Victoria Village

Jonesville Allotment Gardens
Intersection of Jonesville Crescent and Victoria Park Avenue
*Note: Please follow Toronto Public Health's guidelines for visiting community & allotment gardens. At the corner of Jonesville Crescent and Victoria Park Avenue, the Jonesville Allotment Gardens are an ideal community meeting place and collaborative green space. Community members can apply for an allotment at the gardens to grow fresh produce and/or flowers, and residents of the neighbourhood often share with one another at the allotments and learn about each other's gardens. The park itself also has a small picnic area and benches, an ideal spot to stop and admire the community gardens.

Warner Park Playground
75 Warner Avenue
An enclosed park with an extensive children's climbing structure, Warner Park Playground is a perfect spot for recreation. The green space also features a multipurpose field and plenty of benches to stop and sit down.

Bartley Park
112 Bartley Drive
Located in a quieter residential area, Bartley Park includes a children's playground, picnic area, and paved walkways.

Victoria Village Arena
190 Bermondsey Road
Victoria Village Arena is located toward the southern part of the neighbourhood. The facility offers programming for community members of all ages, from preschool children to older adults. Hockey and skating is offered for adults and children, as well as other sporting activities, as the arena also features a gymnasium. In addition to athletics, the arena offers programs in the arts, social clubs, creative playtime, and leadership.

Wigmore Park
106 Wigmore Drive
Wigmore Park features a lit ball diamond, multipurpose green space, and a children's playground. The park also includes gravel walkways and connects with Anewen Greenbelt, which includes paved trails. Wigmore Park lies in close proximity to the eastern side of Charles Sauriol Conservation Area, which is another stop on this stroll.

Sweeney Park
110 Sweeney Drive
Sweeney Park includes a lit ball diamond and multipurpose field space for outdoor activities. Amid sloping lawns and flat grass, there are also paved trails and benches to stop and rest.

Sridurka Hindu Temple
30 Carnforth Road
The temple is an impressive example of Hindu Agamic architecture, with its signature symmetrical design, and is a gathering place for the Hindu community in North York. The Sridurka Hindu Temple is the only temple in North America to have been consecrated with the highest ranked consecration rituals for 108 days and 33 Homas, performed by 50 priests from 6 countries. 90 million mantras were chanted continuously for three years.

Historic Wexford Cemetery Memorial Cairn
Lawrence Avenue East and Victoria Park Avenue (southwest corner)
This cairn marks the site of the original Wexford Cemetery, established in 1841 by the Wesleyan Methodist congregation in the area. One of the oldest sites in the neighbourhood, the cemetery was conveyed to the Canadian Methodist Church in 1884, and later to the United Church of Canada in 1925. The date of the cemetery's closure is unknown. While the gravestones no longer exist in their original locations, their remnants are buried within the base of this cairn. All legible inscriptions were recorded with the Archives of Ontario, with the monument dedicated to the memory of these early settlers.

Charles Sauriol Conservation Area
1191 Lawrence Avenue East
The Charles Sauriol Conservation Area is part of the East Don River Trail system, which offers premier wildlife spotting opportunities and forested parkland ideal for outdoor recreation. There are also countless opportunities for cycling on the trails. The conservation area is named after Charles Sauriol, a Canadian naturalist who was a strong advocate for the preservation of the Don River valley. A property owner in the area, Sauriol was a member of the Metropolitan Toronto and Region Conservation Authority and can be credited with the conservation of much of the Don Valley. Having raised over $20 million during his career to protect natural areas, Sauriol has been commemorated with four other locations in Canada named after him. He died in 1995, aged 91.

Milne House
Old Lawrence Avenue
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. Milne House is one of the oldest structures in Victoria Village. The farmhouse is an early example of Gothic Revival architecture, and was completed sometime between 1860 and 1865. Interestingly, the front and back facades of the house are mirror images of each other; the house used to boast full-length porches. This house is the only surviving building of the 16 structures that made up Milneford Mills, founded by Alexander Milne. The site included a rare woolen mill, a dry goods store, a sawmill, barns, a wagon shop, workers' housing, and the Milne family's residences. Milne House survived one of Toronto's worst floods in 1878. The other buildings were demolished in the 1940s when the mills closed, and in the years following. This house was in use until the 1960s, and privately owned until 1992. A listed heritage building, it is now protected by the City of Toronto.

Milne Hollow
East Don Trail
Also situated on the original site of Milneford Mills, Milne Hollow is a natural green space offering trails and outdoor recreation areas. Once an active industrial site, this location was a small community formed by the presence of the mill and surrounding buildings, including Milne House. The mill community was first centered around Wilket Creek in what is now Edwards Gardens; Alexander Milne originally built his three-story mill there in 1827. However, low water supply led him to relocate a mere five years later. By 1861, Milneford Mills produced over 2,000 metres of cloth and almost 122,000 metres of lumber. The mills and bridge were swept away in the devastating flood of 1878. Today, Milne Hollow is notable for its bird populations. The City's Bird Flyway initiative has transformed it from an industrial and agricultural centre to a diverse habitat for over 200 bird species to breed and rest.

Explore Victoria Village

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Kate Nankervis
Toronto Public Library: Don Mills Branch
888 Lawrence Ave E, North York, ON M3C 1P6

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

From community-based gardens, parks, and playgrounds to a once-thriving historic mill town, Victoria Village has a rich and memorable history of natural conservation. This stroll explores the features of the neighbourhood with respect to the protected spaces within it - all of which have a fascinating story to tell. Fantastic local businesses are located on Lawrence Avenue East, Bermondsey Road, Sloane Avenue, and Eglinton Avenue East.

Main Streets: Lawrence Avenue East, Bermondsey Road, Sloane Avenue, Eglinton Avenue East
  1. Jonesville Allotment Gardens
    Intersection of Jonesville Crescent and Victoria Park Avenue
    *Note: Please follow Toronto Public Health's guidelines for visiting community & allotment gardens. At the corner of Jonesville Crescent and Victoria Park Avenue, the Jonesville Allotment Gardens are an ideal community meeting place and collaborative green space. Community members can apply for an allotment at the gardens to grow fresh produce and/or flowers, and residents of the neighbourhood often share with one another at the allotments and learn about each other's gardens. The park itself also has a small picnic area and benches, an ideal spot to stop and admire the community gardens.
  2. Warner Park Playground
    75 Warner Avenue
    An enclosed park with an extensive children's climbing structure, Warner Park Playground is a perfect spot for recreation. The green space also features a multipurpose field and plenty of benches to stop and sit down.
  3. Bartley Park
    112 Bartley Drive
    Located in a quieter residential area, Bartley Park includes a children's playground, picnic area, and paved walkways.
  4. Victoria Village Arena
    190 Bermondsey Road
    Victoria Village Arena is located toward the southern part of the neighbourhood. The facility offers programming for community members of all ages, from preschool children to older adults. Hockey and skating is offered for adults and children, as well as other sporting activities, as the arena also features a gymnasium. In addition to athletics, the arena offers programs in the arts, social clubs, creative playtime, and leadership.
  5. Wigmore Park
    106 Wigmore Drive
    Wigmore Park features a lit ball diamond, multipurpose green space, and a children's playground. The park also includes gravel walkways and connects with Anewen Greenbelt, which includes paved trails. Wigmore Park lies in close proximity to the eastern side of Charles Sauriol Conservation Area, which is another stop on this stroll.
  6. Sweeney Park
    110 Sweeney Drive
    Sweeney Park includes a lit ball diamond and multipurpose field space for outdoor activities. Amid sloping lawns and flat grass, there are also paved trails and benches to stop and rest.
  7. Sridurka Hindu Temple
    30 Carnforth Road
    The temple is an impressive example of Hindu Agamic architecture, with its signature symmetrical design, and is a gathering place for the Hindu community in North York. The Sridurka Hindu Temple is the only temple in North America to have been consecrated with the highest ranked consecration rituals for 108 days and 33 Homas, performed by 50 priests from 6 countries. 90 million mantras were chanted continuously for three years.
  8. Historic Wexford Cemetery Memorial Cairn
    Lawrence Avenue East and Victoria Park Avenue (southwest corner)
    This cairn marks the site of the original Wexford Cemetery, established in 1841 by the Wesleyan Methodist congregation in the area. One of the oldest sites in the neighbourhood, the cemetery was conveyed to the Canadian Methodist Church in 1884, and later to the United Church of Canada in 1925. The date of the cemetery's closure is unknown. While the gravestones no longer exist in their original locations, their remnants are buried within the base of this cairn. All legible inscriptions were recorded with the Archives of Ontario, with the monument dedicated to the memory of these early settlers.
  9. Charles Sauriol Conservation Area
    1191 Lawrence Avenue East
    The Charles Sauriol Conservation Area is part of the East Don River Trail system, which offers premier wildlife spotting opportunities and forested parkland ideal for outdoor recreation. There are also countless opportunities for cycling on the trails. The conservation area is named after Charles Sauriol, a Canadian naturalist who was a strong advocate for the preservation of the Don River valley. A property owner in the area, Sauriol was a member of the Metropolitan Toronto and Region Conservation Authority and can be credited with the conservation of much of the Don Valley. Having raised over $20 million during his career to protect natural areas, Sauriol has been commemorated with four other locations in Canada named after him. He died in 1995, aged 91.
  10. Milne House
    Old Lawrence Avenue
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. Milne House is one of the oldest structures in Victoria Village. The farmhouse is an early example of Gothic Revival architecture, and was completed sometime between 1860 and 1865. Interestingly, the front and back facades of the house are mirror images of each other; the house used to boast full-length porches. This house is the only surviving building of the 16 structures that made up Milneford Mills, founded by Alexander Milne. The site included a rare woolen mill, a dry goods store, a sawmill, barns, a wagon shop, workers' housing, and the Milne family's residences. Milne House survived one of Toronto's worst floods in 1878. The other buildings were demolished in the 1940s when the mills closed, and in the years following. This house was in use until the 1960s, and privately owned until 1992. A listed heritage building, it is now protected by the City of Toronto.
  11. Milne Hollow
    East Don Trail
    Also situated on the original site of Milneford Mills, Milne Hollow is a natural green space offering trails and outdoor recreation areas. Once an active industrial site, this location was a small community formed by the presence of the mill and surrounding buildings, including Milne House. The mill community was first centered around Wilket Creek in what is now Edwards Gardens; Alexander Milne originally built his three-story mill there in 1827. However, low water supply led him to relocate a mere five years later. By 1861, Milneford Mills produced over 2,000 metres of cloth and almost 122,000 metres of lumber. The mills and bridge were swept away in the devastating flood of 1878. Today, Milne Hollow is notable for its bird populations. The City's Bird Flyway initiative has transformed it from an industrial and agricultural centre to a diverse habitat for over 200 bird species to breed and rest.

Accessibility information: Take caution when walking near or on trails; there may be uneven ground at the parks and conservation sites. Take care when crossing busy streets and approaching underpasses.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.