Stonegate-Queensway

Kevin Henriques Artbox
3379 Bloor Street West
'Positive Vibes' intends to be both striking and energetic. This work manipulates the dimensionality of the box to transform it into a sculptural object; not to take away from the box, but to highlight it as a significant element in the built environment.

Alea Drain Artbox
3015 Bloor Street West
Designed by artist Alea Drain, the painting on this artbox is based on a series of botanical drawings. The different forms and shapes sprouting out from each other create the whimsical appearance of a growing, living organism. The box can be found right at the intersection of Bloor Street West and Royal York Road.

Park Lawn Cemetery, Mausoleum, and Cremation Centre
2845 Bloor Street West
The Park Lawn Cemetery, Mausoleum, and Cremation Centre has been a resting place in the community since it first opened as the Humbervale Cemetery in 1892. Attempts were made to develop the land in the early 1900s but community members defended the cemetery. The property ended up being sold to the Park Lawn Cemetery Company in 1915, giving the cemetery its current name and allowing it to remain a resting place for local residents. A number of prominent Torontonians are buried in the cemetery, including musician Jeff Healey and politician Stanley Haidasz. The grounds of the graveyard offer a tranquil space for residents to stroll through and take in the natural beauty of the surrounding King's Mill Park.

Bell Manor Park
1 Bayside Lane
*Note: Please follow Toronto Public Health's guidelines for visiting community & allotment gardens. Tucked along Bayside Lane, Bell Manor Park offers a beautiful green space to stroll through, complete with a playground and a splash pad. This park also features a community garden and a work of public art, both supported by the Stonegate Community Health Centre (CHC), located on Berry Road. The community garden provides a safe and secure space for local residents to grow their own herbs, flowers, fruits, and vegetables. As you walk through the park, keep an eye out for the colourful murals on the pathway, painted by children, youth groups, and adults through Stonegate CHC community programs. This mural painting project was led by Toronto artist Natalie Very B.

Oculus Pavilion
Humber River Recreational Trail (within South Humber Park)
Located in the South Humber Park along the Humber River Recreational Trail, the Oculus Pavilion is a hidden gem of the neighbourhood. Designed by architect Alan Crossley and consulting engineer Laurence Cazaly in 1958, the Oculus was created as a modernist art piece resting on top of a public washroom. Though the washrooms have since closed, the Oculus remains a unique landmark of the Space Age for visitors hiking through the park. The Oculus was one of a number of public park pavilions installed in Toronto parks throughout the 50s and 60s. Though it has fallen into disuse over the years, there has been a recent push for revitalizing the Oculus as a community gathering space by the Architectural Conservancy of Ontario.

Blaze Wiradharma Mural
172 The Queensway
Designed by artist Blaze Wiradharma, this mural is part of the StreetARToronto (StART) program. StART provides artists with the materials for graffiti art to create vivid, colourful, community-engaged art, replacing vandalism on streets and in public spaces. Wiradharma is a graduate of the Ontario College of Art and Design University, and has worked as a mural artist, illustrator, and graphic designer. He places a focus on culture, technology, and the human relationship to the environment through his art. Wiradharma's piece adds a bright touch to a Queensway parking lot.

Noble House
35 Daniels Street
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. Located at the corner of Daniels Street and McIntosh Avenue, this home was built between 1852 and 1861 on the property owned by Herod and Mary Noble. One of the older houses in the neighbourhood, it was constructed on what was once a major market gardening area. Notable for its open verandah and Gothic-style window on the upper storey, this house is listed on the City of Toronto's Inventory of Heritage Properties.

Jeff Healey Park
1 Delroy Drive
Located on Park Lawn Road near the Queensway, Jeff Healey Park features bike trails, a playground, tennis courts, ball diamond, and a view of Mimico Creek along the northern borders of the park. Previously called Woodford Park, the name was changed in 2011 to honour famous jazz and blues-rock musician Jeff Healey, who passed away in 2008. Healey was blind since his early childhood, and taught himself to play the guitar by laying it flat on his lap. His distinct style led to his successful and renowned music career, earning him a Grammy nomination and a Juno win. Healey grew up in Etobicoke and enjoyed visiting the park throughout his life. The musical play equipment installed in the playground honours his legacy.

Queensway Park
8 Avon Park Drive
Located just off The Queensway on Avon Park Drive, Queensway Park provides a number of recreational activities including a playground, ball diamond, tennis courts, and an outdoor rink and skate trail. The homes on the circular streets surrounding Queensway Park also offer a glimpse at the neighbourhood's history. The one-and-a-half storey homes surrounding the park were built in 1945 to 1946 for veterans returning from the Second Word War. While many of these houses have undergone different alterations throughout the years, they still reflect the distinct architectural style of this building project, including steep pitched roofs and small sash windows.

Eden Court Plaque
523 Royal York Road
*Note: Private Property. Please observe the plaque and the building from the sidewalk only. The red brick facade of this house has been preserved from the 1889 farmhouse built for Edward Stock, a prominent local businessman, politician, farmer, and benefactor. While many of the original features of this home are now gone, the facade of the original building was incorporated into the residential development of this home, completed in 2010. The original home went through many changes since its construction. The house transferred ownership from the Stock family in the 1930s to Willie Morrisey, who operated it as a gaming house, open to both men and women. The house was later acquired by the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 217 in 1951 and remained in use by them until 2004.

Explore Stonegate-Queensway

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Mark Reinhart
New Toronto Branch
110 Eleventh St, Etobicoke, ON M8V 3G5

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This stroll explores the beautiful green spaces in the Stonegate-Queensway neighbourhood, while highlighting the vibrant public art, architecture, and heritage of the area. Enjoy colourful public art pieces such as the murals designed by community members and Toronto artists in Bell Manor Park, and experience how the neighbourhood has changed over time by viewing heritage buildings such as the former residence of prominent community member Edward Stock, and the unique architectural feature of the Oculus Pavillion by the Humber River. The stroll leads you through both the Kingsway and the Shop the Queensway BIAs, allowing you to visit a diverse selection of local shops and restaurants.

Main Streets: The Queensway and Bloor Street West
  1. Kevin Henriques Artbox
    3379 Bloor Street West
    'Positive Vibes' intends to be both striking and energetic. This work manipulates the dimensionality of the box to transform it into a sculptural object; not to take away from the box, but to highlight it as a significant element in the built environment.
  2. Alea Drain Artbox
    3015 Bloor Street West
    Designed by artist Alea Drain, the painting on this artbox is based on a series of botanical drawings. The different forms and shapes sprouting out from each other create the whimsical appearance of a growing, living organism. The box can be found right at the intersection of Bloor Street West and Royal York Road.
  3. Park Lawn Cemetery, Mausoleum, and Cremation Centre
    2845 Bloor Street West
    The Park Lawn Cemetery, Mausoleum, and Cremation Centre has been a resting place in the community since it first opened as the Humbervale Cemetery in 1892. Attempts were made to develop the land in the early 1900s but community members defended the cemetery. The property ended up being sold to the Park Lawn Cemetery Company in 1915, giving the cemetery its current name and allowing it to remain a resting place for local residents. A number of prominent Torontonians are buried in the cemetery, including musician Jeff Healey and politician Stanley Haidasz. The grounds of the graveyard offer a tranquil space for residents to stroll through and take in the natural beauty of the surrounding King's Mill Park.
  4. Bell Manor Park
    1 Bayside Lane
    *Note: Please follow Toronto Public Health's guidelines for visiting community & allotment gardens. Tucked along Bayside Lane, Bell Manor Park offers a beautiful green space to stroll through, complete with a playground and a splash pad. This park also features a community garden and a work of public art, both supported by the Stonegate Community Health Centre (CHC), located on Berry Road. The community garden provides a safe and secure space for local residents to grow their own herbs, flowers, fruits, and vegetables. As you walk through the park, keep an eye out for the colourful murals on the pathway, painted by children, youth groups, and adults through Stonegate CHC community programs. This mural painting project was led by Toronto artist Natalie Very B.
  5. Oculus Pavilion
    Humber River Recreational Trail (within South Humber Park)
    Located in the South Humber Park along the Humber River Recreational Trail, the Oculus Pavilion is a hidden gem of the neighbourhood. Designed by architect Alan Crossley and consulting engineer Laurence Cazaly in 1958, the Oculus was created as a modernist art piece resting on top of a public washroom. Though the washrooms have since closed, the Oculus remains a unique landmark of the Space Age for visitors hiking through the park. The Oculus was one of a number of public park pavilions installed in Toronto parks throughout the 50s and 60s. Though it has fallen into disuse over the years, there has been a recent push for revitalizing the Oculus as a community gathering space by the Architectural Conservancy of Ontario.
  6. Blaze Wiradharma Mural
    172 The Queensway
    Designed by artist Blaze Wiradharma, this mural is part of the StreetARToronto (StART) program. StART provides artists with the materials for graffiti art to create vivid, colourful, community-engaged art, replacing vandalism on streets and in public spaces. Wiradharma is a graduate of the Ontario College of Art and Design University, and has worked as a mural artist, illustrator, and graphic designer. He places a focus on culture, technology, and the human relationship to the environment through his art. Wiradharma's piece adds a bright touch to a Queensway parking lot.
  7. Noble House
    35 Daniels Street
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. Located at the corner of Daniels Street and McIntosh Avenue, this home was built between 1852 and 1861 on the property owned by Herod and Mary Noble. One of the older houses in the neighbourhood, it was constructed on what was once a major market gardening area. Notable for its open verandah and Gothic-style window on the upper storey, this house is listed on the City of Toronto's Inventory of Heritage Properties.
  8. Jeff Healey Park
    1 Delroy Drive
    Located on Park Lawn Road near the Queensway, Jeff Healey Park features bike trails, a playground, tennis courts, ball diamond, and a view of Mimico Creek along the northern borders of the park. Previously called Woodford Park, the name was changed in 2011 to honour famous jazz and blues-rock musician Jeff Healey, who passed away in 2008. Healey was blind since his early childhood, and taught himself to play the guitar by laying it flat on his lap. His distinct style led to his successful and renowned music career, earning him a Grammy nomination and a Juno win. Healey grew up in Etobicoke and enjoyed visiting the park throughout his life. The musical play equipment installed in the playground honours his legacy.
  9. Queensway Park
    8 Avon Park Drive
    Located just off The Queensway on Avon Park Drive, Queensway Park provides a number of recreational activities including a playground, ball diamond, tennis courts, and an outdoor rink and skate trail. The homes on the circular streets surrounding Queensway Park also offer a glimpse at the neighbourhood's history. The one-and-a-half storey homes surrounding the park were built in 1945 to 1946 for veterans returning from the Second Word War. While many of these houses have undergone different alterations throughout the years, they still reflect the distinct architectural style of this building project, including steep pitched roofs and small sash windows.
  10. Eden Court Plaque
    523 Royal York Road
    *Note: Private Property. Please observe the plaque and the building from the sidewalk only. The red brick facade of this house has been preserved from the 1889 farmhouse built for Edward Stock, a prominent local businessman, politician, farmer, and benefactor. While many of the original features of this home are now gone, the facade of the original building was incorporated into the residential development of this home, completed in 2010. The original home went through many changes since its construction. The house transferred ownership from the Stock family in the 1930s to Willie Morrisey, who operated it as a gaming house, open to both men and women. The house was later acquired by the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 217 in 1951 and remained in use by them until 2004.

Accessibility information: The walk takes place on streets and paved paths. All points of interest are viewable from a street or a path. The paths in Park Lawn Cemetery, Bell Manor Park, South Humber Park, Jeff Healey Park, and Queensway Park may be more difficult to maneuver depending on weather conditions.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.