Woodbine-Lumsden

Terry Fox Recreation Centre & Gledhill Junior Public School
2 Gledhill Avenue
The Terry Fox Recreation Centre has been located within Gledhill Junior Public School since 1983, and offers free athletic programs for children and youth, such as indoor soccer, a basketball league and an NHL street hockey league. Named after Terry Fox to honour his commitment to raising money for the fight against cancer, the centre is a diverse community hub. Gledhill Junior Public School itself began as a schoolhouse in 1917, with 300 students. By 1925, the school had grown to house 30 classrooms, notable for its Edwardian architecture. The school has remained a neighbourhood landmark ever since, with up to 1200 students at its highest enrollment as the Danforth grew into a busy retail area over the years.

Heritage Home at 17 Gledhill Avenue
17 Gledhill Avenue
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. This house at 17 Gledhill Avenue is one of the oldest remaining homes in the neighbourhood. Designed with elements of Edwardian and Romanesque architecture, it is a heritage-listed building and sits near the original dirt road that was first built in the Danforth area. The covered doorway boasts an awning held up with Corinthian columns and is accented with ornate stonework over the top facade of the awning. Although the exact date of its construction is unknown, the house was likely built in the early twentieth century when the neighbourhood was just beginning to expand.

Gledhill Park
125 Gledhill Avenue
Ideal for families with small children, Gledhill Park is conveniently situated within the heart of the Woodbine-Lumsden neighbourhood. The park is enclosed by a fence and boasts a playground, swings, a splash pad, benches to sit on, and green space. The park is best approached on foot as there are limited parking options.

Elicser Elliot 'Sight Gives Flight' Mural
320 Lumsden Avenue
This mural, bearing the words 'Sight Gives Flight', was painted by Toronto-based artist Elicser Elliot in 2016. The artwork is a compelling tribute to working women of colour in the city and a vibrant artwork presiding over the heart of the neighbourhood. The site has also been home to an outpouring of support for BIPOC community members both within the neighbourhood and in the wider city as a whole. Elicser Elliot was introduced to street art during his studies at the Etobicoke School of the Arts. He went on to study animation at Sheridan College, and has exhibited his work at the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Royal Ontario Museum and the Toronto Jazz Festival. He is an advocate for public art within the city and continues to produce public art installations across Toronto.

D.A. Morrison Middle School
271 Gledhill Avenue
D.A. Morrison Middle School was first opened in 1921 as Danforth Park Public School. Designed by S.B. Coon & Son and completed in 1922, the building boasted Roman columns and elements of Edwardian and Art Deco architecture. However, the school had not finished evolving, and it underwent many more changes throughout the twentieth century. In 1952, it was renamed Oak Park Junior High School, before finally being demolished in the late 1970s to make way for a new school building. The current building stands on Gledhill Avenue, compared to its previous orientation on Lumsden Avenue. In 1977, the school reopened, still as Oak Park Junior High, although its new facilities were built in the modernist style, as can be seen in its minimalist architecture. In 1980, the school was renamed a final time, in honour of Dalton A. Morrison - a former teacher, principal, and Director of Education within the Toronto District School Board.

Everett Park
10 Everett Crescent
Officially opened in 2014, Everett Park has walkways, benches, a picnic area and green space that offers an excellent spot to relax.

Stan Wadlow Park
888 Cosburn Avenue (accessible via Haldon Avenue)
Stan Wadlow Park is located at the northern end of the neighbourhood. It features six ball diamonds, one of which is lit for nighttime use, a clubhouse, a multipurpose sports field, an off-leash area for dogs, a splash pad, and a playground. The park also includes the Kiwanis Outdoor pool for swimming. A substantial green space, the park's namesake Stan Wadlow was an alderman for East York and served as the Commissioner for Parks and Recreation within the borough during the 1950s. Before his involvement with the borough, Wadlow was a successful professional soccer player within Toronto. He remained involved with the borough until his death in 1989.

East York Skatepark
888 Cosburn Avenue
The East York Skatepark is located toward the west side of Stan Wadlow Park. It is a representation of the plaza style, in which skatepark features are styled to look like natural urban features such as benches, railings, and stairs. It also contains a figure-8 bowl. The skatepark was completed in 2007, with local community members of East York having advocated for its creation since 1998. Designed by Jim Barnum and constructed by Eric Meunier, the skatepark was created in consultation with youth community members. Local skaters remain involved with the skatepark by organizing annual spring cleanups, murals, and new additions.

Moises Frank Art Installation
South side of Stan Wadlow Park (opposite of the intersection of Cosburn Avenue and Gledhill Avenue)
This large, four-sided art installation features local imagery, from the natural elements of the surrounding community to the people and pets that frequent the parks. The art was painted by Moises Frank, also known as Luvsumone. Frank is a local artist who does all of his spray painting freehand, without the use of stencils, tape or chalk. He advocates for graffiti as public art within local communities. In June of 2020, Frank collaborated with fellow artist Jessy Pacho to take part in Paint It Black, an art initiative to paint Toronto's Graffiti Alley with new murals of prominent Black figures along with messages of solidarity. Frank also teaches public art skills to youth in the Greater Toronto Area.

East York Memorial Arena
888 Cosburn Avenue
Housed in a circular building in the modernist style, the East York Memorial Arena has indoor skating rink space and offers free public skating for community members as well as rink space for youth skating lessons. The arena was commissioned through the dedication of local volunteers to house the East York Hockey League. Established in 1944, the league originally played their games outdoors, but this meant coaches and spectators had to spend prolonged periods standing outdoors in freezing temperatures. The arena was built as a result, and opened for the 1951-1952 season with the Toronto Maple Leafs playing an exhibition game of 'blue vs. white'. In the years that followed, the arena also played host to professional wrestling, showcasing wrestlers such as 'Whipper' Billy Watson and 'Yukon' Eric. Today the arena upholds a hockey tradition that has been alive in the neighbourhood for over half a century.

Former Garage of Hollinger Bus Lines
1485 Woodbine Avenue
This site marks the former headquarters of Hollinger Bus Lines, East York's early precursor to the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC). Hollinger Bus Lines was the largest of the independent city bus lines eventually acquired by the TTC. It served the East York area from 1921 to 1954, when the TTC bought the bus company to consolidate public transit. At the time of its inception, Hollinger served the residential area of East York, which at that time was adjacent to Toronto and north of the Danforth. The bus line expanded to a dozen routes in its final years, with a fleet of 56 city buses. The main bus terminal stood at Coxwell Avenue and Danforth Avenue, and this site acted as the main garage until the TTC acquisition. This spot serves as a lasting reminder of Toronto's early public transit history and the evolution of the TTC.

Explore Woodbine-Lumsden

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Don't Miss

Artists from various disciplines present messages of hope and resilience throughout the city in the form of text-based visual art installations.
Hiba Abdallah
Toronto Public Library: Beaches Branch
2161 Queen St E, Toronto, ON M4L 1J1

Check out main street storefront art installations, in the neighbourhood or nearby, created by Local Arts Organizations and Business Improvement Areas across the City.

Painting Icon StrollTO Guided Walks:

On select weekend dates, join guided walks and discover the diverse histories and cultural significance behind neighbourhood landmarks and attractions.
Learn more and register.

We hope that you enjoyed exploring this Toronto neighbourhood and found many other points of interest along the way. While StrollTO highlights some of the 'hidden gems' in the neighbourhood, there may be others that could be included in a future edition. Would you like to share a point of interest that you discovered in the neighbourhood? Email us at [email protected].

Neighbourhood Stroll

This stroll explores Woodbine-Lumsden, a neighbourhood with a strong history of collaboration and community. From hockey at the East York Memorial Arena to the elaborate East York Skatepark, residents have built a dynamic and colourful part of the city with something for everyone. Fantastic local businesses can be found along Woodbine Avenue, Main Street, and Lumsden Avenue.

Main Streets: Woodbine Avenue, Main Street and Lumsden Avenue
  1. Terry Fox Recreation Centre & Gledhill Junior Public School
    2 Gledhill Avenue
    The Terry Fox Recreation Centre has been located within Gledhill Junior Public School since 1983, and offers free athletic programs for children and youth, such as indoor soccer, a basketball league and an NHL street hockey league. Named after Terry Fox to honour his commitment to raising money for the fight against cancer, the centre is a diverse community hub. Gledhill Junior Public School itself began as a schoolhouse in 1917, with 300 students. By 1925, the school had grown to house 30 classrooms, notable for its Edwardian architecture. The school has remained a neighbourhood landmark ever since, with up to 1200 students at its highest enrollment as the Danforth grew into a busy retail area over the years.
  2. Heritage Home at 17 Gledhill Avenue
    17 Gledhill Avenue
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the sidewalk only. This house at 17 Gledhill Avenue is one of the oldest remaining homes in the neighbourhood. Designed with elements of Edwardian and Romanesque architecture, it is a heritage-listed building and sits near the original dirt road that was first built in the Danforth area. The covered doorway boasts an awning held up with Corinthian columns and is accented with ornate stonework over the top facade of the awning. Although the exact date of its construction is unknown, the house was likely built in the early twentieth century when the neighbourhood was just beginning to expand.
  3. Gledhill Park
    125 Gledhill Avenue
    Ideal for families with small children, Gledhill Park is conveniently situated within the heart of the Woodbine-Lumsden neighbourhood. The park is enclosed by a fence and boasts a playground, swings, a splash pad, benches to sit on, and green space. The park is best approached on foot as there are limited parking options.
  4. Elicser Elliot 'Sight Gives Flight' Mural
    320 Lumsden Avenue
    This mural, bearing the words 'Sight Gives Flight', was painted by Toronto-based artist Elicser Elliot in 2016. The artwork is a compelling tribute to working women of colour in the city and a vibrant artwork presiding over the heart of the neighbourhood. The site has also been home to an outpouring of support for BIPOC community members both within the neighbourhood and in the wider city as a whole. Elicser Elliot was introduced to street art during his studies at the Etobicoke School of the Arts. He went on to study animation at Sheridan College, and has exhibited his work at the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Royal Ontario Museum and the Toronto Jazz Festival. He is an advocate for public art within the city and continues to produce public art installations across Toronto.
  5. D.A. Morrison Middle School
    271 Gledhill Avenue
    D.A. Morrison Middle School was first opened in 1921 as Danforth Park Public School. Designed by S.B. Coon & Son and completed in 1922, the building boasted Roman columns and elements of Edwardian and Art Deco architecture. However, the school had not finished evolving, and it underwent many more changes throughout the twentieth century. In 1952, it was renamed Oak Park Junior High School, before finally being demolished in the late 1970s to make way for a new school building. The current building stands on Gledhill Avenue, compared to its previous orientation on Lumsden Avenue. In 1977, the school reopened, still as Oak Park Junior High, although its new facilities were built in the modernist style, as can be seen in its minimalist architecture. In 1980, the school was renamed a final time, in honour of Dalton A. Morrison - a former teacher, principal, and Director of Education within the Toronto District School Board.
  6. Everett Park
    10 Everett Crescent
    Officially opened in 2014, Everett Park has walkways, benches, a picnic area and green space that offers an excellent spot to relax.
  7. Stan Wadlow Park
    888 Cosburn Avenue (accessible via Haldon Avenue)
    Stan Wadlow Park is located at the northern end of the neighbourhood. It features six ball diamonds, one of which is lit for nighttime use, a clubhouse, a multipurpose sports field, an off-leash area for dogs, a splash pad, and a playground. The park also includes the Kiwanis Outdoor pool for swimming. A substantial green space, the park's namesake Stan Wadlow was an alderman for East York and served as the Commissioner for Parks and Recreation within the borough during the 1950s. Before his involvement with the borough, Wadlow was a successful professional soccer player within Toronto. He remained involved with the borough until his death in 1989.
  8. East York Skatepark
    888 Cosburn Avenue
    The East York Skatepark is located toward the west side of Stan Wadlow Park. It is a representation of the plaza style, in which skatepark features are styled to look like natural urban features such as benches, railings, and stairs. It also contains a figure-8 bowl. The skatepark was completed in 2007, with local community members of East York having advocated for its creation since 1998. Designed by Jim Barnum and constructed by Eric Meunier, the skatepark was created in consultation with youth community members. Local skaters remain involved with the skatepark by organizing annual spring cleanups, murals, and new additions.
  9. Moises Frank Art Installation
    South side of Stan Wadlow Park (opposite of the intersection of Cosburn Avenue and Gledhill Avenue)
    This large, four-sided art installation features local imagery, from the natural elements of the surrounding community to the people and pets that frequent the parks. The art was painted by Moises Frank, also known as Luvsumone. Frank is a local artist who does all of his spray painting freehand, without the use of stencils, tape or chalk. He advocates for graffiti as public art within local communities. In June of 2020, Frank collaborated with fellow artist Jessy Pacho to take part in Paint It Black, an art initiative to paint Toronto's Graffiti Alley with new murals of prominent Black figures along with messages of solidarity. Frank also teaches public art skills to youth in the Greater Toronto Area.
  10. East York Memorial Arena
    888 Cosburn Avenue
    Housed in a circular building in the modernist style, the East York Memorial Arena has indoor skating rink space and offers free public skating for community members as well as rink space for youth skating lessons. The arena was commissioned through the dedication of local volunteers to house the East York Hockey League. Established in 1944, the league originally played their games outdoors, but this meant coaches and spectators had to spend prolonged periods standing outdoors in freezing temperatures. The arena was built as a result, and opened for the 1951-1952 season with the Toronto Maple Leafs playing an exhibition game of 'blue vs. white'. In the years that followed, the arena also played host to professional wrestling, showcasing wrestlers such as 'Whipper' Billy Watson and 'Yukon' Eric. Today the arena upholds a hockey tradition that has been alive in the neighbourhood for over half a century.
  11. Former Garage of Hollinger Bus Lines
    1485 Woodbine Avenue
    This site marks the former headquarters of Hollinger Bus Lines, East York's early precursor to the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC). Hollinger Bus Lines was the largest of the independent city bus lines eventually acquired by the TTC. It served the East York area from 1921 to 1954, when the TTC bought the bus company to consolidate public transit. At the time of its inception, Hollinger served the residential area of East York, which at that time was adjacent to Toronto and north of the Danforth. The bus line expanded to a dozen routes in its final years, with a fleet of 56 city buses. The main bus terminal stood at Coxwell Avenue and Danforth Avenue, and this site acted as the main garage until the TTC acquisition. This spot serves as a lasting reminder of Toronto's early public transit history and the evolution of the TTC.

Accessibility information: All points of interest are viewable from paved sidewalks or paved park trails.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.