Toronto Island

Toronto Island Ferries & Ward's Island Ferry Docks
Ward's Island Ferry Docks
Ferries have been traversing the short route across Toronto Harbour from the mainland to Toronto Island Park for almost 180 years, with the first vessel - a boat powered by two horses walking on a treadmill - entering commercial service in 1833. At this time, Toronto Island was actually a peninsula connected to the mainland near the mouth of the Don River. A violent storm in April 1858 permanently severed the island from the mainland, creating the now 300-metre wide Eastern Gap. Most of the ferries still operating to the island today are diesel boats constructed between 1935 and 1960. One vessel, the Trillium, is over 100 years old, and is the only sidewheel paddle steamer still sailing in North America! While ferry services operate to 2 other different points on the island for much of the year (Centre Island and Hanlan's Point), Ward's Island is the only dock that offers year-round service.

Ward's Island Homes
Area to the north and east of Ward's Island Ferry Docks
Ward's Island was named after David Ward, a local fisherman who settled near here around 1830. Ward's son William built a hotel in 1882, which spurred development on the land around it. Many of the plots here originally featured small, crowded tents that island-goers set up in the summer months. The City granted permission to replace these tents with houses in the 1930s, which explains the relatively small lot sizes of the homes today. In the 1960s, local government decided Toronto Island should be turned entirely into parkland, and the homes here were threatened with demolition. A lengthy legal battle ensued, which was ultimately won by Ward's Island residents, with their property rights preserved under a special piece of legislation passed in 1993. About 250 homes remain on Ward's Island today, housing approximately 600 residents. Many of these homes are unique from almost any others found in Toronto, located on tightly-packed, tiny plots of land and most featuring a humble, cottage-style look.

Fire Station 335 & Gordon Peteran 'Fire & Water' Installation, & Toronto Island Disc Golf Course
235 Cibola Avenue
*Please note this is an active fire station. Please do not block driveway. The only fire station on Toronto Island features a public art installation from 1995 named 'Fire and Water' by artist Gordon Peteran. The piece is a brass, copper, bronze, and wood clock on the side of the station's tower. The hands of the clock are a trident and lightning bolt, while the numbers are things such as clouds, a star, and a bird, which is meant to represent nature on the island. Located right beside the fire station is the Toronto Island Disc Golf Course. The course offers a long, challenging layout with great views of the city skyline. The course was established in 1980, and hosted the Disc Golf World Championships in 1987.

St. Andrew by-the-Lake Anglican Church
On pathway off of Cibola Avenue, across the water from Far Enough Farm
This heritage-designated wooden church designed by architect AR Dennison dates back to 1884. Prominent nineteenth century Toronto families such as the Masseys and Gooderhams - who summered on the island - helped bring the church to fruition. Dennison utilized a semi-Gothic variation on an architectural style that was mostly used on cottages and summer hotels, giving the church a unique design. The church also features beautiful stained glass windows that were installed in the 1920s by noted artist Robert McCausland. It was moved to its present location in 1959, after being sawed in two and with great care taken to ensure that no damage was done to the windows. One unique tradition at the church is the 'Blessing of the Boats', where a number of vessels mostly from nearby yacht clubs are blessed by the rector, which has occurred annually in a lagoon behind the church since 1949.

Centreville Amusement Park & Far Enough Farm
On Centre Island, southeast of the Centre Island Ferry Docks
Centreville Amusement Park opened in 1967, featuring amusement rides, a petting zoo, and a full size replica of a small Ontario town. The park was created as part of the government's plan to transform the island from a residential community to parkland, after many of the homes and businesses that were previously located here were demolished in the 1960s. Today Centreville features more than 30 rides and 14 food outlets, primarily geared towards families with young children. Some of the more notable rides include a roller coaster that is modelled after a mine train, a ferris wheel that resembles a wind mill, and a sky ride that offers great views of the park and surrounding island. Another popular part of Centreville is Far Enough Farm, a petting farm that was originally established in 1959. The farm features over 40 different species of animals, including rabbits, goats, chickens, ponies, and cows, and offers visitors the opportunity to interact with them.

William Meany Maze
Avenue of the Islands (southwest of the bridge), Centre Island
The William Meany Maze is a hedge maze that opened in 2014, replacing a previous hedge maze that was removed in 2011. The original maze was designed by Dutch landscape designer Peter Vanderwerf, and was installed in 1967. William Meany, a Mississauga businessman who was fond of the maze as a child, was saddened by its removal, and donated money for the creation of a new one. The maze features 1,200 black cedars, and with most of them at least 7-feet in height, even the tallest individuals will have to use their wits to navigate their way out! One other intriguing aspect of the maze is the bell that is located at its centre, which was recovered from the Island Public School - the island's first schoolhouse - which burned down in 1909.

Manitou Road Plaque
At intersection of Avenue of the Island and Lakeshore Avenue
This plaque commemorates the history of Manitou Road, a street that was once the main commercial thoroughfare on Centre Island. In the early twentieth century, numerous businesses popped up along the road, including a general store, butcher shop, dairy, boathouse, laundries, and several hotels. It also became an entertainment hub, featuring a casino, bowling alley, and movie theatre. After the Metropolitan Toronto Council expropriated the land here for parkland, all of the businesses along Manitou Road were demolished, and it was transformed into the concrete walkway that it is today.

Centre Island Pier
At the south end of Avenue of the Islands over Lake Ontario
This beautiful Y-shaped pier juts right out into the waters of Lake Ontario, providing spectacular views across the lake, as well as back towards the Toronto skyline. It was originally constructed in the 1960s as part of Metro Toronto's plans to turn the entirety of island into parklands. Part of the plan was to include a large 2,400 seat amphitheatre on this site, which never came to fruition. There are binoculars at the end of the pier that allow users to get an even closer look of the lake and surrounding area.

Franklin Children's Garden
The Mall, Centre Island
This theme garden is based on characters from the celebrated 'Franklin the Turtle' book series written by Paulette Bourgeois, and illustrated by Brenda Clark (both of whom are Canadian). It is divided into seven sections for gardening, storytelling, and exploring wildlife. It features several bronze statues of Franklin and his friends, as well as some benches, plants and paths, and a turtle pond. There is also a hill at the top of the Snail Trail that is the highest point on the island, and features a pair of binoculars that allow visitors to check out the view. A small amphitheatre on site plays host to special events, shows, storytelling, and camp sessions.

Artscape Gibraltar Point
443 Lakeshore Avenue
*Private property. Please observe from the street only. Artscape Gibraltar Point is a secluded community cultural hub surrounded by 46 acres of parkland and its own beachfront, offering artists an ideal place to work, as well as a space for events. It is housed in the old Toronto Island Public and Natural School building, which was threatened with demolition in the 1990s. Artscape - a not-for-profit group of arts and cultural organizations - partnered with the City of Toronto to create a new vision for the site that included a retreat centre, artists lodge, and long-term artist work studios. Since opening in 1999, it has hosted thousands of local and international artists in residence. A recording studio at the facility has been utilized for albums recorded by artists such as Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Gord Downie, Julie Doiron, and Tuvan throat singers from Mongolia.

Gibraltar Point Lighthouse
On pathway slightly north of Lakeshore Avenue, near Hanlan's Bay
Now over 200 years old, this historic lighthouse is the oldest that can be found on the Great Lakes, and the second oldest in Canada. It was originally constructed in 1808-09 from limestone brought in from Queenston, near Niagara Falls. The first lighthouse keepers were among the first European settlers on Toronto Island, and formed the core of the community which developed there throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The lighthouse shone its last light out over the waters of Lake Ontario in 1957, after which it was replaced by a fully automated tower nearby. The lighthouse is also known for a famous ghost story involving lighthouse keeper John Rademuller, who went missing on January 2, 1815. Legend has it that Rademuller was murdered by soldiers, and that his ghost still haunts the site to this day.

Hanlan's Point Beach
Accessible from Beach Road, southwest of the Hanlan's Point Ferry Docks
The largest beach on Toronto Island, Hanlan's Point Beach is one of two clothing-optional beaches in Canada. It became known as a LGBTQ2S+-friendly gathering spot in the 1970s. In August 1971, Toronto Gay Action, the University of Toronto Homophile Association, and the Community Homophile Association of Toronto organized an event at the beach called 'Gay Day', which attracted hundreds of people. This event is now regarded by many activists as one of Toronto's first displays of gay and lesbian solidarity, and helped lay the groundwork for future Toronto Pride celebrations. A one-kilometre stretch of the beach was officially recognized as 'clothing optional' in 2002 after important work by groups such as Totally Naked Toronto, as well as lawyer Peter Simm. Hanlan's Point Beach is one of two that are blue flag certified in Toronto Island Park, meaning that its waters are tested daily during the summer months for quality. If a blue flag is flying, it means that it is safe to swim.

Babe Ruth's First Home Run Plaque
Near western end of Lakeshore Avenue, slightly west of the Hanlan's Point Ferry Docks
A Heritage Toronto plaque notes that American baseball legend Babe Ruth hit his very first professional home run not far from here. Although it is mostly all parkland now, Hanlan's Point was once home to Maple Leaf Park, a baseball stadium where the Toronto Maple Leafs baseball team played. The stadium opened in 1867 as part of the Hanlan's Point Amusement Park on the site, where there was also hotels and amusement rides. Babe Ruth was only 19 years old when on September 5, 1914, playing for the minor league Providence Grays, hit his very first professional home run over the fence in right field. Ruth also pitched the game and allowed only one hit, helping lead the Grays to a 9-0 win. The Maple Leafs moved to another stadium near the foot of Bathurst Street in 1926, and Maple Leaf Park was demolished and the site redeveloped as the Toronto Island Airport.

Emanuel Hahn 'Edward Hanlan' Statue and Plaque
Beside Hanlan's Point Ferry Docks
Edward 'Ned' Hanlan was born in Toronto in 1855, and grew up on Toronto Island not far from where this statue is located. (Hanlan's Point is named for Ned's parents). Hanlan began rowing at a very young age, often crossing Lake Ontario to attend school on the mainland. He was one of the top rowers in the world by the late 1870s, and became the World Champion sculler by winning a race in London on November 15, 1880, a title he retained until 1884. Hanlan was internationally famous for his accomplishments, and remains regarded as one of the top rowers of all time. After retiring in 1897, Hanlan served as an Alderman for Toronto Island in 1898 and 1899. When he died of pneuomonia in 1908, over 10,000 people came to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church on King Street to pay their respects. The statue of Hanlan greeting those exiting the ferry at Hanlan's Point was erected by sculptor Emanuel Hahn in 1926.

Explore Toronto Island

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Women Paint
Toronto Public Library: Fort York Branch
190 Fort York Blvd, Toronto, ON M5V 0E7

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

The Toronto Islands have long been regarded as a special and sacred place among Mississauga and other First Nations. Named 'Minesing' in Anishinaabemowin, meaning 'island' or 'on the island', the Mississaugas recognized the special character of the islands as a place of healing, medicine, and relaxation. Though there is no evidence that any large villages were established on the islands, they often camped and held ceremonies and councils here.

The Toronto Islands are continually shifting and changing, sculpted by storms and the water currents of Lake Ontario which move sand and other material from the eroding Scarborough Bluffs westward and deposited to create the sandbars that form the islands. One account, originating from Kanien’kehá:ka (Mohawk) oral tradition, tells of how the islands were formed all at once from a violent storm or hurricane that hit the area centuries ago. Kanien'kehá:ka knowledge keeper William Smith shared in 1954 that a great storm toppled trees and swallowed land, culminating in a great upheaval that formed the islands and left a significant mass of felled trees and debris in the bay between the islands and the lakeshore (Chandler, Al. 'Island Made in a Hurricane.' Globe and Mail, December 19th 1954). At the time Europeans first began to visit the area the Toronto Islands were actually a peninsula, connected to the mainland by a thin sand bar. Since then, storms periodically washed away parts of the sand bar connecting the islands to the mainland. British settlers would continually repair these gaps until 1858, when a large storm again severed the connection to the islands, and it was not repaired. Since then, the peninsula has remained an island.

Waterways, islands, peninsulas, and lakeshores have been important places for fishing, camping, and medicine gathering for the Mississaugas. When British settlers entered into treaty negotiations with the Mississaugas for the lands along the north shore of Lake Ontario, continued access to the waterways for land-based ways of life was of paramount importance for the Mississaugas. During the negotiations for the Gunshot Treaty in 1788 oral evidence exists that the Mississaugas negotiated for protected access to all the creeks, rivers, lakeshores, peninsulas, and islands. The Mississaugas also maintain that they did not cede or surrender their rights to the Toronto Islands during the problematic Toronto Purchases of 1787 and 1805 and continued to visit and camp on the islands as they always had in the aftermath of these treaty negotiations. Although the Mississaugas were eventually forced to surrender their claim to the Toronto Islands in a more recent treaty settlement in 2010, more recently, settler residents of the Toronto Islands have been building relationships with the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation. The islands remain an important place for healing, relaxation, land-based ways of life, and ceremony for many Indigenous people in the Toronto area.

Introduction written by: Dr. Jon Johnson, First Story

Main Streets: Lakeshore Avenue, Cibola Avenue, Avenue of the Islands (Please note that only emergency and commercial service vehicles (e.g., utility, delivery, construction, etc.) that are properly identified are issued a vehicle permit and allowed passage to the Toronto Islands.)
  1. Toronto Island Ferries & Ward's Island Ferry Docks
    Ward's Island Ferry Docks
    Ferries have been traversing the short route across Toronto Harbour from the mainland to Toronto Island Park for almost 180 years, with the first vessel - a boat powered by two horses walking on a treadmill - entering commercial service in 1833. At this time, Toronto Island was actually a peninsula connected to the mainland near the mouth of the Don River. A violent storm in April 1858 permanently severed the island from the mainland, creating the now 300-metre wide Eastern Gap. Most of the ferries still operating to the island today are diesel boats constructed between 1935 and 1960. One vessel, the Trillium, is over 100 years old, and is the only sidewheel paddle steamer still sailing in North America! While ferry services operate to 2 other different points on the island for much of the year (Centre Island and Hanlan's Point), Ward's Island is the only dock that offers year-round service.
  2. Ward's Island Homes
    Area to the north and east of Ward's Island Ferry Docks
    Ward's Island was named after David Ward, a local fisherman who settled near here around 1830. Ward's son William built a hotel in 1882, which spurred development on the land around it. Many of the plots here originally featured small, crowded tents that island-goers set up in the summer months. The City granted permission to replace these tents with houses in the 1930s, which explains the relatively small lot sizes of the homes today. In the 1960s, local government decided Toronto Island should be turned entirely into parkland, and the homes here were threatened with demolition. A lengthy legal battle ensued, which was ultimately won by Ward's Island residents, with their property rights preserved under a special piece of legislation passed in 1993. About 250 homes remain on Ward's Island today, housing approximately 600 residents. Many of these homes are unique from almost any others found in Toronto, located on tightly-packed, tiny plots of land and most featuring a humble, cottage-style look.
  3. Fire Station 335 & Gordon Peteran 'Fire & Water' Installation, & Toronto Island Disc Golf Course
    235 Cibola Avenue
    *Please note this is an active fire station. Please do not block driveway. The only fire station on Toronto Island features a public art installation from 1995 named 'Fire and Water' by artist Gordon Peteran. The piece is a brass, copper, bronze, and wood clock on the side of the station's tower. The hands of the clock are a trident and lightning bolt, while the numbers are things such as clouds, a star, and a bird, which is meant to represent nature on the island. Located right beside the fire station is the Toronto Island Disc Golf Course. The course offers a long, challenging layout with great views of the city skyline. The course was established in 1980, and hosted the Disc Golf World Championships in 1987.
  4. St. Andrew by-the-Lake Anglican Church
    On pathway off of Cibola Avenue, across the water from Far Enough Farm
    This heritage-designated wooden church designed by architect AR Dennison dates back to 1884. Prominent nineteenth century Toronto families such as the Masseys and Gooderhams - who summered on the island - helped bring the church to fruition. Dennison utilized a semi-Gothic variation on an architectural style that was mostly used on cottages and summer hotels, giving the church a unique design. The church also features beautiful stained glass windows that were installed in the 1920s by noted artist Robert McCausland. It was moved to its present location in 1959, after being sawed in two and with great care taken to ensure that no damage was done to the windows. One unique tradition at the church is the 'Blessing of the Boats', where a number of vessels mostly from nearby yacht clubs are blessed by the rector, which has occurred annually in a lagoon behind the church since 1949.
  5. Centreville Amusement Park & Far Enough Farm
    On Centre Island, southeast of the Centre Island Ferry Docks
    Centreville Amusement Park opened in 1967, featuring amusement rides, a petting zoo, and a full size replica of a small Ontario town. The park was created as part of the government's plan to transform the island from a residential community to parkland, after many of the homes and businesses that were previously located here were demolished in the 1960s. Today Centreville features more than 30 rides and 14 food outlets, primarily geared towards families with young children. Some of the more notable rides include a roller coaster that is modelled after a mine train, a ferris wheel that resembles a wind mill, and a sky ride that offers great views of the park and surrounding island. Another popular part of Centreville is Far Enough Farm, a petting farm that was originally established in 1959. The farm features over 40 different species of animals, including rabbits, goats, chickens, ponies, and cows, and offers visitors the opportunity to interact with them.
  6. William Meany Maze
    Avenue of the Islands (southwest of the bridge), Centre Island
    The William Meany Maze is a hedge maze that opened in 2014, replacing a previous hedge maze that was removed in 2011. The original maze was designed by Dutch landscape designer Peter Vanderwerf, and was installed in 1967. William Meany, a Mississauga businessman who was fond of the maze as a child, was saddened by its removal, and donated money for the creation of a new one. The maze features 1,200 black cedars, and with most of them at least 7-feet in height, even the tallest individuals will have to use their wits to navigate their way out! One other intriguing aspect of the maze is the bell that is located at its centre, which was recovered from the Island Public School - the island's first schoolhouse - which burned down in 1909.
  7. Manitou Road Plaque
    At intersection of Avenue of the Island and Lakeshore Avenue
    This plaque commemorates the history of Manitou Road, a street that was once the main commercial thoroughfare on Centre Island. In the early twentieth century, numerous businesses popped up along the road, including a general store, butcher shop, dairy, boathouse, laundries, and several hotels. It also became an entertainment hub, featuring a casino, bowling alley, and movie theatre. After the Metropolitan Toronto Council expropriated the land here for parkland, all of the businesses along Manitou Road were demolished, and it was transformed into the concrete walkway that it is today.
  8. Centre Island Pier
    At the south end of Avenue of the Islands over Lake Ontario
    This beautiful Y-shaped pier juts right out into the waters of Lake Ontario, providing spectacular views across the lake, as well as back towards the Toronto skyline. It was originally constructed in the 1960s as part of Metro Toronto's plans to turn the entirety of island into parklands. Part of the plan was to include a large 2,400 seat amphitheatre on this site, which never came to fruition. There are binoculars at the end of the pier that allow users to get an even closer look of the lake and surrounding area.
  9. Franklin Children's Garden
    The Mall, Centre Island
    This theme garden is based on characters from the celebrated 'Franklin the Turtle' book series written by Paulette Bourgeois, and illustrated by Brenda Clark (both of whom are Canadian). It is divided into seven sections for gardening, storytelling, and exploring wildlife. It features several bronze statues of Franklin and his friends, as well as some benches, plants and paths, and a turtle pond. There is also a hill at the top of the Snail Trail that is the highest point on the island, and features a pair of binoculars that allow visitors to check out the view. A small amphitheatre on site plays host to special events, shows, storytelling, and camp sessions.
  10. Artscape Gibraltar Point
    443 Lakeshore Avenue
    *Private property. Please observe from the street only. Artscape Gibraltar Point is a secluded community cultural hub surrounded by 46 acres of parkland and its own beachfront, offering artists an ideal place to work, as well as a space for events. It is housed in the old Toronto Island Public and Natural School building, which was threatened with demolition in the 1990s. Artscape - a not-for-profit group of arts and cultural organizations - partnered with the City of Toronto to create a new vision for the site that included a retreat centre, artists lodge, and long-term artist work studios. Since opening in 1999, it has hosted thousands of local and international artists in residence. A recording studio at the facility has been utilized for albums recorded by artists such as Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Gord Downie, Julie Doiron, and Tuvan throat singers from Mongolia.
  11. Gibraltar Point Lighthouse
    On pathway slightly north of Lakeshore Avenue, near Hanlan's Bay
    Now over 200 years old, this historic lighthouse is the oldest that can be found on the Great Lakes, and the second oldest in Canada. It was originally constructed in 1808-09 from limestone brought in from Queenston, near Niagara Falls. The first lighthouse keepers were among the first European settlers on Toronto Island, and formed the core of the community which developed there throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The lighthouse shone its last light out over the waters of Lake Ontario in 1957, after which it was replaced by a fully automated tower nearby. The lighthouse is also known for a famous ghost story involving lighthouse keeper John Rademuller, who went missing on January 2, 1815. Legend has it that Rademuller was murdered by soldiers, and that his ghost still haunts the site to this day.
  12. Hanlan's Point Beach
    Accessible from Beach Road, southwest of the Hanlan's Point Ferry Docks
    The largest beach on Toronto Island, Hanlan's Point Beach is one of two clothing-optional beaches in Canada. It became known as a LGBTQ2S+-friendly gathering spot in the 1970s. In August 1971, Toronto Gay Action, the University of Toronto Homophile Association, and the Community Homophile Association of Toronto organized an event at the beach called 'Gay Day', which attracted hundreds of people. This event is now regarded by many activists as one of Toronto's first displays of gay and lesbian solidarity, and helped lay the groundwork for future Toronto Pride celebrations. A one-kilometre stretch of the beach was officially recognized as 'clothing optional' in 2002 after important work by groups such as Totally Naked Toronto, as well as lawyer Peter Simm. Hanlan's Point Beach is one of two that are blue flag certified in Toronto Island Park, meaning that its waters are tested daily during the summer months for quality. If a blue flag is flying, it means that it is safe to swim.
  13. Babe Ruth's First Home Run Plaque
    Near western end of Lakeshore Avenue, slightly west of the Hanlan's Point Ferry Docks
    A Heritage Toronto plaque notes that American baseball legend Babe Ruth hit his very first professional home run not far from here. Although it is mostly all parkland now, Hanlan's Point was once home to Maple Leaf Park, a baseball stadium where the Toronto Maple Leafs baseball team played. The stadium opened in 1867 as part of the Hanlan's Point Amusement Park on the site, where there was also hotels and amusement rides. Babe Ruth was only 19 years old when on September 5, 1914, playing for the minor league Providence Grays, hit his very first professional home run over the fence in right field. Ruth also pitched the game and allowed only one hit, helping lead the Grays to a 9-0 win. The Maple Leafs moved to another stadium near the foot of Bathurst Street in 1926, and Maple Leaf Park was demolished and the site redeveloped as the Toronto Island Airport.
  14. Emanuel Hahn 'Edward Hanlan' Statue and Plaque
    Beside Hanlan's Point Ferry Docks
    Edward 'Ned' Hanlan was born in Toronto in 1855, and grew up on Toronto Island not far from where this statue is located. (Hanlan's Point is named for Ned's parents). Hanlan began rowing at a very young age, often crossing Lake Ontario to attend school on the mainland. He was one of the top rowers in the world by the late 1870s, and became the World Champion sculler by winning a race in London on November 15, 1880, a title he retained until 1884. Hanlan was internationally famous for his accomplishments, and remains regarded as one of the top rowers of all time. After retiring in 1897, Hanlan served as an Alderman for Toronto Island in 1898 and 1899. When he died of pneuomonia in 1908, over 10,000 people came to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church on King Street to pay their respects. The statue of Hanlan greeting those exiting the ferry at Hanlan's Point was erected by sculptor Emanuel Hahn in 1926.

Accessibility information: Many of the points of interest on this stroll are viewable from paved paths. The Toronto Island Disc Golf Course, Centreville & Far Enough Farm, William Meany Maze, Franklin Children's Garden, Gibraltar Point Lighthouse, and Hanlan's Point Beach all involve using unpaved areas to fully access. The only way to access Toronto Island is by boat. (It is not possible to get to Toronto Island Park via the tunnel to Billy Bishop Airport). All City of Toronto-operated ferries are wheelchair accessible on all main decks. Please note that if travelling to Toronto Island in the winter that ferry service is only available to Ward's Island. More information on ferry schedules can be found here: https://www.toronto.ca/explore-enjoy/parks-gardens-beaches/toronto-island-park/all-ferry-schedules/

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.