New Toronto

The Third Garden
1 Colonel Samuel Smith Park Drive
An art installation consisting of five cast iron seating forms, eight concrete pavers inlaid with bronze text, and landscaping. The couch forms are playful improvisations on a cliché associated with psychiatric care. The text in the pavers is based on oral and recorded histories of the former Lakeshore Psychiatric Hospital facilities on the Lakeshore Grounds, a prominent landmark setting in Etobicoke for more than 100 years.

Humber College Lakeshore Campus
2 Colonel Samuel Smith Park Drive
Many of the heritage listed buildings which now make up much of the Humber College Lakeshore Campus were once part of the former Lakeshore Psychiatric Hospital. When visiting this site, it's important to reflect upon and acknowledge that many of these buidlings were constucted by the patients themselves through forced labour. Long before the hospital was built, this location was also an important Indigenous travel way and trading path.

Colonel Samuel Smith Park
3145 Lake Shore Boulevard West
A large park situated on a stretch of wooden shoreline along Lake Ontario. The park is considered to be a top bird watching spot, has many urban wetlands trails, and has a popular ice skating trail in the winter.

Cliff Lumsdon Park
101 Lake Shore Drive
A hidden gem park on the shore of Lake Ontario offering fantastic views of downtown Toronto. The park is named after Cliff Lumsdon, a famous Canadian swimmer.

Prince of Wales Park
1 Third Street
Another park on the shore of Lake Ontario featuring fantastic views of downtown Toronto. This park also has a playground and artificial ice rink.

Chris Irvine Commemorating 50 Years of the Canadian Flag Mural
2938 Lake Shore Boulevard West
This heritage-designated building houses a local business that has a mural on the side. The Canadian flag was 50 years old in 2015. In celebration of this anniversary, local artist Chris Irvine painted this mural, which received the Outstanding Murals award at the Toronto Association of Business Improvement Areas in 2014.

Francis Muscat 'Untitled (Bell)' at Toronto Public Library: New Toronto Branch
110 Eleventh Street
An art installation of a bell from artist Francis Muscat in front of the New Toronto TPL Branch.

Eighth Street Skate Park
160 Eighth Street
A skateboard park that also features plenty of murals as part of the Eighth Street Skatepark Mural Project, headed by Lakeshore Arts. The first mural was painted in 2017, and several more were added in 2020. Mural artists include Chris Perez, Fats Patrol, Luvsumone, Nick Sweetman and Peru Dyer Jalea.

222 Islington Avenue - Boxer Building
222 Islington Avenue
A large heritage listed industrial building primarily constructed in the late 1800s/early 1900s. The building is a noteworthy example of Romanesque Revival architecture and acts as an important visual manifestation of the strong working class and manufacturing history of the area. The building now houses several different local businesses.

80 Birmingham Street - Historic Bell Telephone Building
80 Birmingham Street
A heritage listed building that dates to 1926 and designed in the Edwardian Classical style. The building was originally home to Bell Telephone, who required additional space to facilitate their rapidly expanding service in the area. The building is now known as the Birmingham Business Centre.

Toronto Public Library: New Toronto Branch
110 Eleventh St, Etobicoke, ON M8V 3G5
Poems For Your Path
Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Mark Reinhart

Explore New Toronto

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Mark Reinhart
New Toronto Branch
110 Eleventh St, Etobicoke, ON M8V 3G5

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This stroll features historic sites such as the Humber College Lakeshore Campus - which was the site of the Lakeshore Psychiatric Hospital - as well as plenty of greenspace along Lake Ontario such as Cliff Lumsdon Park and Prince of Wales Park. The stroll also reflects the working class history of the area with historic designated buildings such as the Boxer Building and 80 Birmingham Street. A number of fantastic local businesses can be visited along Lake Shore Boulevard West in the area's Lakeshore Village BIA.

Main Streets: Lake Shore Boulevard West
  1. The Third Garden
    1 Colonel Samuel Smith Park Drive
    An art installation consisting of five cast iron seating forms, eight concrete pavers inlaid with bronze text, and landscaping. The couch forms are playful improvisations on a cliché associated with psychiatric care. The text in the pavers is based on oral and recorded histories of the former Lakeshore Psychiatric Hospital facilities on the Lakeshore Grounds, a prominent landmark setting in Etobicoke for more than 100 years.
  2. Humber College Lakeshore Campus
    2 Colonel Samuel Smith Park Drive
    Many of the heritage listed buildings which now make up much of the Humber College Lakeshore Campus were once part of the former Lakeshore Psychiatric Hospital. When visiting this site, it's important to reflect upon and acknowledge that many of these buidlings were constucted by the patients themselves through forced labour. Long before the hospital was built, this location was also an important Indigenous travel way and trading path.
  3. Colonel Samuel Smith Park
    3145 Lake Shore Boulevard West
    A large park situated on a stretch of wooden shoreline along Lake Ontario. The park is considered to be a top bird watching spot, has many urban wetlands trails, and has a popular ice skating trail in the winter.
  4. Cliff Lumsdon Park
    101 Lake Shore Drive
    A hidden gem park on the shore of Lake Ontario offering fantastic views of downtown Toronto. The park is named after Cliff Lumsdon, a famous Canadian swimmer.
  5. Prince of Wales Park
    1 Third Street
    Another park on the shore of Lake Ontario featuring fantastic views of downtown Toronto. This park also has a playground and artificial ice rink.
  6. Chris Irvine Commemorating 50 Years of the Canadian Flag Mural
    2938 Lake Shore Boulevard West
    This heritage-designated building houses a local business that has a mural on the side. The Canadian flag was 50 years old in 2015. In celebration of this anniversary, local artist Chris Irvine painted this mural, which received the Outstanding Murals award at the Toronto Association of Business Improvement Areas in 2014.
  7. Francis Muscat 'Untitled (Bell)' at Toronto Public Library: New Toronto Branch
    110 Eleventh Street
    An art installation of a bell from artist Francis Muscat in front of the New Toronto TPL Branch.
  8. Eighth Street Skate Park
    160 Eighth Street
    A skateboard park that also features plenty of murals as part of the Eighth Street Skatepark Mural Project, headed by Lakeshore Arts. The first mural was painted in 2017, and several more were added in 2020. Mural artists include Chris Perez, Fats Patrol, Luvsumone, Nick Sweetman and Peru Dyer Jalea.
  9. 222 Islington Avenue - Boxer Building
    222 Islington Avenue
    A large heritage listed industrial building primarily constructed in the late 1800s/early 1900s. The building is a noteworthy example of Romanesque Revival architecture and acts as an important visual manifestation of the strong working class and manufacturing history of the area. The building now houses several different local businesses.
  10. 80 Birmingham Street - Historic Bell Telephone Building
    80 Birmingham Street
    A heritage listed building that dates to 1926 and designed in the Edwardian Classical style. The building was originally home to Bell Telephone, who required additional space to facilitate their rapidly expanding service in the area. The building is now known as the Birmingham Business Centre.
  11. Toronto Public Library: New Toronto Branch
    110 Eleventh St, Etobicoke, ON M8V 3G5
    Poems For Your Path
    Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
    Mark Reinhart

Accessibility information: All of the points of interest on this stroll are viewable from the street. Colonel Samuel Smith Park has unpaved and uneven surfaces.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.