St. Andrew-Windfields

C.W. Jeffreys Home & Plaque
4111 Yonge Street
*Note: Private Property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. This brick cottage was built around 1833 by Rowland Burr. Burr was responsible for straightening Yonge Street at Hogg's Hollow in the 1830s and, ironically, the house was moved backwards in 1956 to allow for the widening of the same stretch of road. From 1922 to 1951, Canadian artist C.W. Jeffreys owned the home. Jeffreys is well known for his paintings of distinctive Canadian scenes. He taught at the University of Toronto, and was the president of the Ontario Society of Artists. A plaque dedicated to Jeffreys can be seen at the south end of the property, next to the staircase that leads to the hill to St. John's Church.

St. John's Rectory
174 Old Yonge Street
*Note: Private Property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. By the 1870s, the congregation at St. John's was looking to build a new rectory. The plans of Mr. Fisher of Eglinton, a carpenter and lumber merchant, were approved in 1876, and construction was completed under the direction of contractor Joseph Pennock. The first clergyman to live in the rectory was Canon Henry Bath Osler. The design of the home exemplifies the modest scale and symmetry of Victorian values. The rectory and church are among the few buildings from the nineteenth century in the community that have not been moved.

St. John's Anglican Church
19 Don Ridge Drive
St. John's Anglican Church was built in 1843-1844 and is one of the oldest buildings in North York, designed by John George Howard to replace an earlier building. St. John's was the first Anglican church built outside the Town of York. Over time, expansions were added to the building to serve the growing needs of the community, but the sanctuary and the tower still retain their original design. The cemetery located next to the church building is the resting place of many early North York residents. There are some notable interments here, including hockey player Lionel Conacher and artist C. W. Jefferys.

Owen Park
150 Gordon Road
Owen Park offers a 1.2-hectare park near York Mills Road and Bayview Avenue that features a children's playground and an open green space.

La Belle Maison (Schitt's Creek Mansion)
30 Fifeshire Road
*Note: Private Property. Please observe this house from the sidewalk only. This home was used for the interiors of the Rose Family mansion at the beginning of Schitt's Creek, the award-winning Canadian comedy series. The 24,000 square foot La Belle Maison was built in 2012, and features a Sistine-Chapel inspired foyer. While the exterior of the home was not featured in the television series, the interior represented the luxurious life the Roses left behind.

Kirkwood Park
25 Kirkwood Road
Kirkwood Park on Leslie Street near York Mills Road features four lit outdoor tennis courts, a children's playground and an open green space.

Gosia Komorski Artbox
1865 Leslie Street
I chose to represent the surrounding area with a quilt of patterns that juxtapose natural elements and man-made structures including the West Highland Creek, Scarborough Butterfly Trail, Huron-Wendat village, St. Andrews Rd, Thompson Memorial Park, Gatineau Hydro Corridor and the neighbourhood bungalows.

Duncan Gingerbread Farmhouse
125 Moatfield Drive
David Duncan was a dairy farmer, and the first to introduce Jersey cows (prized for their milk which contains a high butterfat and protein content) to Ontario. He named the land at York Mills and Don Mills Moatfield, still the name of the local parkland. He also built a farmhouse on the lands around 1865. This home is one of the last remaining examples of the Gothic gingerbread style in Ontario. The building was relocated to its current location in 1986, and has been designated as a heritage building.

Moatfield Farm Park, William Goodwin House & Clark Locke House
355 Lesmill Road
Moatfield Farm Park, named by dairy farmer David Duncan who built a home in the area, offers an outdoor sportsfield and green space. In the park are two heritage buildings: William Goodwin House and the Clark Locke House. The wooden framed Goodwin House was built around 1845, and moved to the park from its original location on Yonge Street in 1982. Clark Locke House, with its distinctive Tudor style design, was built in 1933. Both buildings are now in use by Ontario Nature as office space. Please observe the buildings from the outside only.

Eva's Place
360 Lesmill Road
Eva's Place opened in 1994, and is the first youth shelter in North York to provide a wide range of services and support to prevent and reduce youth homelessness. The shelter is named after Eva Maud Smith, who emigrated from Jamaica in 1956 as a domestic worker. She became a school outreach worker and community leader focused on youth. Her crusade to provide support for youth (which was lacking in the adult shelter system) resulted in the creation of the North York Emergency Home for Youth in 1989, later Eva's Place. Smith's vision for social support now serves hundreds of youth and their families, offering shelter & housing, street outreach, counselling, training and life skills programs.

Explore St. Andrew-Windfields

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Hiba Abdallah
Toronto Public Library: Mount Pleasant Branch
599 Mt Pleasant Rd, Toronto, ON M4S 2M5

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

Stroll through St. Andrew-Windfields to find an expansive residential neighbourhood, which has provided homes for a famous artist, several successful dairy families, and even a fictitious television family... These historic and modern homes are situated among a collection of green spaces to explore and discover, and great local businesses can be found on Leslie Street.

Main Streets: Leslie Street
  1. C.W. Jeffreys Home & Plaque
    4111 Yonge Street
    *Note: Private Property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. This brick cottage was built around 1833 by Rowland Burr. Burr was responsible for straightening Yonge Street at Hogg's Hollow in the 1830s and, ironically, the house was moved backwards in 1956 to allow for the widening of the same stretch of road. From 1922 to 1951, Canadian artist C.W. Jeffreys owned the home. Jeffreys is well known for his paintings of distinctive Canadian scenes. He taught at the University of Toronto, and was the president of the Ontario Society of Artists. A plaque dedicated to Jeffreys can be seen at the south end of the property, next to the staircase that leads to the hill to St. John's Church.
  2. St. John's Rectory
    174 Old Yonge Street
    *Note: Private Property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. By the 1870s, the congregation at St. John's was looking to build a new rectory. The plans of Mr. Fisher of Eglinton, a carpenter and lumber merchant, were approved in 1876, and construction was completed under the direction of contractor Joseph Pennock. The first clergyman to live in the rectory was Canon Henry Bath Osler. The design of the home exemplifies the modest scale and symmetry of Victorian values. The rectory and church are among the few buildings from the nineteenth century in the community that have not been moved.
  3. St. John's Anglican Church
    19 Don Ridge Drive
    St. John's Anglican Church was built in 1843-1844 and is one of the oldest buildings in North York, designed by John George Howard to replace an earlier building. St. John's was the first Anglican church built outside the Town of York. Over time, expansions were added to the building to serve the growing needs of the community, but the sanctuary and the tower still retain their original design. The cemetery located next to the church building is the resting place of many early North York residents. There are some notable interments here, including hockey player Lionel Conacher and artist C. W. Jefferys.
  4. Owen Park
    150 Gordon Road
    Owen Park offers a 1.2-hectare park near York Mills Road and Bayview Avenue that features a children's playground and an open green space.
  5. La Belle Maison (Schitt's Creek Mansion)
    30 Fifeshire Road
    *Note: Private Property. Please observe this house from the sidewalk only. This home was used for the interiors of the Rose Family mansion at the beginning of Schitt's Creek, the award-winning Canadian comedy series. The 24,000 square foot La Belle Maison was built in 2012, and features a Sistine-Chapel inspired foyer. While the exterior of the home was not featured in the television series, the interior represented the luxurious life the Roses left behind.
  6. Kirkwood Park
    25 Kirkwood Road
    Kirkwood Park on Leslie Street near York Mills Road features four lit outdoor tennis courts, a children's playground and an open green space.
  7. Gosia Komorski Artbox
    1865 Leslie Street
    I chose to represent the surrounding area with a quilt of patterns that juxtapose natural elements and man-made structures including the West Highland Creek, Scarborough Butterfly Trail, Huron-Wendat village, St. Andrews Rd, Thompson Memorial Park, Gatineau Hydro Corridor and the neighbourhood bungalows.
  8. Duncan Gingerbread Farmhouse
    125 Moatfield Drive
    David Duncan was a dairy farmer, and the first to introduce Jersey cows (prized for their milk which contains a high butterfat and protein content) to Ontario. He named the land at York Mills and Don Mills Moatfield, still the name of the local parkland. He also built a farmhouse on the lands around 1865. This home is one of the last remaining examples of the Gothic gingerbread style in Ontario. The building was relocated to its current location in 1986, and has been designated as a heritage building.
  9. Moatfield Farm Park, William Goodwin House & Clark Locke House
    355 Lesmill Road
    Moatfield Farm Park, named by dairy farmer David Duncan who built a home in the area, offers an outdoor sportsfield and green space. In the park are two heritage buildings: William Goodwin House and the Clark Locke House. The wooden framed Goodwin House was built around 1845, and moved to the park from its original location on Yonge Street in 1982. Clark Locke House, with its distinctive Tudor style design, was built in 1933. Both buildings are now in use by Ontario Nature as office space. Please observe the buildings from the outside only.
  10. Eva's Place
    360 Lesmill Road
    Eva's Place opened in 1994, and is the first youth shelter in North York to provide a wide range of services and support to prevent and reduce youth homelessness. The shelter is named after Eva Maud Smith, who emigrated from Jamaica in 1956 as a domestic worker. She became a school outreach worker and community leader focused on youth. Her crusade to provide support for youth (which was lacking in the adult shelter system) resulted in the creation of the North York Emergency Home for Youth in 1989, later Eva's Place. Smith's vision for social support now serves hundreds of youth and their families, offering shelter & housing, street outreach, counselling, training and life skills programs.

Accessibility information: All points of interest are visible from the street. Some residential roads may not have sidewalk access. Sidewalks along Yonge Street and York Mills Road are very steep in some areas. There is a steep stone staircase on Yonge Street to St. John's Church which is maintained, but may be difficult to navigate.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.