West Hill

East Point Park
101 Copperfield Road
Located along the shore of Lake Ontario, East Point Park is a vast green space. Spanning over 55 hectares, it is one of the largest parkland areas along Lake Ontario. The park is part of Scarborough Bluffs, a significant geological feature formed by the natural processes of wind and water erosion, running along Lake Ontario. East Point Park boasts beautiful views of Lake Ontario, with access points to trails on either end of the park that lead to the elevated lakeshore. The park provides an abundance of opportunities for bird watching and monarch butterfly viewings, and features steel pavilions in prime observation areas. The park is part of the migratory route for monarch butterflies, and is home to over 178 species of birds. Other local wildlife such as white-tailed deer and many bat species inhabit the parkland, making it an ideal place to enjoy Scarborough's natural landscape.

Heron Park and Community Centre
292 Manse Road
Heron Park is a 4.7-hectare park located just off Manse Road. The park features a number of tennis courts and a ball diamond as well as a children's playground. The park is also home to the Heron Park Community Centre, which features more sports facilities, including a gym, indoor rink, and outdoor pool. The community centre services community members of all ages, offering a preschool and an enhanced youth centre called the 6IX. The 6IX is one of ten enhanced youth centres operated by city community centres, which provide a supervised space for youth to have access to Wi-Fi, games, study spaces, recording studios, as well as access to different programs such as yoga, photography, and music recording.

Richardson-Corson House and John Richardson House
21 Old Kingston Road
*Note: Private Property. Please observe the houses from the sidewalk only. These two houses were constructed for the Richardson family, who arrived in Scarborough from Ireland. John Richardson house at 27 Old Kingston Road was first constructed out of wood in 1824, and was eventually laid over with brick when a second storey was added in 1860. This home is an example of Upper Canadian vernacular style. John H. Richardson, the first postmaster and township treasurer of West Hill, inhabited this house before building a second home for his family in 1904. Located at 21 Old Kingston Way, Richardson-Corson House is a charming example of a Queen Anne dwelling. This home is named for both the Richardson family and Dr. Corson, a later inhabitant of the residence. Both homes retain many of the original features and are designated heritage properties.

West Hill Park
170 Weir Crescent
West Hill Park is an open green space that features a baseball diamond and a children's playground. An accessible path winds through the park and connects to the playground, making it the perfect spot for a stroll.

Robert Matejka 'Bridging' Mural
3998 Lawrence Avenue East
Following along the south-facing wall of the bridge, this mural was designed as part of a project done by a group of youth and community members. Led by mentor artist Robert Matejka, the mural was painted by Johnny Yang, Tristan Joseph, Gabriella Berdugo, Curtia Wright, Christina Simms, Emilie Wong and Nigel Martin. The mural depicts the flora and fauna of the parkland around the bridge, and is interspersed with footprints of both the people and wildlife of the area. The painting was completed in 2010 as part of the City of Toronto's Graffiti Transformation Program.

St. Margaret in-the-Pines Church and Cemetery
4130 Lawrence Avenue East
First constructed between 1833 and 1839, St. Margaret's Church was the first Anglican church in Scarborough. The church is thought to be named for Margaret Fitzgibbon, the wife of church warden and clerk Simon E. Washburn. A brick parsonage was built in 1857 to house the clergy, and was used for the next 100 years. The original wooden building burned down in 1904, and was replaced by the small brick building that still stands in the cemetery. Eventually, the congregation grew too large for this building and the new church was constructed in mid-century modern style, and underwent additions until the 1990s. The original site of the church and the adjoining cemetery still remain as a part of the township of Scarborough's early history and the 1904 building is a designated heritage property.

Amir Akbari 'Behind the Lines' Mural
4371 Kingston Road
This mural was done in a partnership with artist Amir Akbari's organization Behind The Line and the Boys and Girls Club of East Scarborough. The mural was painted with the support of three youth artists under the mentorship of Akbari. This mural celebrates music and portrays a visual representation of sound through an image of a guitar and a portrait of a woman playing the trumpet, from which abstract sound elements emerge.

Richard Eade House and Native Child and Family Life Centre
156 Galloway Road
Built between 1882 and 1885, this house was constructed for Richard Eade, a descendant of settlers who operated a general store in West Hill. Eade purchased the house in 1891, which is a designated heritage property and remains an example of Gothic Revival architecture. The house is now home to the Native Child and Family Services of Toronto's Scarborough Child and Family Life Centre, which built an extension to the existing heritage building. The new building is constructed to have a curving structure with expansive windows, and is designed to be environmentally friendly. It is composed of renewable wood, and includes geothermal heating and rainwater collecting systems. The centre offers a variety of programs for Indigenous children, youth, and adults.

Amir Akbari 'Our Heroes' Murals
4301 Kingston Road
Led by Amir Akbari, this series of murals along Galloway Road and Kingston Road were done in partnership with the Boys and Girls Club of East Scarborough. Based on the theme 'Our Heroes', this mural is the first in a series of murals of different sizes designed to support community engagement and strengthen the sense of belonging for all.

Galloway Park and the Boys and Girls Club of East Scarborough
90 Galloway Road
Running along Galloway Road, Galloway Park is a 2.5-hectare wooded green space that features a children's playground. The park is also home to the Boys and Girls Club of East Scarborough, and the distinctive, colourful mural that wraps around the building. The Boys and Girls Club offers a variety of childcare, before and after school programs, camps, sports, recreation, and leadership programs to children and youth in the community.

Boys and Girls Club of East Scarborough
100 Galloway Rd, Scarborough, ON M1E 1W7
Poems For Your Path
Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Randell Adjei

Explore West Hill

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Randell Adjei 
Boys and Girls Club of East Scarborough
100 Galloway Rd, Scarborough, ON M1E 1W7

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This stroll takes you through the many parks of the West Hill neighbourhood, and showcases the changing community from nineteenth century houses to youth-focused community centres. Experience the natural beauty of the Scarborough Bluffs by stopping by East Point Park or explore the smaller parks that dot the neighbourhood. Visit some of the oldest remaining houses of the neighbourhood along Old Kingston Road while viewing the murals designed by local youth artists and community members that brighten the urban landscape. Wonderful local businesses are located along Lawrence Avenue East and Kingston Road.

Main Streets: Lawrence Avenue East and Kingston Road
  1. East Point Park
    101 Copperfield Road
    Located along the shore of Lake Ontario, East Point Park is a vast green space. Spanning over 55 hectares, it is one of the largest parkland areas along Lake Ontario. The park is part of Scarborough Bluffs, a significant geological feature formed by the natural processes of wind and water erosion, running along Lake Ontario. East Point Park boasts beautiful views of Lake Ontario, with access points to trails on either end of the park that lead to the elevated lakeshore. The park provides an abundance of opportunities for bird watching and monarch butterfly viewings, and features steel pavilions in prime observation areas. The park is part of the migratory route for monarch butterflies, and is home to over 178 species of birds. Other local wildlife such as white-tailed deer and many bat species inhabit the parkland, making it an ideal place to enjoy Scarborough's natural landscape.
  2. Heron Park and Community Centre
    292 Manse Road
    Heron Park is a 4.7-hectare park located just off Manse Road. The park features a number of tennis courts and a ball diamond as well as a children's playground. The park is also home to the Heron Park Community Centre, which features more sports facilities, including a gym, indoor rink, and outdoor pool. The community centre services community members of all ages, offering a preschool and an enhanced youth centre called the 6IX. The 6IX is one of ten enhanced youth centres operated by city community centres, which provide a supervised space for youth to have access to Wi-Fi, games, study spaces, recording studios, as well as access to different programs such as yoga, photography, and music recording.
  3. Richardson-Corson House and John Richardson House
    21 Old Kingston Road
    *Note: Private Property. Please observe the houses from the sidewalk only. These two houses were constructed for the Richardson family, who arrived in Scarborough from Ireland. John Richardson house at 27 Old Kingston Road was first constructed out of wood in 1824, and was eventually laid over with brick when a second storey was added in 1860. This home is an example of Upper Canadian vernacular style. John H. Richardson, the first postmaster and township treasurer of West Hill, inhabited this house before building a second home for his family in 1904. Located at 21 Old Kingston Way, Richardson-Corson House is a charming example of a Queen Anne dwelling. This home is named for both the Richardson family and Dr. Corson, a later inhabitant of the residence. Both homes retain many of the original features and are designated heritage properties.
  4. West Hill Park
    170 Weir Crescent
    West Hill Park is an open green space that features a baseball diamond and a children's playground. An accessible path winds through the park and connects to the playground, making it the perfect spot for a stroll.
  5. Robert Matejka 'Bridging' Mural
    3998 Lawrence Avenue East
    Following along the south-facing wall of the bridge, this mural was designed as part of a project done by a group of youth and community members. Led by mentor artist Robert Matejka, the mural was painted by Johnny Yang, Tristan Joseph, Gabriella Berdugo, Curtia Wright, Christina Simms, Emilie Wong and Nigel Martin. The mural depicts the flora and fauna of the parkland around the bridge, and is interspersed with footprints of both the people and wildlife of the area. The painting was completed in 2010 as part of the City of Toronto's Graffiti Transformation Program.
  6. St. Margaret in-the-Pines Church and Cemetery
    4130 Lawrence Avenue East
    First constructed between 1833 and 1839, St. Margaret's Church was the first Anglican church in Scarborough. The church is thought to be named for Margaret Fitzgibbon, the wife of church warden and clerk Simon E. Washburn. A brick parsonage was built in 1857 to house the clergy, and was used for the next 100 years. The original wooden building burned down in 1904, and was replaced by the small brick building that still stands in the cemetery. Eventually, the congregation grew too large for this building and the new church was constructed in mid-century modern style, and underwent additions until the 1990s. The original site of the church and the adjoining cemetery still remain as a part of the township of Scarborough's early history and the 1904 building is a designated heritage property.
  7. Amir Akbari 'Behind the Lines' Mural
    4371 Kingston Road
    This mural was done in a partnership with artist Amir Akbari's organization Behind The Line and the Boys and Girls Club of East Scarborough. The mural was painted with the support of three youth artists under the mentorship of Akbari. This mural celebrates music and portrays a visual representation of sound through an image of a guitar and a portrait of a woman playing the trumpet, from which abstract sound elements emerge.
  8. Richard Eade House and Native Child and Family Life Centre
    156 Galloway Road
    Built between 1882 and 1885, this house was constructed for Richard Eade, a descendant of settlers who operated a general store in West Hill. Eade purchased the house in 1891, which is a designated heritage property and remains an example of Gothic Revival architecture. The house is now home to the Native Child and Family Services of Toronto's Scarborough Child and Family Life Centre, which built an extension to the existing heritage building. The new building is constructed to have a curving structure with expansive windows, and is designed to be environmentally friendly. It is composed of renewable wood, and includes geothermal heating and rainwater collecting systems. The centre offers a variety of programs for Indigenous children, youth, and adults.
  9. Amir Akbari 'Our Heroes' Murals
    4301 Kingston Road
    Led by Amir Akbari, this series of murals along Galloway Road and Kingston Road were done in partnership with the Boys and Girls Club of East Scarborough. Based on the theme 'Our Heroes', this mural is the first in a series of murals of different sizes designed to support community engagement and strengthen the sense of belonging for all.
  10. Galloway Park and the Boys and Girls Club of East Scarborough
    90 Galloway Road
    Running along Galloway Road, Galloway Park is a 2.5-hectare wooded green space that features a children's playground. The park is also home to the Boys and Girls Club of East Scarborough, and the distinctive, colourful mural that wraps around the building. The Boys and Girls Club offers a variety of childcare, before and after school programs, camps, sports, recreation, and leadership programs to children and youth in the community.
  11. Boys and Girls Club of East Scarborough
    100 Galloway Rd, Scarborough, ON M1E 1W7
    Poems For Your Path
    Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
    Randell Adjei

Accessibility information: All points of interest are viewable from the sidewalk. This stroll takes place on streets and paved paths. The paved paths through East Point Park and Heron Park may be difficult to maneuver depending on weather conditions. West Hill Park and Galloway Park may have uneven ground and may be more difficult to navigate depending on weather conditions. The path to St. Margaret in-the-Pines may be difficult to navigate depending on weather conditions.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.