Mount Olive-Silverstone-Jamestown

Garland Park
65 John Garland Boulevard
A small park near Kipling Avenue and Albion Road featuring an open green space that provides access to the West Humber Parkland and trails.

Elmbank Community Centre & Masseygrove Park
10 Rampart Road
Elmbank Community Centre is a multipurpose facility, with many programs for children, youth, adults and seniors from fitness to arts. Facilities focus on music and arts programs for children and youth, including a sound studio for instruction in music production and recording. The community centre is located in Masseygrove Park. This community park is home to a number of recreational facilities and community gardens, and backs onto Elmbank Junior Middle School and Greenholme Junior Middle School. Local residents have joined with City initiatives to plant native species of trees in the park as part of reforestation efforts, planting hundreds of trees in 2019 alone.

Toronto Public Library - Albion Branch
1515 Albion Road
The Albion Library originally opened in 1965 in the Albion Mall Shopping Centre, moving to its current location in 1973, and continuing to expand over the following decades. It is one of the busiest libraries in Toronto with more than 350,000 visitors annually. In 2017, the library opened in a spectacular new 28,000-square-foot building designed by Perkins + Will Canada Architects, that includes facilities for children, a youth hub, a Digital Innovation Hub that includes virtual reality, robotics and 3D printers, public computers, several outdoor reading gardens, and an art exhibit space. It is home to over 105,000 books in a variety of languages, including Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, Gujarati, Hindi, Italian, Punjabi, Persian, Somali, Spanish, Tagalog, Telegu, Tamil, Urdu and Vietnamese. The main part of the building has high ceilings and windows that let in a lot of natural light. On the exterior, colourful vertical beams give the building an interesting and unique look within the community.

Highfield Park
68 Stevenson Road
A 3.3 hectare park near Finch Avenue West and Albion Road that features two children's playgrounds, a splash pad and an open green space. A tributary to the Humber River flows along the western edge of the park.

Rexdale Community Hub
21 Panorama Court
The Rexdale Community Hub opened in 2012 and is one of seven community hubs in Toronto established as part of United Way Toronto's Building Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy (BSNS) to provide integrated services and programs for community members. The multi-service centre includes the Albion Neighbourhood Services, Delta Family Resource Centre, Rexdale Community Legal Clinic, Rexdale Women's Centre, the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Toronto, a satellite location of the Rexdale Community Health Centre and the City of Toronto's Employment & Social Services. At the hub, community members can access arts, recreational and educational programs for children, youth and seniors - career planning, childcare and employment as well as housing, legal and medical services. A mural along the entrance by Magicfinnga WonG (Basil Jardine) was painted in 2016 with the partnership of the Rexdale Community Health Centre and highlights moments in Rexdale's recent history, including the establishment of Rex Heslop Homes Ltd., the Woodbine Racetrack, and Rexdale resident P.K. Subban's drafting into the National Hockey League (NHL).

Learning Garden Hub
31 Panorama Court
Located in Panorama Park, the nearby Rexdale Community Health Centre operates the Learning Garden Hub, with programming run in partnership with Park People. The garden is used to engage local youth and residents in hands-on educational programs. This initiative began in 2013, and has continued to provide jobs, youth training and park stewardship opportunities for local communities. The garden developed from an initiative of the Weston Family Parks Challenge, supported by the W. Garfield Weston Foundation, to ensure the long-term sustainability of Toronto's parks through local community stewardship.

Former Thistletown Regional Centre for Children and Adolescents
51 Panorama Court
* Please note: This building is closed and not accessible to the public. Please view from the outside only. This heritage-designated former children's health care facility was set up by the Hospital for Sick Children when they purchased the land here in 1926. It was conceived of as a 'Palace of Sunshine', intended for children who were recuperating from maladies where a natural environment setting was thought to be helpful. It opened in 1928 with a 'parade' of young patients who arrived from the downtown hospital site. The hospital closed in the 1950s, and the property then became the Thistletown Regional Centre for Children and Adolescents, the first residential mental health centre for children and youths in Ontario. Ten small houses were constructed just south of the main building in the 1960s, intended for allowing youth with mental health issues to experience group living situations, which were thought to be healing. The hospital closed in 2014, but the buildings are still standing. Their future remains unknown.

Smithfield Park
173 Mount Olive Drive
A 4.5-hectare park on Martin Grove Road north of Albion Road featuring a lit ball diamond, a volleyball court, a skateboard area and a children's playground. A tributary to the Humber River flows along the south boundary of the park and is followed by trails in the park. Located in the park is the Smithfield Park Outdoor Pool.

Smithfield Middle School
175 Mount Olive Drive
Smithfield Middle School's origins go all the way back to 1845, when it was originally constructed. It was built to serve the small agricultural community of Smithfield, which was once situated at the corner of present-day Martin Grove Road and Albion Road. This school was upgraded to brick in 1874, and the current building opened in 1966. Today, the school serves 650 learners from a diverse population that speaks over 30 languages. There is a plaque located inside the school from the 1874 brick iteration of the school in the lobby, which remains the only surviving reminder of the Smithfield village.

North Humber Park
2851 Kipling Avenue
A 1.7-hectare park on Kipling Avenue south of Steeles Avenue West that features a ball diamond, a splash pad and a children's playground. A path leading to the east border of the park connects to the east branch of the Humber River and the Humber River Recreational Trail.

Explore Mount Olive-Silverstone-Jamestown

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Mark Reinhart
Thistletown Multi-Service Centre
925 Albion Rd, Etobicoke, ON M9V 1A6

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This culturally diverse suburban area in the far northwest corner of Toronto features many amenities, parkland, and some wonderful architecture - both old and new - scattered throughout. Several community centres act as hubs of the neighbourhood, offering a vast array of services to residents. Great local businesses can be found along Albion Road, Finch Avenue West, and Kipling Avenue.

Main Streets: Albion Road, Kipling Avenue and Finch Avenue West
  1. Garland Park
    65 John Garland Boulevard
    A small park near Kipling Avenue and Albion Road featuring an open green space that provides access to the West Humber Parkland and trails.
  2. Elmbank Community Centre & Masseygrove Park
    10 Rampart Road
    Elmbank Community Centre is a multipurpose facility, with many programs for children, youth, adults and seniors from fitness to arts. Facilities focus on music and arts programs for children and youth, including a sound studio for instruction in music production and recording. The community centre is located in Masseygrove Park. This community park is home to a number of recreational facilities and community gardens, and backs onto Elmbank Junior Middle School and Greenholme Junior Middle School. Local residents have joined with City initiatives to plant native species of trees in the park as part of reforestation efforts, planting hundreds of trees in 2019 alone.
  3. Toronto Public Library - Albion Branch
    1515 Albion Road
    The Albion Library originally opened in 1965 in the Albion Mall Shopping Centre, moving to its current location in 1973, and continuing to expand over the following decades. It is one of the busiest libraries in Toronto with more than 350,000 visitors annually. In 2017, the library opened in a spectacular new 28,000-square-foot building designed by Perkins + Will Canada Architects, that includes facilities for children, a youth hub, a Digital Innovation Hub that includes virtual reality, robotics and 3D printers, public computers, several outdoor reading gardens, and an art exhibit space. It is home to over 105,000 books in a variety of languages, including Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, Gujarati, Hindi, Italian, Punjabi, Persian, Somali, Spanish, Tagalog, Telegu, Tamil, Urdu and Vietnamese. The main part of the building has high ceilings and windows that let in a lot of natural light. On the exterior, colourful vertical beams give the building an interesting and unique look within the community.
  4. Highfield Park
    68 Stevenson Road
    A 3.3 hectare park near Finch Avenue West and Albion Road that features two children's playgrounds, a splash pad and an open green space. A tributary to the Humber River flows along the western edge of the park.
  5. Rexdale Community Hub
    21 Panorama Court
    The Rexdale Community Hub opened in 2012 and is one of seven community hubs in Toronto established as part of United Way Toronto's Building Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy (BSNS) to provide integrated services and programs for community members. The multi-service centre includes the Albion Neighbourhood Services, Delta Family Resource Centre, Rexdale Community Legal Clinic, Rexdale Women's Centre, the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Toronto, a satellite location of the Rexdale Community Health Centre and the City of Toronto's Employment & Social Services. At the hub, community members can access arts, recreational and educational programs for children, youth and seniors - career planning, childcare and employment as well as housing, legal and medical services. A mural along the entrance by Magicfinnga WonG (Basil Jardine) was painted in 2016 with the partnership of the Rexdale Community Health Centre and highlights moments in Rexdale's recent history, including the establishment of Rex Heslop Homes Ltd., the Woodbine Racetrack, and Rexdale resident P.K. Subban's drafting into the National Hockey League (NHL).
  6. Learning Garden Hub
    31 Panorama Court
    Located in Panorama Park, the nearby Rexdale Community Health Centre operates the Learning Garden Hub, with programming run in partnership with Park People. The garden is used to engage local youth and residents in hands-on educational programs. This initiative began in 2013, and has continued to provide jobs, youth training and park stewardship opportunities for local communities. The garden developed from an initiative of the Weston Family Parks Challenge, supported by the W. Garfield Weston Foundation, to ensure the long-term sustainability of Toronto's parks through local community stewardship.
  7. Former Thistletown Regional Centre for Children and Adolescents
    51 Panorama Court
    * Please note: This building is closed and not accessible to the public. Please view from the outside only. This heritage-designated former children's health care facility was set up by the Hospital for Sick Children when they purchased the land here in 1926. It was conceived of as a 'Palace of Sunshine', intended for children who were recuperating from maladies where a natural environment setting was thought to be helpful. It opened in 1928 with a 'parade' of young patients who arrived from the downtown hospital site. The hospital closed in the 1950s, and the property then became the Thistletown Regional Centre for Children and Adolescents, the first residential mental health centre for children and youths in Ontario. Ten small houses were constructed just south of the main building in the 1960s, intended for allowing youth with mental health issues to experience group living situations, which were thought to be healing. The hospital closed in 2014, but the buildings are still standing. Their future remains unknown.
  8. Smithfield Park
    173 Mount Olive Drive
    A 4.5-hectare park on Martin Grove Road north of Albion Road featuring a lit ball diamond, a volleyball court, a skateboard area and a children's playground. A tributary to the Humber River flows along the south boundary of the park and is followed by trails in the park. Located in the park is the Smithfield Park Outdoor Pool.
  9. Smithfield Middle School
    175 Mount Olive Drive
    Smithfield Middle School's origins go all the way back to 1845, when it was originally constructed. It was built to serve the small agricultural community of Smithfield, which was once situated at the corner of present-day Martin Grove Road and Albion Road. This school was upgraded to brick in 1874, and the current building opened in 1966. Today, the school serves 650 learners from a diverse population that speaks over 30 languages. There is a plaque located inside the school from the 1874 brick iteration of the school in the lobby, which remains the only surviving reminder of the Smithfield village.
  10. North Humber Park
    2851 Kipling Avenue
    A 1.7-hectare park on Kipling Avenue south of Steeles Avenue West that features a ball diamond, a splash pad and a children's playground. A path leading to the east border of the park connects to the east branch of the Humber River and the Humber River Recreational Trail.

Accessibility information: All points of interest in this stroll are viewable from the street. Smithfield Park has some paved paths, but visitors must cross over grass to access some of its amenities.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.