Scarborough Village

Washington Manse
14 Centre Street
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. Built in 1875, this was one of the first dwellings built in the village of Scarborough. This heritage designated house was built by the Washington Methodist congregation for the church's clergy.

Village of Scarborough
155 Markham Road
The Village of Scarborough was first established as a settlement in the 1800s as a result of the horse-and-buggy traffic on Kingston Road and northward along Markham Road. With the hustle and bustle centered on Markham Road between Kingston Road and Eglinton Avenue, this spot was the centerpoint of the historic village. Businesses that could be found in this area in the nineteenth century included a blacksmith, a wagon shop, Gates' 'Scarboro Inn', Baird's Hotel and Chester's General Store. Today, the only link to the original village is Christ Church on the east side of Markham Road, though this is the third iteration of the church (built in 1936).

Scarborough Village Recreation Centre and Theatre
3600 Kingston Road
This community centre offers a wide range of recreational programs for everyone from preschoolers to seniors. It's also the only community centre in Scarborough that has a theatre! Originally located in an old church along Denton Avenue, this theatre was then known as Playhouse 66. In 1982, it relocated to the community centre. It's home to the Scarborough Music Theatre, Scarborough Players, and Scarborough Theatre Guild.

Universal Declaration of Human Rights Article #27 Mural
3600 Kingston Road
This mural was created in 2008 by YOUTHLINK, a Scarborough community-based mental health centre for youth. The mural pays homage to Article #27 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states that, everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to 'enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits.'

Cornell-Campbell House
3620 Kingston Road
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the gardens only. William Cornell settled at this farmhouse in 1799. Credited with numerous firsts for the township, he planted the first orchard, built the first gristmill and sawmill, and potash works (a factory for converting wood ashes to materials that could be used for soap, ceramics and glass). He and other settlers cut out the main road in Scarborough, later named Kingston Road. His son, Edward, was a member of Scarborough's first municipal council in 1850. Later on, the farmhouse was the home of Albert M. Campbell, the first mayor of Scarborough from 1967 to 1969, and his wife Helen, a descendent of the original Cornell family. Acquired by the City of Toronto, the house now serves as the Rouge National Urban Park's head office, but the garden area is still open to the public.

Fred Johnson Park
3630 Kingston Road
This park is named after Fred Johnson, former City of Scarborough Councillor from 1988 until amalgamation in 1997. Known for his dedication to creating sports and music opportunities for youth in his community, Johnson was named Scarborough Citizen of the Year in 1978. Inside the park sits a gazebo and the Scarborough Village Community Garden, run by volunteers so local residents can grow their own fruits, vegetables, herbs and berries.

Doris McCarthy Trail
Where Ravine Drive becomes Bellehaven Crescent
This trail is named after the late Calgary artist, Doris McCarthy (1910 - 2010), and combines some of her favourite things: art, nature and the Canadian landscape. Doris was best known for her landscape paintings. Her home 'Fool's Paradise' is located along the Bluffs just west of this trail.

Gates Gully Bellamy Ravine
Along Doris McCarthy Trail
Gates Gully is named after well-known European settler Jonathan Gates who settled in the area in 1815. Gates later operated the Scarboro Inn, also known as Gates Tavern, on Kingston Road (just east of Bellamy Road). The ravine is the earliest known site of human occupation in the GTA. Artifacts dating back eight to ten thousand years ago have been found onsite, indicating that Indigenous peoples in the area used this ravine to access the lake. When European settlers arrived, Gates Gully continued to be used as an water access route by European soldiers, merchants and smugglers as its gentle incline made it easy to transport cargo.

Sylvan Park
Where Doris McCarthy Trail reaches the lake
Sylvan Park was named after the nearby Sylvan Avenue. Sylvanus is the name of a woodland deity in Roman mythology and Sylvan refers to the woodsy character of the area. An earlier name for the park was the Cherry Orchard.

Marlene Hilton Moore 'Passage'
Kingston Road and Ravine Drive (at the foot of Doris McCarthy Trail)
Created by artist Marlene Hilton Moore, 'Passage' honours Doris McCarthy and the Scarborough Bluffs with a fish and canoe. This sculpture is a part of Moore's series to mark people and places throughout Canada.

Explore Scarborough Village

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Kate Nankervis
Oakridge Park
3459 Danforth Ave, Scarborough, ON M1L 1C9

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This stroll through the Scarborough Village neighbourhood leads through historical sites like Washington Manse and explores local public art. Indulge in a tasty selection of cuisine including Caribbean, Middle Eastern and Asian while walking along the neighbourhood's main streets - Eglinton Avenue East, Markham Road, and Kingston Road - before stepping into the Gates Gully Bellamy Ravine that leads to the lake.

Main Streets: Eglinton Avenue East, Markham Road and Kingston Road
  1. Washington Manse
    14 Centre Street
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. Built in 1875, this was one of the first dwellings built in the village of Scarborough. This heritage designated house was built by the Washington Methodist congregation for the church's clergy.
  2. Village of Scarborough
    155 Markham Road
    The Village of Scarborough was first established as a settlement in the 1800s as a result of the horse-and-buggy traffic on Kingston Road and northward along Markham Road. With the hustle and bustle centered on Markham Road between Kingston Road and Eglinton Avenue, this spot was the centerpoint of the historic village. Businesses that could be found in this area in the nineteenth century included a blacksmith, a wagon shop, Gates' 'Scarboro Inn', Baird's Hotel and Chester's General Store. Today, the only link to the original village is Christ Church on the east side of Markham Road, though this is the third iteration of the church (built in 1936).
  3. Scarborough Village Recreation Centre and Theatre
    3600 Kingston Road
    This community centre offers a wide range of recreational programs for everyone from preschoolers to seniors. It's also the only community centre in Scarborough that has a theatre! Originally located in an old church along Denton Avenue, this theatre was then known as Playhouse 66. In 1982, it relocated to the community centre. It's home to the Scarborough Music Theatre, Scarborough Players, and Scarborough Theatre Guild.
  4. Universal Declaration of Human Rights Article #27 Mural
    3600 Kingston Road
    This mural was created in 2008 by YOUTHLINK, a Scarborough community-based mental health centre for youth. The mural pays homage to Article #27 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states that, everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to 'enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits.'
  5. Cornell-Campbell House
    3620 Kingston Road
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the gardens only. William Cornell settled at this farmhouse in 1799. Credited with numerous firsts for the township, he planted the first orchard, built the first gristmill and sawmill, and potash works (a factory for converting wood ashes to materials that could be used for soap, ceramics and glass). He and other settlers cut out the main road in Scarborough, later named Kingston Road. His son, Edward, was a member of Scarborough's first municipal council in 1850. Later on, the farmhouse was the home of Albert M. Campbell, the first mayor of Scarborough from 1967 to 1969, and his wife Helen, a descendent of the original Cornell family. Acquired by the City of Toronto, the house now serves as the Rouge National Urban Park's head office, but the garden area is still open to the public.
  6. Fred Johnson Park
    3630 Kingston Road
    This park is named after Fred Johnson, former City of Scarborough Councillor from 1988 until amalgamation in 1997. Known for his dedication to creating sports and music opportunities for youth in his community, Johnson was named Scarborough Citizen of the Year in 1978. Inside the park sits a gazebo and the Scarborough Village Community Garden, run by volunteers so local residents can grow their own fruits, vegetables, herbs and berries.
  7. Doris McCarthy Trail
    Where Ravine Drive becomes Bellehaven Crescent
    This trail is named after the late Calgary artist, Doris McCarthy (1910 - 2010), and combines some of her favourite things: art, nature and the Canadian landscape. Doris was best known for her landscape paintings. Her home 'Fool's Paradise' is located along the Bluffs just west of this trail.
  8. Gates Gully Bellamy Ravine
    Along Doris McCarthy Trail
    Gates Gully is named after well-known European settler Jonathan Gates who settled in the area in 1815. Gates later operated the Scarboro Inn, also known as Gates Tavern, on Kingston Road (just east of Bellamy Road). The ravine is the earliest known site of human occupation in the GTA. Artifacts dating back eight to ten thousand years ago have been found onsite, indicating that Indigenous peoples in the area used this ravine to access the lake. When European settlers arrived, Gates Gully continued to be used as an water access route by European soldiers, merchants and smugglers as its gentle incline made it easy to transport cargo.
  9. Sylvan Park
    Where Doris McCarthy Trail reaches the lake
    Sylvan Park was named after the nearby Sylvan Avenue. Sylvanus is the name of a woodland deity in Roman mythology and Sylvan refers to the woodsy character of the area. An earlier name for the park was the Cherry Orchard.
  10. Marlene Hilton Moore 'Passage'
    Kingston Road and Ravine Drive (at the foot of Doris McCarthy Trail)
    Created by artist Marlene Hilton Moore, 'Passage' honours Doris McCarthy and the Scarborough Bluffs with a fish and canoe. This sculpture is a part of Moore's series to mark people and places throughout Canada.

Accessibility information: All points of interest are viewable from the street except The Doris McCarthy Trail and 'Passage'. The Doris McCarthy Trail is unpaved and weather conditions could change the quality of the trail. 'Passage' is only viewable by walking one kilometre down a steep decline in the Doris McCarthy Trail. A rest area is available halfway to 'Passage' to sit and rest. The Scarborough Village Recreation Centre and Fred Johnson Park have paved pathways throughout.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.