall
    4675 Steeles Avenue East
    Splendid China Mall is a Chinese-themed shopping centre that opened in 2007. With over 90,000 square feet of space and more than 150 stores across two floors, this large mall has a blocky exterior and is painted in beige and dark orange colours. Alongside numerous shops and eateries, the mall's indoor main stage has hosted numerous celebrations for festivals and holidays as well as several Chinese celebrity concerts.
  5. Best and Banting Public School
    380 Goldhawk Trail
    Located near Steeles Avenue and McCowan Road, Best and Banting Public School is one of the Toronto District School Board's most northern schools. It was named after the Canadians, Dr. Frederick Banting and Dr. Charles Best, who discovered insulin at the University of Toronto in 1921.
  6. Goldhawk Park
    250 Goldhawk Trail
    This 9.3-hectare park features three ball diamonds, a multipurpose sports field, two children's playgrounds, basketball court, as well as the Toronto Public Library's Goldhawk Branch right around the corner.
  7. Milliken Park
    5555 Steeles Avenue East
    This 32-hectare park opened in 1993 and is home to many different birds, such as trumpeter swans and great blue herons. Other wonderful sights and facilities include the dozens of bike trails, ponds, landscaped gardens, picnic sites, playgrounds, and even a splash pad. The park is also one of the sites where the City of Toronto has hosted fireworks shows for past Canada Day celebrations.
  8. Gursikh Sabha Canada
    905 Middlefield Road
    Gursikh Sabha Canada is one of the only gurdwaras in Toronto. A gurdwara is a place of worship for Sikhs, about 180,000 of which live in Canada, and Gursikh Sabha Canada has served the community in Toronto for many decades. They offer free meals to all visitors and operate a school on Sunday to teach children language, religion, and music.
  9. Armadale Free Methodist Church
    400 Passmore Avenue
    Built in 1880, Armadale Free Methodist Church is the oldest Free Methodist Church in Canada. This small and simple white-painted church was largely built by volunteers and has retained most of its original structure. The pews and wood finish are originals and the woodwork is an authentic example of decorative graining, a finish made by stroking a type of curry comb through a thick layer of varnish. The church currently shares its space with the Tamil Church of Toronto and offers services in English and Tamil.
  10. Underwood House
    5933 Steeles Avenue East
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. Completed in 1891, the Underwood House is a designated property of historical, heritage, and architectural value. Named after the first owner, Richard Underwood, the building's heritage attributes are found on its exterior and has a prevalent nineteenth century design that stems from the expansion of the Ontario cottage style. Rising one and a half storeys from a stone foundation, the house has a running bond pattern of red brick. Decoration is limited to the lintels above the windows, which are painted to resemble label mouldings. It also has a simple porch that is shorter than usual and a single stack brick chimney that juts out of the roof.
  11. Ismaili Community Center and Jamatkhana
    695 Middlefield Road
    The Ismaili Community Centre and Jamatkhana is one of the few gathering spaces for the Ismaili community in Scarborough. It is a wide building with a glass dome protruding out of its center and several arches frame the main entrance. Jamatkhanas are different from masjids as both secular and non-secular activities take place there and are specifically for Shia Ismaili Muslims, approximately 80,000 of which live in Canada.
  12. Canada Sri Ayyappan Hindu Temple
    635 Middlefield Road
    Canada Sri Ayyappan Hindu Temple has been serving the Hindu community in Toronto since the 1990s. The temple has a very noticeable and colourful tower (called a gopuram) that can be seen from the outside, and also includes space for a daycare and banquet facilities. As the first Ayyappan temple established in Canada, it is also known for its uniqueness where rituals are performed in par with Sabarimala and are performed by learned scholars from India and Sri Lanka.

Accessibility information: All points of interest are viewable from paved sidewalks or paved park trails. However, there may be some unpaved paths and uneven surfaces within Goldhawk Park and Milliken District Park. There may also be additional barriers, including but not limited to stairs, steep inclines, and narrow passageways, along or at other destinations. There is extensive construction along Steeles Avenue East; Please practice extreme caution when navigating through this area.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.