Newtonbrook East

Bishop Allotment Gardens
190 Bishop Avenue
*Note: Please follow Toronto Public Health's guidelines for visiting community & allotment gardens. The Bishop Allotment Garden is one of the 12 allotment and 81 community gardens operated by the City of Toronto. Allotment gardens are traditionally found on a parcel of land which has been made available for non-commercial use to grow vegetables, fruits, or flowers and is accessible by payment of a membership or user fee. Unlike a community garden, where gardeners work as a collective to tend to the plots of land, allotment garden users are responsible for their own section of the property.

Church of St. Luke
3200 Bayview Avenue
While it may look like a series of luxury townhomes running along Bayview Avenue, this wall of stacked windows is actually the facade of the Church of St. Luke. Completed in 1959, this unusual design provides natural light in the sanctuary through the birch windows. This church was built in a mid-twentieth century expressionist style. Originally built for German Lutheran residents of the area, the current parish serves a much wider cultural community.

Bayview Arena Park
3240 Bayview Avenue
Bayview Arena Park is home to an indoor arena, the Willowdale Off-Leash Dog Park, and Bayview Arena Bike Park. The Bike Park features a series of dirt jumps, berms and tabletops accessible to riders with various skills and experience. The use of this bike park is free and rules are posted onsite.

St. John's Rehab (Sunnybrook Hospital)
285 Cummer Avenue
Starting in 1933, the Sisterhood of St. John the Divine began planning for a convalescent hospital in the Toronto area. Under a board of directors led by Vincent Massey, the first Governor General born in Canada, the financing and building of the facility was complete in 1937. When the doors opened, St. John's was the first hospital in the area to offer rehabilitative care. Following the Second World War, St. John's Rehab began to offer respite care for soldiers. As a leader in rehabilitative care, multiple new physical therapy facilities and hospital wings have been added to the complex, with the John C. and Sally Horsfall Eaton Centre for Ambulatory Care most recently built in 2012. St. John's Rehab Centre offers many unique and specialized rehabilitation and research programs, including Canada's only dedicated organ transplant rehabilitation program and Ontario's only dedicated burn rehabilitation program.

Newtonbrook Park
935 Willowdale Avenue
A 19.8-hectare park on Willowdale Avenue near Cummer Avenue that features a naturalized ravine with a trail running the length of the park. The east branch of the Don River emerges from the ground east of Willowdale Avenue.

GO Finch Bus Terminal & Finch Stations
5697 Yonge Street
The GO Finch Bus Terminal and Finch Stations serve as the terminus and hubs for the Toronto Transit Commission subway and bus lines, the GO Transit bus line, and York Region VIVA buses. The GO Terminal opened in 1974. It is connected to the Finch TTC Station via an underground tunnel. Finch Station, part of the Yonge Line expansion north from York Mills, also opened in 1974. It is currently the busiest TTC bus terminal. There are eight entrances to the station from the surrounding area, and an emergency exit south of the station at Yonge Street and Church Avenue.

Linda Covit 'Tracings' Installation
5791 Yonge Street
This multi-component artwork is integrated into the landscape design and facade of the building. The artwork components situated within the planter elements frame the main entrance and provide an elegant and sophisticated address. The rhythmic lighting components of the artwork complement the building facade and extend the artwork across the project site as a means of engaging building residents and pedestrians.

Alexander Robertson House
65 Centre Avenue
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. In 1914, Scottish-born gardener Alexander Robertson purchased Lot 28, a five-acre parcel of land. The home the family built on the property was valued at $1400 in the tax rolls. The Gothic-Revival home was completed at the start of the First World War, an era of transition from the Victorian style of the late nineteenth century to twentieth century classicism. This home also demonstrates the change from rural farmhouses to more modern suburban residences. The Robertson family lived in the home until 1944. The following owner, Marguerite Smith, lived in the home for over 30 years, even after starting to subdivide the lands around the house in 1952.

Centre Park
15 Centre Avenue
A 1.1-hectare, tree lined park near Yonge Street and Steeles Avenue East featuring a ball diamond and a children's playground.

Yonge Street - Toronto City Limits
Yonge Street & Steeles Avenue
Yonge Street is a main street in North York (and a main north-south thoroughfare in Toronto) and is one of the oldest roads in the province. Named by Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe after his friend Sir George Yonge, the road was originally a military and fur-trading path connecting Lake Ontario and Lake Simcoe. Yonge Street was known as the longest street in the world, however, it is only true if the street is considered to be a part of Highway 11, which is no longer the case. It's hard to imagine that in 1861, horse-drawn streetcar tracks were laid for the first time. Electric streetcars did not arrive until 1890 and 1973 marked the official opening of the York Mills subway station, with the final extension to Finch Avenue concluding a year later.

Lillian Park
227 Otonabee Avenue
A one-hectare park near Steeles Avenue East and Yonge Street that features three lit outdoor tennis courts and a children's playground.

Explore Newtonbrook East

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Women Paint
Gibson House Museum
5172 Yonge St, Toronto, ON M2N 5P7

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

Bordered by Steeles Avenue, the Newtonbrook East neighbourhood is at the northern border of the city. Stroll along Yonge Street in the Willowdale BIA and check out some of the local restaurants in a wide variety of cuisines. Explore the neighbourhood and discover the local parks, historic places, and community spaces.

Main Streets: Yonge Street
  1. Bishop Allotment Gardens
    190 Bishop Avenue
    *Note: Please follow Toronto Public Health's guidelines for visiting community & allotment gardens. The Bishop Allotment Garden is one of the 12 allotment and 81 community gardens operated by the City of Toronto. Allotment gardens are traditionally found on a parcel of land which has been made available for non-commercial use to grow vegetables, fruits, or flowers and is accessible by payment of a membership or user fee. Unlike a community garden, where gardeners work as a collective to tend to the plots of land, allotment garden users are responsible for their own section of the property.
  2. Church of St. Luke
    3200 Bayview Avenue
    While it may look like a series of luxury townhomes running along Bayview Avenue, this wall of stacked windows is actually the facade of the Church of St. Luke. Completed in 1959, this unusual design provides natural light in the sanctuary through the birch windows. This church was built in a mid-twentieth century expressionist style. Originally built for German Lutheran residents of the area, the current parish serves a much wider cultural community.
  3. Bayview Arena Park
    3240 Bayview Avenue
    Bayview Arena Park is home to an indoor arena, the Willowdale Off-Leash Dog Park, and Bayview Arena Bike Park. The Bike Park features a series of dirt jumps, berms and tabletops accessible to riders with various skills and experience. The use of this bike park is free and rules are posted onsite.
  4. St. John's Rehab (Sunnybrook Hospital)
    285 Cummer Avenue
    Starting in 1933, the Sisterhood of St. John the Divine began planning for a convalescent hospital in the Toronto area. Under a board of directors led by Vincent Massey, the first Governor General born in Canada, the financing and building of the facility was complete in 1937. When the doors opened, St. John's was the first hospital in the area to offer rehabilitative care. Following the Second World War, St. John's Rehab began to offer respite care for soldiers. As a leader in rehabilitative care, multiple new physical therapy facilities and hospital wings have been added to the complex, with the John C. and Sally Horsfall Eaton Centre for Ambulatory Care most recently built in 2012. St. John's Rehab Centre offers many unique and specialized rehabilitation and research programs, including Canada's only dedicated organ transplant rehabilitation program and Ontario's only dedicated burn rehabilitation program.
  5. Newtonbrook Park
    935 Willowdale Avenue
    A 19.8-hectare park on Willowdale Avenue near Cummer Avenue that features a naturalized ravine with a trail running the length of the park. The east branch of the Don River emerges from the ground east of Willowdale Avenue.
  6. GO Finch Bus Terminal & Finch Stations
    5697 Yonge Street
    The GO Finch Bus Terminal and Finch Stations serve as the terminus and hubs for the Toronto Transit Commission subway and bus lines, the GO Transit bus line, and York Region VIVA buses. The GO Terminal opened in 1974. It is connected to the Finch TTC Station via an underground tunnel. Finch Station, part of the Yonge Line expansion north from York Mills, also opened in 1974. It is currently the busiest TTC bus terminal. There are eight entrances to the station from the surrounding area, and an emergency exit south of the station at Yonge Street and Church Avenue.
  7. Linda Covit 'Tracings' Installation
    5791 Yonge Street
    This multi-component artwork is integrated into the landscape design and facade of the building. The artwork components situated within the planter elements frame the main entrance and provide an elegant and sophisticated address. The rhythmic lighting components of the artwork complement the building facade and extend the artwork across the project site as a means of engaging building residents and pedestrians.
  8. Alexander Robertson House
    65 Centre Avenue
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. In 1914, Scottish-born gardener Alexander Robertson purchased Lot 28, a five-acre parcel of land. The home the family built on the property was valued at $1400 in the tax rolls. The Gothic-Revival home was completed at the start of the First World War, an era of transition from the Victorian style of the late nineteenth century to twentieth century classicism. This home also demonstrates the change from rural farmhouses to more modern suburban residences. The Robertson family lived in the home until 1944. The following owner, Marguerite Smith, lived in the home for over 30 years, even after starting to subdivide the lands around the house in 1952.
  9. Centre Park
    15 Centre Avenue
    A 1.1-hectare, tree lined park near Yonge Street and Steeles Avenue East featuring a ball diamond and a children's playground.
  10. Yonge Street - Toronto City Limits
    Yonge Street & Steeles Avenue
    Yonge Street is a main street in North York (and a main north-south thoroughfare in Toronto) and is one of the oldest roads in the province. Named by Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe after his friend Sir George Yonge, the road was originally a military and fur-trading path connecting Lake Ontario and Lake Simcoe. Yonge Street was known as the longest street in the world, however, it is only true if the street is considered to be a part of Highway 11, which is no longer the case. It's hard to imagine that in 1861, horse-drawn streetcar tracks were laid for the first time. Electric streetcars did not arrive until 1890 and 1973 marked the official opening of the York Mills subway station, with the final extension to Finch Avenue concluding a year later.
  11. Lillian Park
    227 Otonabee Avenue
    A one-hectare park near Steeles Avenue East and Yonge Street that features three lit outdoor tennis courts and a children's playground.

Accessibility information: All points of interest are visible from the sidewalk or residential roads. Not all residential roads have sidewalks, but roads are paved and level. Note that Bayview Avenue has a slight incline.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.