Weston-Pelham Park

S.A.D.R.A. Park
455 Old Weston Road
S.A.D.R.A Park is a small park with a playground and ball hockey pad. S.A.D.R.A. is an acronym for Silverthorn and District Ratepayers Association. It includes a unique paved trail that runs along the hydro corridor.

St. Clair Gardens Murals
In the alley behind St. Clair Avenue West (between Prescott Avenue and Blackthorn Avenue)
A gorgeous garden scene is painted on the backs of buildings in the alley behind St. Clair Avenue West. The murals were conceptualized by the late Mike 'Wunder' Kennedy, with contributions from artists Bacon, Kane, Wales, Kwest, Rony, Baker, Tensoe2, Flown, Vinse, Whysper, Smug, Adore, Miles, Ekwal, Braes, Sight, and Nick Sweetman.

Christiano de Araujo Mural
1687 St. Clair Avenue West
This mural illustrates family, as reflected by local residents and businesses, and the diversity of Toronto.

Moises Frank Mural
1747 St. Clair Avenue West
This mural by AKIN Collective (lead artist Moises Frank) was inspired by local residents and celebrates a community leader and the diversity of the neighbourhood.

St. Clair Major Theatre
1780 St. Clair Avenue West
This building used to house the St. Clair Major Theatre, which opened as a movie theatre in 1924 with seating for almost six hundred people. It was a popular destination in the neighbourhood given its proximity to streetcar lines on St. Clair Avenue West and Weston Road. Later it became known as the Cinema Italia and showed Italian movies. The building later became a place of worship and is now a well-known neighbourhood landmark, thanks to its iconic 'Jesus Saves' sign out front.

Evolution of Carleton Village Plaque
The St. Clair 512 Streetcar Eastbound Stop on Old Weston Road
This historical plaque notes the history of Carleton Village, which is what this area became known as in the mid-1800s. It describes how the area became prosperous largely thanks to the economic benefits of nearby railway lines, employing many local residents as conductors, loaders, station guards, repairmen, and engineers. The plaque also notes the importance of the streetcar line to the area, as many early local residents did not have the means to purchase vehicles, and horse carriage travel had become impractical due to rapid urbanization.

Heydon House
360 Old Weston Road
*Note: Parts of the building are private property. Please observe those areas of the building from the street only. Designed by architect James Ellis, this heritage-designated building originally opened as a hotel in 1891. The hotel was described by local media outlets as 'palatial', and was often patronized by Canadian Pacific Railroad workers. It became a site of controversy in the 1890s when police raided the hotel to stop the cock fights that were taking place in the ballroom. An infamous drunken brawl at the hotel in September of 1903 sparked a debate about the prohibition of alcohol in The Junction. The brawl helped solidify public opinion in favour of alcohol prohibition, which became law through a vote that took place shortly afterwards in January of 1904. The Junction then remained a 'dry' area until 2000! The building became a boarding house a few years after prohibition was enacted, and is now a mixed-use commercial and residential building.

Wadsworth Park
120 Connolly Street
One of the largest parks in the neighbourhood, Wadsworth Park features a bottle filling station, drinking fountain, outdoor basketball court, outdoor chess table, playground, sport field, and wading pool.

Davenport-Perth United Church
1900 Davenport Road
This heritage-designated church building is home to the second oldest Protestant congregation in Toronto, that celebrated their 200th anniversary in 2018 (the oldest congregation is St. James Cathedral). The current iteration of the building was designed by architect James Ellis in 1900 with enough space to accommodate four hundred worshippers. Notable architectural features include an arched Romanesque doorway and windows, and a traditional bell tower. In 1984, the building became home to the Davenport-Perth Neighbourhood Centre after the congregation voted to allow the community group to utilize its space. It continues to offer a wide variety of services to the local community.

Pelham Avenue Playground
20 Pelham Avenue
This popular local green space includes a playground and wading pool.

Explore Weston-Pelham Park

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

We want to hear from you! Click here to complete a short survey

Suppport small business owners by Shopping Small.

Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Women Paint
Toronto Public Library: Dufferin/St. Clair Branch
1625 Dufferin St, Toronto, ON M6H 3L9

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

Both past and present meet in this stroll, which goes through a small neighbourhood with a rich industrial and railroad heritage. Check out some spectacular public art along St. Clair Avenue West, fascinating historic sites such as Heydon House and Davenport-Perth United Church, and some excellent greenspaces like S.A.D.R.A Park. Many local businesses can be found on St. Clair Avenue West in the St. Clair Gardens BIA, and along Davenport Road and Old Weston Road.

Main Streets: St. Clair Avenue West, Davenport Road, Old Weston Road
  1. S.A.D.R.A. Park
    455 Old Weston Road
    S.A.D.R.A Park is a small park with a playground and ball hockey pad. S.A.D.R.A. is an acronym for Silverthorn and District Ratepayers Association. It includes a unique paved trail that runs along the hydro corridor.
  2. St. Clair Gardens Murals
    In the alley behind St. Clair Avenue West (between Prescott Avenue and Blackthorn Avenue)
    A gorgeous garden scene is painted on the backs of buildings in the alley behind St. Clair Avenue West. The murals were conceptualized by the late Mike 'Wunder' Kennedy, with contributions from artists Bacon, Kane, Wales, Kwest, Rony, Baker, Tensoe2, Flown, Vinse, Whysper, Smug, Adore, Miles, Ekwal, Braes, Sight, and Nick Sweetman.
  3. Christiano de Araujo Mural
    1687 St. Clair Avenue West
    This mural illustrates family, as reflected by local residents and businesses, and the diversity of Toronto.
  4. Moises Frank Mural
    1747 St. Clair Avenue West
    This mural by AKIN Collective (lead artist Moises Frank) was inspired by local residents and celebrates a community leader and the diversity of the neighbourhood.
  5. St. Clair Major Theatre
    1780 St. Clair Avenue West
    This building used to house the St. Clair Major Theatre, which opened as a movie theatre in 1924 with seating for almost six hundred people. It was a popular destination in the neighbourhood given its proximity to streetcar lines on St. Clair Avenue West and Weston Road. Later it became known as the Cinema Italia and showed Italian movies. The building later became a place of worship and is now a well-known neighbourhood landmark, thanks to its iconic 'Jesus Saves' sign out front.
  6. Evolution of Carleton Village Plaque
    The St. Clair 512 Streetcar Eastbound Stop on Old Weston Road
    This historical plaque notes the history of Carleton Village, which is what this area became known as in the mid-1800s. It describes how the area became prosperous largely thanks to the economic benefits of nearby railway lines, employing many local residents as conductors, loaders, station guards, repairmen, and engineers. The plaque also notes the importance of the streetcar line to the area, as many early local residents did not have the means to purchase vehicles, and horse carriage travel had become impractical due to rapid urbanization.
  7. Heydon House
    360 Old Weston Road
    *Note: Parts of the building are private property. Please observe those areas of the building from the street only. Designed by architect James Ellis, this heritage-designated building originally opened as a hotel in 1891. The hotel was described by local media outlets as 'palatial', and was often patronized by Canadian Pacific Railroad workers. It became a site of controversy in the 1890s when police raided the hotel to stop the cock fights that were taking place in the ballroom. An infamous drunken brawl at the hotel in September of 1903 sparked a debate about the prohibition of alcohol in The Junction. The brawl helped solidify public opinion in favour of alcohol prohibition, which became law through a vote that took place shortly afterwards in January of 1904. The Junction then remained a 'dry' area until 2000! The building became a boarding house a few years after prohibition was enacted, and is now a mixed-use commercial and residential building.
  8. Wadsworth Park
    120 Connolly Street
    One of the largest parks in the neighbourhood, Wadsworth Park features a bottle filling station, drinking fountain, outdoor basketball court, outdoor chess table, playground, sport field, and wading pool.
  9. Davenport-Perth United Church
    1900 Davenport Road
    This heritage-designated church building is home to the second oldest Protestant congregation in Toronto, that celebrated their 200th anniversary in 2018 (the oldest congregation is St. James Cathedral). The current iteration of the building was designed by architect James Ellis in 1900 with enough space to accommodate four hundred worshippers. Notable architectural features include an arched Romanesque doorway and windows, and a traditional bell tower. In 1984, the building became home to the Davenport-Perth Neighbourhood Centre after the congregation voted to allow the community group to utilize its space. It continues to offer a wide variety of services to the local community.
  10. Pelham Avenue Playground
    20 Pelham Avenue
    This popular local green space includes a playground and wading pool.

Accessibility information: All points of interest on this stroll are viewable from the street. All green spaces feature paved paths.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.